At what point do you begin to save?

This is a discussion on At what point do you begin to save? within the Reloading forums, part of the Defensive Ammunition & Ballistics category; ...when you begin to discuss the purchase of the loading rig with the wife...of course......

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Thread: At what point do you begin to save?

  1. #16
    VIP Member Array Snub44's Avatar
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    ...when you begin to discuss the purchase of the loading rig with the wife...of course...

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  3. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by RonCo View Post
    I think that in this day and age the only advantage that reloading offers is availability of ammo during politically uncertain times such as these. And that's only true if you've acquired all of your tools and materials well ahead of the uncertain times like those we are currently facing.

    My approach is to budget in the most affordable "target/training" ammo that I can acquire and slowly stock pile it. As of this latest dry spell, I am sitting on about 1,500 rounds of various generic FMJ 115gr 9mm ammo and about 75 rounds of quality carry ammo (most of which is 135gr Hornady critical duty). And, several thousand rounds of .22 LR.

    Reloading is a great hobby, a wonderful skill to acquire, but no longer the savings value that it once was.

    Hell, I'm sure companies like Winchester and Remington buy brass and lead by the metric-ton, so the average DIY reloader will never be able to match the prices that these companies get by purchasing materials in bulk. Not to mention the streamlined, automated manufacturing processes that ensure consistent reliable loads at speeds that no one-man handmade approach could ever compete with.

    All of this results in better quality, more reliable, cheaper ammo... WHEN IT'S AVAILABLE.
    I'm going to disagree, it's still a considerable savings if you buy components in bulk and you purchase smartly to maximize your savings. For example, I reload mostly 9mm and .223, arguably two of the most cheaply purchased rounds available. I reload 9mm for under $12 per 100 (and that's with 147 gr. bullets) and I reload .223 for around $18 per 100. The fact that my rounds are tuned for their purpose is a bonus on top of the dollar savings, but the savings over manufactured ammunition is a tangible one. I just shoot it away with more range time, so it doesn't translate into money in the bank.
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  4. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by 031131 View Post
    Thanks for the help. Yeah those .308s are killing me. I haven't finished sighting in my scope and I've spent about $100 (going out to 800-1000 yards). Figured I need to get into reloading.
    I think you'll find you can create more accurate ammo than you can buy, especially when it comes to demanding requirements like hitting targets at those kinds of ranges.
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  5. #19
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    At what point do you begin to save?

    Quote Originally Posted by TX expat View Post
    I'm going to disagree, it's still a considerable savings if you buy components in bulk and you purchase smartly to maximize your savings. For example, I reload mostly 9mm and .223, arguably two of the most cheaply purchased rounds available. I reload 9mm for under $12 per 100 (and that's with 147 gr. bullets) and I reload .223 for around $18 per 100. The fact that my rounds are tuned for their purpose is a bonus on top of the dollar savings, but the savings over manufactured ammunition is a tangible one. I just shoot it away with more range time, so it doesn't translate into money in the bank.
    How much time would you say that you put into a good round of loading those two calibers?

  6. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by RonCo View Post
    How much time would you say that you put into a good round of loading those two calibers?
    Tough to tell. I don't sit down and go from step A to step Z in one fell swoop. I usually spend an hour sizing brass, or priming sized brass, or making live rounds. I don't sit down with an explicit time frame and definable intent, so I really can't say.
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  7. #21
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    I believe if you purchase components in bulk it will be in the the thousands of rounds pay back, but in my case even more since I upgrade my equipment on a regular basis. I also shoot 1000 yards plus and you need a scale that can measure down to the kernel, concentricity gauges, powder drop tubes, neck turning ...... I have to build my ammo there is no factory ammo that can work in my competition rifle.

    Much easier to load pistol but less payback, there should be more payback with .308.
    Fast is fine, but accuracy is everything.
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  8. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by MrBuckwheat View Post
    I believe if you purchase components in bulk it will be in the the thousands of rounds pay back, but in my case even more since I upgrade my equipment on a regular basis. I also shoot 1000 yards plus and you need a scale that can measure down to the kernel, concentricity gauges, powder drop tubes, neck turning ...... I have to build my ammo there is no factory ammo that can work in my competition rifle.

    Much easier to load pistol but less payback, there should be more payback with .308.
    I want to shoot some 1,000 yard stuff. I bet that'd be tons of fun! I'm lucky when I get to play around at 300 yards and that ain't all that often.
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  9. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by TX expat View Post
    I want to shoot some 1,000 yard stuff. I bet that'd be tons of fun! I'm lucky when I get to play around at 300 yards and that ain't all that often.
    At 1000 y with the high power scope, you can see the bullet travel into the target. It is fun however reading wind and other factors can be abummer some days. I am lucky that I am on a 4 man team that taught me well.
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  10. #24
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    I don't reload Rifle ammo but doing heavy pistol reloading in the early 1990's for competetion I paid for two Dillon SDB's and lots of components at around the 5-7K range and this was all 45ACP ammo. Later I started loading 9MM and then 40S&W. Yes buying in bulk (1000 Quantity or better in bullets and primers) saves a lot. Getting powder in 4LB cans saves a bit. Always police your brass from the range. I did an inventory of all my Stuff over the Christmas Holidays and identified the items I needed, ordered them and they have now arrived. I look 10 years down the road for ammo. That said I am loading powder and primers from the Clinton Scare and holding my powder and primers from the Pre 2008 Election. Lead will always be easy to get, primers and powder are different.
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  11. #25
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    At what point do you begin to save?

    Quote Originally Posted by TX expat View Post
    I'm going to disagree, it's still a considerable savings if you buy components in bulk and you purchase smartly to maximize your savings. For example, I reload mostly 9mm and .223, arguably two of the most cheaply purchased rounds available. I reload 9mm for under $12 per 100 (and that's with 147 gr. bullets) and I reload .223 for around $18 per 100. The fact that my rounds are tuned for their purpose is a bonus on top of the dollar savings, but the savings over manufactured ammunition is a tangible one. I just shoot it away with more range time, so it doesn't translate into money in the bank.
    How much time would you say that you put into a good round of loading those two calibers?

  12. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by RonCo View Post
    How much time would you say that you put into a good round of loading those two calibers?
    Are you trying to figure your time as wages? The benefits of reloading are numerous, however the only way to "make money" at it, is to sell it at the inflated price that ammo is going for nowadays.

    Back to your question, if truly meant as to how long it takes.
    If you are diligent, prepared, equipped, and organized, you can easily load 100 rounds of most anything in an hour or so, on a single stage press.

    If you are the above, AND, you have purchased, and properly set up one of the better progessive presses, you can produce 500-1000 or more, in the same amount of time.

    How well you shoot, how well you can/want to load, how carefully you follow procedures, and a long list of other qualifiers are needed to know if YOU, could/should/shouldn't bother to reload. It is not for everybody.

    Terry
    Last edited by Exsimguy1; January 27th, 2013 at 06:41 PM. Reason: extra word removal

  13. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by RonCo View Post
    How much time would you say that you put into a good round of loading those two calibers?
    My answer is five posts above this post!
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  14. #28
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    Figure it this way, your first box of reloaded ammo costs you around $600, give or take, depending on your choice of equipment. After that you are saving somewhere around 50% on every round you load if you buy in bulk.
    Chose a weapon that goes bang EVERY time!

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