What Bullet Do You Use In Your Shaving Brush?

This is a discussion on What Bullet Do You Use In Your Shaving Brush? within the Reloading forums, part of the Defensive Ammunition & Ballistics category; Said in your best Apocalypse Now voice: " I love the smell of 'wet badger' and .45-70 in the morning ... " And you know ...

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Thread: What Bullet Do You Use In Your Shaving Brush?

  1. #16
    VIP Member Array ccw9mm's Avatar
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    Said in your best Apocalypse Now voice: "I love the smell of 'wet badger' and .45-70 in the morning ..."

    And you know what they say: The family that wrestles 'wet badger' together, stays together.

    Texans!
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    Your best weapon is your brain. Don't leave home without it.
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  3. #17
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    When you have to shoot, shoot. Don't talk.
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  4. #18
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    That's for sticking those up. They'll be good for browsing.

    Here's where the badger hair knots came from: http://www.thegoldennib.com/index.ph...=index&cPath=9
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  5. #19
    Member Array rainmaker's Avatar
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    That's way cool. I've been shaving with a brush (virtually every day) for well over 40 years. Been thru a couple brushes, but never thought about how you could re-hab one, much less know where to get the stuff to do it. Thanks !
    Steve

  6. #20
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    Dang! I started with a "Fatboy" back in college, but then I grew a beard and only needed to trim around the edges for the next 40+ years. Wish I knew what became of mine... but where can you find double-edged blades these days?
    Smitty
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  7. #21
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    Westcoastshaving.com is where i bought mine. You can buy them locally at drugstores but they are crappy.

    One of the reasons I swapped to SE razor is that I actually like the blades from CVS pharmacy. My Ever-Ready 1912 is a sweet shaver that I paid $2 for at an antique store.


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  8. #22
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    I have a reenacting (RevWar) friend that puts all of your razors to shame age wise. He hasn't shaved with anything newer than 1800 since I've known him.

    I never had the nerve to try a straight razor. I watched my Grandfather do it, but figure if I tried someone would find me bleeding out on the bathroom floor!
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  9. #23
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    I too watched my grandfather shave with a straight razor but would need blood transfusions I'm sure if I ever tried it. I like stuff from bygone days but that's a bit too primitive for me.

    Gathered this in back in May while at an antique mall in Little Rock. Termed a Gillette Single Ring, it came with it's own serial number just like a firearm, which dates it to 1909. Tried it out and it was a bit severe. More akin to what I would imagine shaving with a straight razor would be like. Gave a fantastically close shave when used with care but whoo...it was dicey to use! I used it with a Feather brand blade which is generally held to be sharpest of them all.


    Was a whopping $4 when found in its ugly wild state. This one's silver plated and the silver was tarnished to a muddy dark gray. A little Tarnex soak and it was fine. Scrubbing Bubbles bathroom cleaner works great on the later Gillette razors, which are either nickel or gold plated, and then an alcohol dip and one is ready to go.

    The classic Gillettes, from the 1904 beginning to the 1960s, were of brass construction with plating of silver and later nickel and gold (24kt but so thin it's not worth recovering). Beginning in the 1960s some models used combinations of nickel plated brass heads with plastic handles. The older ones seem to be better crafted and the various models do offer their own unique shaving feel. They have to be tried to see which suits the individual best and no two people will have the same opinion. Same for all the myriad imported blades.

    Since I dig old stuff I like the Gillettes best but my son had gone the route of purchasing new imported razors and only got into the oldies after I came along. These new ones are mostly copies/revisions of basic Gillette designs. My problem with them is that most are made of Zamac plated with nickel. There are issues of plating coming off and razors shattering when dropped and some of these are quite expensive. Zamak is found in cheap handguns. It shouldn't be found in either razors or handguns. Some solid stainless steel double edged razors can be had but they are expensive. The old 1930s through 1950s Gillette models seem to exhibit the best design and workmanship for a person to be able to find a razor he can live with.


    Back to the shaving brushes. Those old EverReady brushes and other brands are easy to do if they are hollow to begin with and then one can enjoy a vintage product which is something I like. The "bullet treatment" administered while restoring them gives them a much better feel. Not much available in a household that is denser than lead. The brush isn't top heavy then and stands up better on the lavatory or counter. It feels more like using one of the expensive "fancy-Dan" brushes and one can install any sort of quality hair in it he wishes. Some folks are spending hundreds of dollars on silly shaving brushes with handles made from exotic materials and topped with the supposedly desirable "silver tip badger" hair. http://www.royalshave.com/p/411-092-...FdSPPAodUR0ANQ The "silver tip badger" knots are available for $30 + or -, depending on size ordered.

    For intriguing but pricey shaving items one can visit an Art Of Shaving location. My son, who is a Marine stationed at Twentynine Palms, Caifornia, and I visited this one in Las Vegas some months back. http://retail.theartofshaving.com/re.../canal-shoppes Being a Marine he's going whole hog and adopting the straight razor. He's tougher than I am.
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  10. #24
    Senior Member Array BamaT's Avatar
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    Brushes look great! I have been thinking of going back to a brush and soap mug. I hate paying the price for shaving cream. Been thinking of other razor options as well, blades are so expensive now.
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  11. #25
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    If one doesn't descend into making the acquisition of shaving gear a hobby then he can shave more inexpensively than the cartridge/can routine can provide, and gain a better shave while doing it. The mug and brush yields better lather than the can. One can still buy Williams shaving soap for anywhere from 98 cents to 1.95, depending on where you find it. Shave snobs poo-poo Williams but it's the original shaving soap, predating the Civil War, and works great. Sky's the limit on what may be spent on shaving soaps and creams found in both tubes and tubs but some really good stuff is out there.

