Flash hole uniforming .223

Flash hole uniforming .223

This is a discussion on Flash hole uniforming .223 within the Reloading forums, part of the Defensive Ammunition & Ballistics category; Anyone think this is a must? If so, how do I know if I'm removing too much brass? I'm trying to just graze the flash ...

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Thread: Flash hole uniforming .223

  1. #1
    Member Array ConcealedinPA's Avatar
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    Flash hole uniforming .223

    Anyone think this is a must? If so, how do I know if I'm removing too much brass? I'm trying to just graze the flash hole.
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    Senior Member Array jem102's Avatar
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    Properly built tools from good suppliers have stops built into them so you don't remove too much material. They are ground to remove the "flashing" from around the hole and produce a shallow cone.
    I am very pleased with the K&M tool I use.
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  3. #3
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    Definitely not a must for plinking .223 ammo. I do it for mine but you don't need to.
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    Flash hole uniforming .223

    It's a must if you are talking about taking the crimp out so you can reload it. If that's not why you are doing it, then I would say it's not a must.


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  5. #5
    Senior Member Array jem102's Avatar
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    I thought the question was about "flash Hole" uniforming. If it's primer pockets are we talking removing the crimp or uniforming or both?

    On LC cases I prefer to cut the crimp out with one good twist of a 45į deburring tool. For depth uniforming again there are many good tools on the market. My tools of choice for this task are from Hart and K&M.

    I do consider it necessary to uniform the depth at the least every 3rd loading for my AR's as I run minimum head space and it's good insurance against "slam fires"
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  6. #6
    Member Array ConcealedinPA's Avatar
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    I have a Lyman with the stop. I just set it to remove minimal
    Quote Originally Posted by jem102 View Post
    Properly built tools from good suppliers have stops built into them so you don't remove too much material. They are ground to remove the "flashing" from around the hole and produce a shallow cone.
    I am very pleased with the K&M tool I use.
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    Senior Member Array Chuck R.'s Avatar
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    I reload .223 for both my Colt LE6920 (AR) and my Rem 700 XCR tactical. Depending on the rifle, my brass gets different treatment. The AR gets the primer pockets swaged IF thereís a crimp, and thatís it. The brass for my 700 gets the works, to include primer pocket uniforming, flash-hole deburring.

    IMHO. Itís not a must, but for precision work every little bit helps, and you can turn standard brass into match quality with the extra prep.

    Chuck
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  8. #8
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    I don't think its necessary for a .223.

    A friend of mine and his wife regularly goes up north to shoot prairie dogs and they each bring several rifles.

    She scored an 800+ yard kill with a rifle that I built using ammo loaded on a Dillon 550b.

    He's done it both ways and he concluded that its pretty much a waste of time for most shooting.

    With that being said, if you are into competition where winning and losing is the difference in a few thousandths of an inch, then it may be beneficial. If you need that type of accuracy, you are already sorting your cases, trimming each one, weighing each bullet and the rest of the multitude of tricks that benchresters use to win.
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    Member Array Exsimguy1's Avatar
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    Whether loading for match or not, trimming .223/5.56 brass to proper length is more important than all the other procedures. Since most brass available has been fired at least once, been Full length sized to bring to spec, it is almost always borderline too long. Firing that reload the first time, may not be dangerous, but if you ignore trimming NEXT time you full length size it, it will most probably be too long, thus pinching in the neck/throat area of the chamber, raising pressures (dramatically).

    Always check trim length on your brass, after sizing, before loading.

    Terry

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    Like Hotguns stated, ultra precision shooting is an all-or-nothing matter. In all my years of reloading and shooting, little has made a discernible difference in performance and accuracy for general purpose shooting (range, hunting, etc.) other than consistant powder measuring and bullet weight/style. Five-in-one-hole match shoooting is an entirely different game where no variances are tolerated.

    I've almost exclusively used Mil brass in my .223, and other than removing the crimp and an initial trimming, the cases receive no special treatment.
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    Only for my "F" Class matches where we shoot 800,900 ,1000 and 1,200 yards. But most of the time I do not use the .223 for that match only as a back up.
    For service rifle match I just look inside and see how much flash material is there. If I find a bad one I use the tool to scratch it off. I do not "drill" into the hole. I always inspect to make sure the holes are open. I look from both sides. One important thing I do is tumble clean my brass with liquid tumbler and stainless steel media. The brass is clean inside and out. I can very easily look inside the brass.
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    Member Array faif2d's Avatar
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    I just did this to 200 .223 of mixed manufactures. I was amazed at the difference in the size of the hole. I was "drilling" them by hand with a .081 dia drill. There were only a few, less than 10, that the drill fell through. Most would just touch the sides of the holes but a few (60?) or so required actually drilling the hole most could be broached with the drill bit. I use the same size on 8mm and 30-06 as well with similar size results. I did find a few 4 or 5 that had the hole way off center and those got pitched. I need all the help I can get for accuracy.

  13. #13
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    Mostly, "the flash hole uniforming" is to remove the burr on the backside of the flash hole for more uniform ignition.
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