If I wanted to reload?

If I wanted to reload?

This is a discussion on If I wanted to reload? within the Reloading forums, part of the Defensive Ammunition & Ballistics category; I have been shooting for over 50 years never reload anything. Not even shot gun. Have a bit more time on my hands now and ...

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Thread: If I wanted to reload?

  1. #1
    VIP Member Array Smitty901's Avatar
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    If I wanted to reload?

    I have been shooting for over 50 years never reload anything. Not even shot gun.
    Have a bit more time on my hands now and would like to reload 9mm and possibly 380's.
    Recommend setups to look at I want.
    1.Quality I don't like junk anything
    2. Easy of use
    3. Every thing need and the good to have in one package if possible.
    4. Any loading I do will be to factory spec's not interested custom loads.
    I would be loading 115 ball,115 JHP and 124 JHP 9mm
    380 would be 95 ball and 95 flat.
    I am listen give me some option to look at.


  2. #2
    Senior Member Array FLSlim's Avatar
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    I guess the first question you need to ask is how many rounds a month do you expect to reload. If it is only a couple of hundred a single stage press would be fine, is a lower cost option, and it would certainly be easy to use. As you go up in round count you could consider a turret or progressive press. My initial advice is to get a copy of the Lyman reloading manual and the ABCs of Reloading and see what your options are and what you would be getting into. Also, other internet sites like GlockTalk, BrianEnos, and a few others have some valuable introductory information (stickies) on reloading that would help in your decision.

    With that out of the way, Kempf's Gun Shop (online) has a pretty good deal (about $220 with an upgrade on the powder measure) for a Lee Classic Turret Press kit if you end up looking in that direction. In addition to such a kit, I think you would need calipers, a tumbler, and powder scale to get started. That would probably add another $100+ to your cost.

    Good luck!
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  3. #3
    Senior Member Array wormy's Avatar
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    I just started reloading about 6 months ago. I got a lot of recommendations to start with the Lee Anniversary kit. Its a single stage and includes everything you need to get started. (Except the dies). I got the Lee manual and read it cover to cover. I learned quickly on it and every round Ive done so far has been flawless. Im HOOKED on reloading. Its a great way to get away from the wife.

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  4. #4
    Distinguished Member Array claude clay's Avatar
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    I have been shooting for over 50 years never reload anything. Not even shot gun.

    if i understand this sentence correctly, you have a number of guns with very low round counts.

    are any for sale?

    ----------------------

    Lee classic 4-hole turret press.

    now its for you to step up and do some research as to best package deals and what extras ( scale, calipers, dies...)
    you will need. i will recommend: no E-scales, the Dillon Eliminator scale
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    VIP Member Array dukalmighty's Avatar
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    If you want quality nothing says it better than Dillon,and Dillon holds its value better than the cheaper products.
    If you only reload a few hundred rounds a month,the Dillon would be very pricey and would require several years to recoup the offset in savings.Which is why a Single stage may be better,you could resize and deprime the amount of cases you will reload all at once,then using a Lee hand primer take each case and seat a new primer.then the next 2 steps loading powder,seat and crimp ,would be the same thing doing all the cases at once for each step you could load,once you set your dies up if you have locking rings you could set the depth for each die and then lock the ring so each time you use it you can just screw it in to the preset depth.loading a couple hundred an hour would be an easy goal to achieve
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  6. #6
    VIP Member Array glockman10mm's Avatar
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    I still have the Lee anniversary kit I bought years ago. Still use it. You can use any dies you want but it works great for me.
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    VIP Member Array mcp1810's Avatar
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    If you are sure you are going to stick with handgun rounds I would suggest the Lee Progressive 1000. It is sort of the Chevrolet of the progessives while the Dillon is more the Cadillac. It is not as pretty. It is not as refined. but if you are just doing straight walled pistol stuff it is completely adequate. You can get automatic bullet feed, and case feeders so after you have it set up you can just sit there and pull the handle.
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  8. #8
    VIP Member Array Smitty901's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by claude clay View Post
    I have been shooting for over 50 years never reload anything. Not even shot gun.

    if i understand this sentence correctly, you have a number of guns with very low round counts.

    are any for sale?

