Opinions for a loader for a beginner

This is a discussion on Opinions for a loader for a beginner within the Reloading forums, part of the Defensive Ammunition & Ballistics category; I have two rock chuckers that I use in conjunction with each other to speed up some tasks. I don't own a progressive, and honestly ...

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Thread: Opinions for a loader for a beginner

  1. #16
    Member Array msc8127's Avatar
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    I have two rock chuckers that I use in conjunction with each other to speed up some tasks. I don't own a progressive, and honestly don't desire one. RCBS equipment has never let me down, so that's where I would start personally. Once you get a process figured out you can load pretty quickly with a single stage press. Not anything near progressive speed, but fairly quick. However I think that when doing precision loading the single stage presses tend to encourage more tedious practices which yield better results. Only my opinion though.

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  3. #17
    Senior Member Array BamaT's Avatar
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    I still use a single stage press. It cannot match the speed of a progressive, however one thing I do to compensate to a degree is mass operations. I resize and deprime, and then prime, hundreds of rounds at a time, filling up a bucket of primed brass. I use the Lee auto disk to expand the case mouth and powder charge in the same step, charging several hundred rounds at a time and then seating bullets and crimping.

    A couple of caveats here. 1) I always weigh the powder charges thrown by the auto disk, after calibration of scales, and verify several charges. 2) I always examine every one of my loading trays under a bright light after powder charging, to make sure each case is charged, and is not double charged.

    Having at least a couple of different reloading manuals is a must, in my opinion. You should also obtain new manuals as they update their data for new powders, and also for changes to powder formulations. If you're going to shoot cast bullets, I highly recommend the Lyman manual.

    Lee products are good for the money, in my opinion, although I also have some RCBS equipment.
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  4. #18
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    I'm still using the same single-stage press and related gear I bought in 1975. It will load any caliber and any amount of rifle/pistol ammo I need but may take a while longer than a progressive. I've never had a double load, have butchered less than a dozen rounds over the years (it happens), and have had two duds--both bad primers.

    If you feel reloading is a necessary chore to enable you to load hundreds or thousands of rounds, get a progressive. If you feel reloading is an extension of the shooting sport and a hobby unto itself, a single-stage press is all you need, and the time it takes to reload.
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  5. #19
    Member Array ThePontificator's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BamaT View Post
    I still use a single stage press. It cannot match the speed of a progressive, however one thing I do to compensate to a degree is mass operations. I resize and deprime, and then prime, hundreds of rounds at a time, filling up a bucket of primed brass. I use the Lee auto disk to expand the case mouth and powder charge in the same step, charging several hundred rounds at a time and then seating bullets and crimping.
    This.

    I like to prime brass in bulk for future reloading times. I've got bags and bags of pistol brass that is polished, resized, de-capped and primed.

    The whole process is also made easier if you have several reloading trays (they're cheap). Then the number of cases you're flaring/charging/seating/crimping is only limited by the capacity of your trays.

  6. #20
    Senior Member Array FLSlim's Avatar
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    Before anything else, read everything you can get your hands on regarding reloading. The ABCs of Reloading and the Lyman manual (49th) would be a good start. Also several shooting forums that include reloading topics have very good "stickies" for those new to reloading. One important question you'll have to decide on is how much you want to spend to get into the hobby of reloading and the quantity of ammo you anticipate building. For a couple of hundred, you can get a decent single stage or turret set-up and easily produce several hundred rounds per week. Even if you upgrade to a progressive in the future, you'll have times when your old reloading equipment will come in handy. Of course, the sky is the limit if you aren't limited by cash...
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  7. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by ThePontificator View Post
    This.

    I like to prime brass in bulk for future reloading times. I've got bags and bags of pistol brass that is polished, resized, de-capped and primed.

    The whole process is also made easier if you have several reloading trays (they're cheap). Then the number of cases you're flaring/charging/seating/crimping is only limited by the capacity of your trays.
    I do much the same, only I use a Lee hand press and hand primer to size, flare, and prime all my handgun cases while reclining in my Laziboy and watching TV. Then when the urge strikes, I break out the powder dropper and press and finish off the reloads. It sure takes the drudgery out of reloading.
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  8. #22
    Member Array darkstar11's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldVet View Post
    I do much the same, only I use a Lee hand press and hand primer to size, flare, and prime all my handgun cases while reclining in my Laziboy and watching TV. Then when the urge strikes, I break out the powder dropper and press and finish off the reloads. It sure takes the drudgery out of reloading.
    I do roughly the same thing. I prime the cases I have decapped while I am sitting on the floor watching TV or helping the kids with homework. I use a Lee single stage kit that I bought at Cabelas and I have no complaints. I can load 500 rounds in a leisurely afternoon sitting at my home made bench in the downstairs family room.
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