    I played with a host of blade brands that were given me by my son and settled on Feather as the best overall. They're one of the more expensive blades but I ordered 200 of them for $62. That's a 2-year supply, using one per week which is realistic. Same money would not quite buy me 4 months worth of Gillette Fusion cartridges which is what I was using. The Fusions pull so much more in use than the sharp Feathers do.

    Since acquiring all those Feather blades I've about decided that a couple of inexpensive brands do really well, Astra, and Sharp. These are found for anywhere from about $9 per hundred to $15 per hundred. Those Feathers are very comfortable but sneaky and will give the odd weeper and one will never feel a thing.
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  12. #26
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    I sense a shaving and guns photo thread coming up... lol

    I'll second the the Feather blades as being the gold standard, but my current blades are the Gillette Platinums made in Sweden (aka Swedes), I find they are very sharp and give a smooth shave. I still have a few packs left but after they are gone I'm not sure what I'm going to use since as I understand it they have stopped making them in Sweden.
    "I got a lot of problems with you people!" - Frank Costanza

  13. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by bmcgilvray View Post
    If one doesn't descend into making the acquisition of shaving gear a hobby then he can shave more inexpensively than the cartridge/can routine can provide, and gain a better shave while doing it. The mug and brush yields better lather than the can. One can still buy Williams shaving soap for anywhere from 98 cents to 1.95, depending on where you find it. Shave snobs poo-poo Williams but it's the original shaving soap, predating the Civil War, and works great. Sky's the limit on what may be spent on shaving soaps and creams found in both tubes and tubs but some really good stuff is out there.

    I played with a host of blade brands that were given me by my son and settled on Feather as the best overall. They're one of the more expensive blades but I ordered 200 of them for $62. That's a 2-year supply, using one per week which is realistic. Same money would not quite buy me 4 months worth of Gillette Fusion cartridges which is what I was using. The Fusions pull so much more in use than the sharp Feathers do.

    Since acquiring all those Feather blades I've about decided that a couple of inexpensive brands do really well, Astra, and Sharp. These are found for anywhere from about $9 per hundred to $15 per hundred. Those Feathers are very comfortable but sneaky and will give the odd weeper and one will never feel a thing.

    Feather is my brand of choice also. I ordered a multi pack of different brand blades from Westcoastshaving some years ago, and still working through them. Merkur makes some decent blades, but for your $$$, you can't beat Feather. For those of you that are thinking about getting into this, I probably wouldn't recommend Feather as a starter brand. They are a pretty aggressive blade, and if you aren't patient, you'll look like something out of a bad 80's horror flick the first couple of times you shave. Gillette is a great blade to start with.
    I have a straight razor, a Thiers-Issard, that I paid probably too much money for back in the day. I use it if I go a couple of days without shaving, as I find it easier to cut the long hairs off vs. just a normal shave. But, I shave with the grain, then use my DE razor to shave against.
    Honestly, you don't really need to go with a DE blade if you aren't willing to spend the time essentially relearning how to shave. You get used to the 5 and 6 blade systems out there now, and you realize how much pressure you put on your face shaving with those things. Do the same with a DE razor, and you'll be having a transfusion .5 seconds into the shave. But, BUT, if you do start down this road, you'll soon learn that razor burn is a thing of the past. However, you can still go the brush/wet shave route with your normal Fusion or whatever you're currently using. Use a coffee mug and some soap that you pick up from Walgreens. You can also order some good soap/shaving cream from places like westcoastshaving and really go to the next step. Buy a cheapo brush from Walgreens as well (or eBay), and you're on your way.
    Sounds goofy, but watch some youtube videos on how to make lather. You'll find yourself using too much or too little water if you don't know the proper way.

  14. #28
    Distinguished Member Array phreddy's Avatar
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    I have been using derby blades for about 8 cents a piece. I can buy them by the hundred on amazon. I get a much better shave with them than I ever did with those $4 multi blade rip-offs.

    With a DE razor, let the weight of the razor do the cutting. Don't press down and you will be just fine.

    I have not been able to get a real close shave with my straight razor. Still trying to learn that one.

  15. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by gasmitty View Post
    Dang! I started with a "Fatboy" back in college, but then I grew a beard and only needed to trim around the edges for the next 40+ years. Wish I knew what became of mine... but where can you find double-edged blades these days?
    I buy mine at Winn Dixie $1.00 for 10. One blade lasts me 2-3 weeks
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  16. #30
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    I keep a short beard so... This has been the best tool I have ever used. It vacuums the hair into that compartment that you see on the front with the phillips logo. Its cordless and holds a charge for over a month at a time (and recharges overnight for that once-a-month plug-in). It has an adjustable guard for length with the turn of a dial and a large digital read-out. No mess, and no clogged sink after 1 use.


    I'm still a little old fashioned, though. For my neck, I use these. I'm open for some alternative suggestions. I like these because they are cheap and do the job, but I would opt for something better - so long as the price isn't outrageous. I really don't know much about razors, but I'm getting to the age where I would like some quality grooming tools.

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