    ----------------------

    Lee classic 4-hole turret press.

    now its for you to step up and do some research as to best package deals and what extras ( scale, calipers, dies...)
    you will need. i will recommend: no E-scales, the Dillon Eliminator scale
    I own many weapons and shoot often . I just never was into reloading. When we shot trap a family members did all the reloading. I talked to him but he has never reloaded any thing except 12 g.
    Everyone in my family use to shoot every weekend. Life got busy that slowed down . But a once pretty peaceful way of life is coming to an end.
    Things are changing and everyone is brushing up on old skills , Just wanted to look at reloading as an option.
    Daughter came over today we burnt up 200- 380's , 300 -9mm and 20 45's it adds up fast.

  9. #9
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    Smitty
    First off thanks for the good advice re the wi permit wait!

    I reload every thing from 380 to 500 S& W
    I can reload 5.7 x28
    I reload all my rifle ammo ( I can't even shoot factory ammo in my F- Class )

    I think you should get a RCBS Rock Chucker ( single stage) It is good quality and simple to use. Once you get some time on it and everything works good you could add a Dillion 550 progressive then make large volumes of pistol ammo real fast and make some nice ammo! I use the RCBS for the rifle stuff and the Dillion for practice ammo in hand guns. Because the Dillion is progressive and 4 things happen at once ( or one pull ) it is too much for a beginer. Learn to make it Right on the single stage. TAKE YOUR TIME! If you are not 100% going to jump into it then maybe go with the Lee kit, The Lee is a nice starter but won't last like the RCBS or Dillion ( if you make lots of bullets) Read up and ask questions, also don't believe everything you see on the internet regarding reloading. There is some great info out there and some no so good.

  10. #10
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    As others have already stated, your choice of equipment is going to come down to a couple of factors. First off, how many rounds do you want to do? Volume is going to be big difference between a progressive press or a single stage. The other factor that you have to consider is how much money do you want to spend to get started? A Dillon, as some have suggested, is going to cost quite a bit more to get going, whereas a single stage press is quite a bit less expensive.

    Faster production or less equipment investment?

    I reload on an RCBS Rock Chucker single stage press and I crank out plenty of rounds to keep me shooting, but it's just me shooting. I might shoot a couple hundred rounds a week or so, and replacing that kind of volume is usually done pretty quickly. I can't honestly say how quickly because I will sit and do big batches of one process at a time. I don't do 100 rounds start to finish in one evening. I just found that too inefficient for the time that I have to reload.

  11. #11
    VIP Member Array Smitty901's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MrBuckwheat View Post
    Smitty
    First off thanks for the good advice re the wi permit wait!

    I reload every thing from 380 to 500 S& W
    I can reload 5.7 x28
    I reload all my rifle ammo ( I can't even shoot factory ammo in my F- Class )

    I think you should get a RCBS Rock Chucker ( single stage) It is good quality and simple to use. Once you get some time on it and everything works good you could add a Dillion 550 progressive then make large volumes of pistol ammo real fast and make some nice ammo! I use the RCBS for the rifle stuff and the Dillion for practice ammo in hand guns. Because the Dillion is progressive and 4 things happen at once ( or one pull ) it is too much for a beginer. Learn to make it Right on the single stage. TAKE YOUR TIME! If you are not 100% going to jump into it then maybe go with the Lee kit, The Lee is a nice starter but won't last like the RCBS or Dillion ( if you make lots of bullets) Read up and ask questions, also don't believe everything you see on the internet regarding reloading. There is some great info out there and some no so good.
    Thanks I plan on getting around to looking at some this winter and make up my mind. Not much for winter projects on the bikes this years it leaves time for other things.
    The rifle rounds I just wait and make a good deal on bulk.
    It seems there is a wide range of opinions on how much the costs really are to reload. I stopped shooting when I left the Army, looking at burning up a couple 200 rounds a week myself, wife about 100 rounds add my kids when they stop over it could run up the number a lot.
    When all the kids were still at home we would use up 1000 rounds a month.

  12. #12
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    I do a lot of my reloading during the winter as well. I'll usually spend a few hours every other night or so and load until I run out of something (usually brass). Then I slack off during the summer and spend more time shooting up the stuff I've made. It works pretty well for me and it keeps me busy when it's too nasty to go outside anyway.

    I think at 200-300 rounds a week you could go either way but if it were me, I'd look at loading your rifle rounds too because that can be a huge savings given how much rifle ammunition costs today. If you want to do rifle rounds too, then you need a single stage press. Loading rifle rounds isn't too much different from pistol rounds, but there are some differences, so if you take up both, please be sure to follow the books or guides that you pick up.

