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Lee factory crimp die

This is a discussion on Lee factory crimp die within the Reloading forums, part of the Defensive Ammunition & Ballistics category; Originally Posted by Tubby45 I don't care for the FCD at all. I think it's a crutch for people who don't properly size their brass. ...

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  1. #31
    Member Array RH45's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tubby45 View Post
    I don't care for the FCD at all. I think it's a crutch for people who don't properly size their brass. Furthermore, when using lead bullets, the FCD will swage these down smaller and this will cause leading with the bullet now being undersized for the bore.

    If you want to seat and crimp in separate steps, pop out the carbide sizing ring on the FCD or buy a non-FCD crimp die, such as Redding.
    You are correct.

    The biggest problem is if you are using old, hard brass that actually "springs back", after going through a FCD, while the bullet was made smaller. Perfect formula for setback, and blowing up a gun.


  2. #32
    Distinguished Member Array airslot's Avatar
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    I started using the FCD after bulging a number of 223 cases with a RCBS combo die. Ultimately, the RCBS dies had some galling in them. I have since switched to Hornady dies.
    The easy setup and performance of the FCDs, convinced me to get them for all six calibers (rifle /pistol) that I currently load. I don't load in high volume and the consistency of the finished product ( for me ) is worth the extra step in the process.
    The situation will NEVER BE THE WAY YOU WANT, it WILL BE THE WAY IT IS. You must be FLEXIBLE ENOUGH TO ADAPT and just "DEAL WITH IT".

  3. #33
    Member Array Exsimguy1's Avatar
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    RH45,
    If your brass was not oversize after seating the bullet (for whatever reason) before entering the FCD, it (the FCD) would have no effect other than the finely adjustable taper crimp that would be applied. The die only "sizes" down to factory SAAMI spec on the outside, squeezing the odd round that due to tolerance stacking will occur when loading mixed brass, and usually lead bullets. I don't agree with your argument, at least not as a general statement, that may erroneously lead others to a false conclusion.

    Love it or hate it, but let's leave the arguments realistic, please.

    Terry

  4. #34
    Member Array RH45's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Exsimguy1 View Post
    RH45,
    If your brass was not oversize after seating the bullet (for whatever reason) before entering the FCD, it (the FCD) would have no effect other than the finely adjustable taper crimp that would be applied. The die only "sizes" down to factory SAAMI spec on the outside, squeezing the odd round that due to tolerance stacking will occur when loading mixed brass, and usually lead bullets. I don't agree with your argument, at least not as a general statement, that may erroneously lead others to a false conclusion.

    Love it or hate it, but let's leave the arguments realistic, please.

    Terry
    You obviously didn't read the whole post.

    The biggest problem is if you are using old, hard brass that actually "springs back"

  5. #35
    Member Array Exsimguy1's Avatar
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    RH45,
    You didn't read my reply. The only springback that should happen if you "carefully choose the proper components" would happen during the resizing operation (first stage of reloading) as the "proper components" assmbled "correctly" would slide through the FCD without incident, other than the taper crimp it would apply. This happens with most all assembled loads. Most of the "bulging" of the case after bullet seating comes from lead bullets, thick wall cases (having been properly OD sized by the sizer die), and possibly oversized bullets, or some combination thereof.

    The argument that the FCD sizes below SAAMI dimensions is false. Unless the case is bulged larger than that (due to improper sizing?!?!?! - according to some), the FCD sizing ring does not touch the brass, so no squeezing to a smaller size, springback, etc. or otherwise would happen.

    Have the naysayers ever tried the die? I don't think so. My opinion is that some guessing is feeding most of the arguments.

    Terry

  6. #36
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    Ding-ding! To your corners, boys.
    Retired USAF E-8. Lighten up and enjoy life because:
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  7. #37
    New Member Array Mohctep's Avatar
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    I use the Lee factory crimp dies on all my 9mm,.40 S&W,45ACP,and 10mm Auto bullets.
    I love the product-and the reliable bullets it produces.
    Each to their own fate.....
    Last edited by Mohctep; August 12th, 2012 at 05:27 AM. Reason: Autocorrect

  8. #38
    Member Array ROFL SQUAD's Avatar
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    No problem with my 270FTWin, 9 and 10 million metre, Tree Eighty, or TooToo Tree versions.

    And I crimp very heavy.

    Lee products are vastly underrated.
    If you're going to carry one weapon, might as well carry two, because as the saying goes, "Two is one, and one is none."

    "Liberals can decline or whine, but I will still carry and conceal mine." - Cold Warrior. Excellent quote good sir!

  9. #39
    Member Array ThePontificator's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RH45 View Post
    You are correct.

    The biggest problem is if you are using old, hard brass that actually "springs back", after going through a FCD, while the bullet was made smaller. Perfect formula for setback, and blowing up a gun.
    Or using American Ammunition ("A-merc") casings. Haven't seen that stuff in years. Hopefully they went out of business?

    The Lee FCD was meant to be used with FMJ bullets. Many mfrs. of plated and coated bullets such as Precision Bullets specifically recommend that you not use the FCD.

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