Old manuals

Old manuals

This is a discussion on Old manuals within the Reloading forums, part of the Defensive Ammunition & Ballistics category; I have noticed that amazon and ebay carry a lot of the old manuals. Saw some speer and other brand manuals from what looked like ...

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Thread: Old manuals

  1. #1
    Senior Member Array zeppelin03's Avatar
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    Old manuals

    I have noticed that amazon and ebay carry a lot of the old manuals. Saw some speer and other brand manuals from what looked like the 60s-80s. Do these still have a place in modern reloading?

    I assume some loads would depend heavily on the gun they are going into. From what I gathered the charges were higher. For instance I would assume a heavy frame revolver may fair better with some loads than a new airweight.

    Anyhow, with proper increases in powder one could check for signs of overpressure and arrive at a safe load. Will these old manuals take me to a limit the new ones don't offer? Would it be more of a novelty to own than anything?

    Hope this thread is coherent. Jazzed up on some evening coffee.


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    I still refer to my Speer #9 on occasion. Of course, it doesn't list any newer powders developed since then, but what is listed in it for .38 148grn wadcutters is just as effective now as in '75 when I bought it. However, I wouldn't buy an old one in lieu of a current edition.
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  3. #3
    Senior Member Array zeppelin03's Avatar
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    Looking to supplement a new manual. Had a Lee manual in the past. Think of trying something new but cannot decide. Thinking speers newest, lee(since it is such a cheap book) , and a few old ones for kicks. They are real cheap online.

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    100 Reloading 1000 Firearm Manuals HODGON MEC ADI ALLIANT ACCURATE VIHTAVOURI, CD

    Just thought some of you might be interested in this - since the topic is Reloading Manuals. $6.99 & a couple of bucks for shipping.
    I came across it on Ebay a few weeks ago but, know nothing more about it other than the fact that it popped up in a search.

    100 Reloading 1000 Firearm Manuals HODGON MEC ADI ALLIANT ACCURATE VIHTAVOURI,CD | eBay

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    I've been handloading since the mid 1970s after being exposed to it earlier than that. Originally used borrowed equipment owned by family members but obtained my own set-up in 1978.

    I revere both the the 1978 Sierra manual, especially for rifle loads, and also the older Lyman manuals such as the 46th and previous editions designed on the same format. These are still trusted. I have various newer manuals but find them mostly unsatisfactory. Of course they are indispensable for propellent powder developments marketed in the past 30 years.

    The Speer manuals are fairly conventional. The Speer No. 9 was the first manual I acquired for my own library. The Speer No. 8 has some gutbustin' loads listed for SR 4756. Makes the .38 Special into an absolute hammer. I've tried the loads but am skeptical that they remain anywhere near as low as maximum SAAMI pressures.
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    Senior Member Array zeppelin03's Avatar
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    Looking at the Lyman manuals. Sounds like the cover a little of everything. Lee had a bunch of lead loads to match their bullet makers. Speer has loads for all their stuff. From what I gather Lyman doesn't play favorites in theirs.

    Most loads listed in the new ones will probably cover everything I need, but it would be nice to have a couple that were not tampered with by lawsuits. Then if the mood strikes can load up some real hot .357 and others.

  7. #7
    VIP Member Array frankmako's Avatar
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    i started reloading in 1973 and i still use/look at the data from my first manual. older manuals have good data in them. i all on the look out for them in yard sales, etc...
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  8. #8
    Senior Member Array FLSlim's Avatar
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    I never get rid of older manuals. That said, if you are buying, buy a new one to ensure you have the most recent listings of newer powders. Generally, though, you will find the older manuals list hotter loads than the newer (probably because of liability concerns rather than new pressure data).
    Chose a weapon that goes bang EVERY time!

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