Started setting up my reloading room today

Started setting up my reloading room today

This is a discussion on Started setting up my reloading room today within the Reloading forums, part of the Defensive Ammunition & Ballistics category; At about 8am I decided to clean out one of our rooms that have been used for storage for some time. Had lots of boxes ...

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Thread: Started setting up my reloading room today

  1. #1
    Member Array Fish_4_Fun's Avatar
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    Started setting up my reloading room today

    At about 8am I decided to clean out one of our rooms that have been used for storage for some time. Had lots of boxes and an old desk I was using as a reloading table. I was tired of having my press bounce around and things falling over while reloading. Here is the results of 8 hours of hard work. My Dillon 550B loves its new home and so do I. Still have alot of thing to get but like Jonny Cash, one part at a time.

    What do you think?

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  2. #2
    Member Array FLArmadillo's Avatar
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    That's cool man.
    As we used to teach in the spook business, carry a 25 if it makes you feel good, but do not ever load it. If you load it you may shoot it. If you shoot it you may hit somebody, and if you hit somebody - and he finds out about it - he may be very angry with you. -- Jeff Cooper

  3. #3
    Distinguished Member Array claude clay's Avatar
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    think its a good begning. write everything down--seems you got that covered.
    scale? dillon eliminator is tops. 4 extra primer tubs make the session go much smoother.
    lighting....the book kind for $10 with the flexable necks are great so you can see the powder before you place the bullet.

    and you melt...wnat calibers? shape #'s? Hardness?
    couple of moe load books to make comparsions.

    and more pictures...looking good
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  4. #4
    Member Array Fish_4_Fun's Avatar
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    I have only been reloadind for about 3 weeks

    Here is what I have so far...

    Dillon 550B press arrived 5-13-12
    Dillon .45acp dies
    Lee single stage press
    Lee melting pot
    Lee .452 mold, 230 LRN
    Lee .451 sizer
    Lee .452 sizer
    Alox
    Hornady powder scale
    Calipers
    1 pound Clays
    1000 Federal 150M primers
    Lyman reload manual
    Note books
    Bullet trays
    (I'm Sure I forgot some stuff)

    I am casting my own bullet due to having a little over 1000 pounds of lead


    claude clay, My grandfather was a roofer and the lead is old roof jacks. I would it's 100% lead. I do have a flex besk lamp mounted next to the press but I think I will check out the light you mentioned.

    Thanks,
    Chris
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  5. #5
    Distinguished Member Array claude clay's Avatar
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    Chris.....very good begning. lead needs to be mixed with zinc and tin to adjust its hardness. than it has to be lubed. Alox is a lube. some are liquid, some more like a plastic. they tend to be smoky so if shooting in low light the smoke cane be like fog in high beams.
    dillon is progressive, perhaps get the feel for what each die does using the single stage. than put it toghther with the progressive.
    slow aand deliberate is how one approaches a re-loader ( till your past the beginers feeling. but careful is always.
    g'nite & g'luck.

    i teach re-loading, metalic cartrages. but i've not done it long distance.--->small lol<---
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  6. #6
    VIP Member Array dukalmighty's Avatar
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    dillon is progressive, perhaps get the feel for what each die does using the single stage. than put it toghther with the progressive.
    The Dillon 550B is a manually operated progressive,it has a "star" wheel that you advance with your thumb.
    I hope your casting your bullets outside in fresh air,melting lead produces fumes that when breathed in starts accumulating in your system,not to mention washing your hands before smoking or eating.
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  7. #7
    Member Array Fish_4_Fun's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dukalmighty View Post
    The Dillon 550B is a manually operated progressive,it has a "star" wheel that you advance with your thumb.
    I hope your casting your bullets outside in fresh air,melting lead produces fumes that when breathed in starts accumulating in your system,not to mention washing your hands before smoking or eating.
    I cast indoors next to the window with a fan blowing outsite. Washing your hands good is a given. I plan on installing an overhead exhaust hood.
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    Member Array Gunsmoke16's Avatar
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    Looks great except for 2 MAJOR PROBLEMS... The powder and Primers sitting above your reloading presses (anyone else not catch this?). Any military surplus or sportsman's guide.com or cheaperthandirt.com get some bigger ammo cans like the 1000rnd .45 ones. Store the powder inside one and the primers inside another...on seperate ends of the room away from your reloading area entirely. Only keep out enough primers/powder that you will be using. If while reloading (or an inexperienced visitor smoking...) something gets ignited, you will have a huge explosion on you hands.
    Those Lee Hand Primers with the round tray is good example. Never use any Federal primers in LEE products unless loading one at a time. They're touchy and can explode..Friend Mark had this happen and luckily he was wearing safety glasses as they were embeded in his face, the wall and around the corner of the bedroom hallway into the bathroom. Please treat them with respect as both components are explosive and dangerous.
    Use cotton gloves if loading lead bullets (don't shoot lead out of a Glock, it can build up and explode the barrel-has special hexagonal rifled, hammer-forged barrels) to prevent lead poisoning- 1st sign you are getting tired and sleepy around 500rnds or so... BTDT.