    The Lyman reloading manual has good instructions and it's a great reference, especially if you want to load lead. Also the ABC's of Reloading is a great book to pick up that covers everything about reloading. Both are good investments to have around when you get started.

  13. #13
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    Smitty (from another Smitty) -

    I finally got into reloading about 9 months ago. I looked closely at the presses available; single stage vs. progressive, my shooting volume, and press features. I opted in favor of a progressive because MY shooting situation is that I'm shooting a few thousand of one caliber a year, but need/want a few hundred of 2-3 other calibers per year. For me, it came down to a tossup between the Dillon 550 and the Hornady AP. When I was ready to buy, Midway had a good price and Hornady had a rebate, so the Hornady overall saved me about $150 over the Dillon. Plus the Hornady has 5 stations and auto-indexing, vs. 4 stations and no auto-indexing on the Dillon.

    That said, I ran into some initial problems with the Hornady press which, had I not been as technical a guy as I am, would have probably resulted in me shipping the whole shebang back. But the Hornady people were easy-going and quick to respond, and the duration of my frustrations was limited to just shipping time after my calls. I have no doubt Dillon is equally responsive.

    With about 3500 rounds and 2 calibers under my belt, I still question whether I would have been better off with a single-stage press. It is far simpler to deal with sequential operations (decap and resize a hundred cases, prime a hundred cases, drop a hundred powder charges, etc.) than the pat-your-head-while-rubbing-your-tummy "circus" of a progressive press. The progressive requires you to be attentive to what's going on at least 4 operations per handle stroke, so it's easy to allow an error to propagate into several rounds before it's discovered. A progressive without auto-indexing also makes it fairly easy to throw a double-charge in a case, unless you take specific precautions to prevent that.

    Overall, it comes down to the volume that you shoot, and the dollar amount you're willing to invest. In hard numbers, I reload .45 ACP right now for less than 12 cents/round (assuming I have brass on hand), vs. about 38 cents a round for the cheapest store-bought stuff. By the time I hit 5000 rounds total, I will have recovered my total investment for the press, dies, scale, bench and accessories.
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  14. #14
    Member Array CaptSmith's Avatar
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    Its nice to change from one caliber to another, without removing dies, Dillon is great for this, there are other press's with this feature...But all you need is a solid press and the dies, scale, etc, to get started...I'd urge you to include a Chrono-graph purchase with your reloading equipment...really the best way to know what is working for your guns...I enjoy reloading as much shooting...

  15. #15
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    That RCBS Rock Chucker will work great for you! I found my second one ( I run two of these ) on Ebay brand new with free shipping.
    you will still need a re loaders manual, tumbler, scale, primer,powder dispenser,trimmers, small powder funnel, dies and shell holders,tumbler media.
    I like the Lee trimers for pistol cases they are 5.99 at Cabelas or 4.50 eBay. You need one for each caliber. Get an electric scale like the Dillon for 139.99. Makes it easy. You will need a powder dispenser, The cheap little Lee one works good. After time you can get a bigger and better one. Same with the primer, the little Lee is fine but you need shell holders for it. RCBS makes one for $70.00 bucks and no shell holders any cases will fit. I like to uniform primer pockets and flash holes but you won't for the Pistol cases.

    Save that brass. I save all mine. I don't take range brass. My club sells it for profit and you never know how many times it has been loaded. I keep track. Revolvers and bolt guns can reload more then semi autos.

    Like your rifle ammo in bulk you can also find projectiles in bulk. Get them by the pound or 500-1000 on line. No hassles with shipping projectiles. If you have to purchase all of your components retail there is little room for savings.

    I like to prep brass and load in the winter. I hate to have to prep brass in the summer. But sometimes you have to. I was lucky enough to shoot in the US Nationals but had to prep brass and load in Late August on a 80 degree day. Factory or surplus ammo won't cut it at 600,800, 900 and 1000 yards.
    One more thing: I enjoy reloading and have a sense of satisfaction with a cabinet full of precision ammo (that I made). If you don't enjoy the process, just purchase your ammo in bulk and look for the case deal! You could purchase a couple of cases for the equipment costs.

    I think once you start reloading you will enjoy it and be hooked on it!

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