Reloading guys - is this a good deal??

This is a discussion on Reloading guys - is this a good deal?? within the Reloading forums, part of the Defensive Ammunition & Ballistics category; So I scroll through my local armslist a good bit, and found this. I've made up my mind that I will be getting a reloading ...

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Thread: Reloading guys - is this a good deal??

  1. #1
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    Reloading guys - is this a good deal??

    So I scroll through my local armslist a good bit, and found this. I've made up my mind that I will be getting a reloading setup before years end, is this one worth jumping on? I'll mostly be reloading 9mm, and eventually others, but I don't have a need for the 38/357 yet. I know very little right now, but I will get some manuals and read, read, read before I get started. What do you guys think of this offer? I would just be offering cash.

    "Reloading supplies in new condition. Looking to trade as a package deal for a .22LR pistol, 357 mag. snubnose, Taurus 405 or sell individually.

    Lyman bench reloading press $45
    Lyman case lube pad $15
    Lyman 6.5x55 Swedish two die set $50
    Lee measure kit $20
    Lee auto primer $30
    Lee bullet seating die 38/357 $30
    Bullet puller $35
    CCI #200 1000 large rifle primers $50
    200 Hard cast bullets 158 grain SWC 38/357 $40
    100 Hornady 6.5mm 140 grain sniper point $30
    100 Sierra 6.5mm 140 grain spitzer point $30
    will include some brass in 6.5x55"
    The stupidity of some people NEVER ceases to amaze me.

    G19 AIWB

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  3. #2
    Member Array Aquaman's Avatar
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    I would guess it is a single stage press, while this will get the job done, I would recommend saving your money and buying a progressive style reloader, If you want to reload a small amount a single stage press is fine but to get quantity at a reasonably short time a progressive is the way to go. seems the price might be a little steep on some of the items.

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    Probably not a bad price for the press, and everyone who reloads will eventually want a solid single, even if you do not start with one.

    The rest of the stuff is way over priced for used gear. Though it is tough to find anything right now.

    Check ebay for Lee starter kits. There were a couple of the Challenger anniversary kits the last time I looked at decent prices.
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    Honestly, I'd have to know more about the Lyman press. What's the exact name or model? The press price is probably good, assuming it's a real bench mounted press. I don't think Lyman sells one for under $100. I don't know a darn thing about Lyman presses so I can't tell you if there is something wacky to look out for, but I'd research the actual press model just to be sure. The rest of the stuff, as far as I can tell, he's listing for pretty close to retail pricing, so I wouldn't bother with any of the rest of it.

    Just check out Midway.com and you'll find that you can get most of the other stuff for around the same price or less, brand new.

    Bullet Puller $15
    Lyman Lube Pad $9
    Lyman 6.5x55 two die set $35
    Lee Auto Primer $32
    Lee 3 die set for 38/357 $32 <-----that's the whole set of dies, not just the bullet seating die
    Lee Measure Kit? If that's a whole set of those little dippers (I didn't even realize they sold them as a set) $10 <-----the dippers are useless, get a scale!

    Basically, if the press is a good deal, then it'd be worth picking up. Presses last forever so as long as it isn't in terrible shape, it should be OK. Everything else isn't worth haggling over unless you just want to see how much he'll take for the lot and you are mindful of how much you can actually buy this stuff new for.

    Personally, I'd suggest you go check out some of the RCBS or Lee kits and see what you can do there. The kits are a decent way to get almost everything you need in one shot and some of the Lee equipment is very affordable.
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    Here's what I would get: Lee Load Master with 9mm dies

    Now, you have to understand that I am a Lee Precision fan boy! Lee makes good, reliable equipment at great prices. They do not make Rolls Royce quality equipment at any price!

    The load Master has it's quirks, just like any progressive, but at the price point it is well worth the minimal effort it takes to learn and overcome those quirks. There are tons of you tube videos on how to dial these guys in for reliable performance.
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    used equipment should start at 1/2 the new price is just a rule of thumb that I use. Learn to load with a good single stage, I've never had a good reason to be in a hurry when reloading, if a person is in that big a hurry either start sooner or go buy your ammo, if you can find it.

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    I don't see any good deal in that. You can pick up reloading kits for a decent price, although kits tend to have stuff you may not really need.

    My suggestions:
    Start out with a single-stage press. There are too many things that can go wrong in reloading with a progressive press for a novice. Plus, that's a lot of bucks if it turns out reloading is not for you. Once you have the basics down, you can always upgrade, although after over 30 years of reloading I haven't seen the need to do so myself. SG presses are slower, but unless you're needing to load 100s of rounds at a time they will most certainly get the job done. If you find you need to crank out a thousand rounds a week, a progressive is definitely in your future. I'm still using my 30+ year old press.

    Don't waste your time with non-carbide dies for handgun rounds. Lubing by any method is still a pain in the butt.

    You get what you pay for, but inexpensive isn't necessarily bad. I used some Lee equipment (inexpensive) and it gets the job done, but my RCBS equipment tends to do it better.

    Reloading is a hobby unto itself, not just a means of inexpensive ammo. It allows you to create loads that will outperform any commercial round. Take your time. Contrary to what some claim, reloaded ammo is every bit as reliable as commercial ammo. I've had two duds in all my years, both dud primers from the same pack. Reloading isn't rocket science, but it does take attention to detail. Distractions can have disastrous results.
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    Thanks for the replies guys. I'm definitely going with a single stage, looking to take my time and enjoy a new hobby that will aid my favorite hobby - shooting! I was planning on just getting a starter kit ( with a really good scale purchased separate from what I gather). I have just started to look at either the RCBS or lee kit. I'll be putting money aside for the purchase soon, I was just making sure this wasn't a good deal to jump on.
    The stupidity of some people NEVER ceases to amaze me.

    G19 AIWB

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    Distinguished Member Array Jaeger's Avatar
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    Really, start with a progressive for cartridges? I can understand bypassing a single stage to a progressive for shotgun shells, but I would think that someone new to reloading cartridges would want to start with a single stage press. It's not like it's that difficult or anything, but I would think you would want to start of slowly, and get confident making and then firing each round before you start mass producing them. Maybe not...

    As was said, you'll end up with (most likely several of them if you find reloading as relaxing as some of us do) a single stage eventually.

    I don't know a thing about Lyman either, but there isn't much to a single stage press. The Dillons, RCBSs, and Hornadys I'm familiar all seem to be over engineered to last several lifetimes with a little maintenance. Anyone ever wear out a press? Most of my equipment is inherited, and some of it was my Grandfathers. It all works like it just came out of the box.

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    Distinguished Member Array Jaeger's Avatar
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    I bought and RCBs kit years ago, and there is nothing wrong with the scale that came with it. It's a simple beam scale and it works. I've got I use a lab scale with a tear function, because I'm a lazy and make cartridges for long distances, but there is nothing wrong with the scales that come with the kits. They just take a little more time to properly measure. If you're making pistol ammo you're going to be using a powder measurer anyway, and the scale is just to set and check it, so it won't matter that it takes a little longer.
    I have an old, brass balance scale that has a complete set of brass weights (which I have checked against the lab scale and are exactly on) in a wooden box. I used those weights to check that RCBS scale when I got it, and it was spot on.
    Hold off on buying a different scale till you try the one that comes with it. I doubt with the standard scale that comes with RCBS or Lee you'll be disappointed, but you may be disappointed you upgraded and spent money for no reason.
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