    I like the bench setup. If you need to add another press or to keep one portable that moves: I took a 1ft long piece of 2x8 board and mounted the press to it using carrage bolts (no washers) that went from bottom up to the press and nuts with a lock washer, cranking them until the bolt heads were slightly recessed into the wood. I can sit this down anywhere on a table/desk/whatever and it won't scratch the surface. Using a similar board underneath with 2 C-clamps tightened down to the table, it's completely portable.

    We're happy to have you here and look forward to many years of happy shooting/reading together. Have fun/be safe.

  9. #9
    Distinguished Member Array Burns's Avatar
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    The day my wife would let me dedicate a whole room to my guns...
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  10. #10
    Member Array Gunsmoke16's Avatar
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    P.S. Cabela's have some great prices on Lee products and other reloading gear. It's best to try buy bullets locally, especially lead as it weighs so much the cost of shipping will probably equal the product cost. You need a good dial caliper/digital caliper, probably a micrometer (shop internet-they're not cheap...maybe harbor freight). A case polisher is a must. I used a Tupperwear bowl screwed to an old jigsaw, flipped upside down in middle of a box of canned food until I had enough money for a real one. I used a plastic sifter to get the media out of the cases. Corn cob media or walnut media for polishing stuff...sand would work in a pinch. Case debur inner/outer tool and a primer hole cleaner tool (make sure polishing media not stopping up the hole). Local ranges sometimes sell used brass reasonable. Inspect for bulging or small cracks prior to reloading and make sure not to double charge a case or under charge one causing a squib load in the gun. Ask reloaders here about casting...there is a certain amount of tin that has to mix to make it hard...certain hardness too or it will leave nasty lead fouling in barrel. Tire weights make good .45's if loading 200grn SWC. If you are working with lead, a drop of sweat can cause that stuff to explode like water in a deep-fryer...get some welder's gloves-eye protection. I always check out the local dollar type tool outlets for neat stuff.

  11. #11
    Member Array Fish_4_Fun's Avatar
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    Gunsmoke16

    Great advice. I do have 2 metal cabinets to store my powder and primers seperate(should have included in my pick). I am on the look out for 2 small fire safes just to be extra safe.
    You don't have to worry about me shooting lead out of a glock or even owning one.lol. I have my first IDPA shoot on June 2nd, and will be shooting SSP using a M&P 45. My current loads are 230 grain LRN,1.260 OAL, 3.8 grains of Clays and Federal 150mp primers.
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  12. #12
    Member Array Gunsmoke16's Avatar
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    Great... I like the 200grn SWC with a CCI primer, using 4.2grn Bullseye. It's very accurate. Given to me by a guy that shoots excess 10K rounds per year competition. Powder load is adjustable depending on barrel length. I was using a Norinco with all Chip McCormac internals, beavertail/trigger with a Cold National Match barrel/bushing combo in full 1911A1 gvt size. Bullseye uses less powder, so get lot more loads out of a can, but it is a little dirty burning. I always polish the feed ramp with dremel/jeweler's rouge to a mirror shine, inside top of barrel (hood) where bullet hits as it enters, just inside bottom of barrel where it hits after that right before final chamber. Prevents jams. Cut/flared ejection port. A Wilson Dyer Group Gripper ($30 Brownells) will really make it accurate...seen some improve from pie plate groups down to almost one hole. If using blued mags, I keep an old can of regular car wax and wipe them a little before going out or storing...it prevents rust and when they get warmed up, drops free very quickly. If you get a rust spot, erase it with lead pencil, lead it with the pencil, use touch-up blue pen and then oil it....just like new. See you have a Ruger pic...I love them. Carry a P95DC daily. Best value for a gun made today. Those old ammo cans are "designed" in case of an explosion inside them, that's why they open in two stages, like a car hood...the secondary catches it if it flies open and lets some of the "steam" out in a controlled manner. They're airtight and waterproof...makes first aid boxes for boats and will hold about 32 cd's in their jewel cases. Friend once wrecked a vintage MG and his cd's were only thing besides him that survived the impact. LOL If you shoot short barrel like 9mm, they don't like anything over 124grn bullets...causes FTF, especially with the 147grn. More people reporting problems with their guns and it's just the ammo. Some are picky. To prevent FTF problems in my .45 reloads, I went to a Taper Crimp die as the last stage, per my friend. It eliminated a lot of problems. Think I was getting about 6-10 reloads from a case. Usually they crack around head or stretch, requiring trimming. Another extra step I don't want to mess with. If you can use those Federal Primers, the propellant mixture is unique (as secret as the Coke Cola formula) and adds another 2,000lbs psi cup pressure. They're reliable. I do not like .40 caliber as it's just a way to re-invent the .45 with knockdown and more bullets per mag. Problem is cup pressure. The 9mm runs around 20-very hot 39,000 psi. A .45 is pretty low and would almost take a double charge to get up that high. A .40 has such a narrow margin of error in reloading it's downright scary. It's up there in the higher end near 40K psi as well. Problem is that breaking point of steel is around 40K+ depending on how it's made/treated. Too many people have overcharged...just a FEW grains...a .40 and blew them up. One local guy I know has destroyed 2 Glocks this way. Dangerous round. Most failures either blow out the side/top of slide or blow the slide off the gun or down the mag well. Old revolver shooters used to cup their hands under the grip. Never do this with a mag gun. I blew a .45 bushing out once and it cycled hard and did cause the mag to fall out-might lose a hand that way. I always use the push/pull hold and facing the target, both eyes open. Only close one for long shots-open you will be more steady and shoot better/faster. Reloading I always start with lowest grain powder and make about 5 test rounds with each grain up to half of the highest recommended. Somewhere in there, you will find your most accurate. Shoot 5, run a cleaner brush/swab, shoot 5 more. You will NEED a bullet puller hammer. It uses inertia to make the bullet come out and captures the round & powder for reuse (stuff happens...just don't overcharge it-if you think it did, pull it & start over). CLP Break Free is ok for cleaning. I use something called Lube1 which got at auto pts store. It won't rust even if it rains on you whill shooting the match. Gumout carb cleaner is fastest way to strip EVERYthing like grease/gunk out. Cheaper than Gunscrubber, but don't use on Berettas stainless finish or some plastic parts as can dissolve it. It will roll cosmoline out of those old war rifles like water too. Take care-Gun

  13. #13
    VIP Member Array suntzu's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dukalmighty View Post
    melting lead produces fumes that when breathed in starts accumulating in your system,not to mention washing your hands before smoking or eating.
    Good advice...wouldn't want to get any toxins or carcinogens in the tobacco

    Sorry, that was way to easy
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  14. #14
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    May want to do some research on the lead fumes going to poison you myth. This has been spread around for so long that it somehow now is presented as a fact. Lead does not boil till it reaches well over 3000degF. There is a general consensus that over 1000degF there's a small amount of fumes that may carry some oxides of lead but in such small levels they most likely will never leave the surface of the melt. The two most likely ways to get lead poisoning is ingestion and breathing lead dust (i.e. like sanding lead based paint). Do your own research and don't believe everything you read on the internet. Casting with a little common sense is as safe as most any thing we do.
    Last edited by Jeff F; May 29th, 2012 at 08:00 AM.
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    Looks like a great loading room! I wish I had the extra space for a dedicated loading room.

    I would suggest picking up a Lee hardness test kit if you are going to be alloying your own lead. Pure lead is way to soft for anything but musket balls.

    I recently started casting my own pills also. I found about 400 lb. of wheel weights at a local scrap yard and 200 lb. of roofing lead(vents, flashing etc.) for $0.40/lb. The wheel weights smelt out and check for about 19 on the Brinell scale. I will be getting some "Super Hard" alloy and tin from Roto Metals to mix up my own 92/6/2(lead/antimony/tin) alloy with the pure lead.

    Here is a great place to start looking for casting info.
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