load data - 125 gr XTP with H110 powder for 357 mag

load data - 125 gr XTP with H110 powder for 357 mag

This is a discussion on load data - 125 gr XTP with H110 powder for 357 mag within the Reloading forums, part of the Defensive Ammunition & Ballistics category; I've got 125 grain XTP bullets that I want to load to full power 357 rounds for my GP100 (6"). Load data seems to vary ...

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Thread: load data - 125 gr XTP with H110 powder for 357 mag

  1. #1
    Senior Member Array hayzor's Avatar
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    load data - 125 gr XTP with H110 powder for 357 mag

    I've got 125 grain XTP bullets that I want to load to full power 357 rounds for my GP100 (6"). Load data seems to vary from different manuals.
    Hodgdons online data has 21 gr min and 22 gr max of H110. Some other manuals are showing max under 20 grains.
    I'm starting low and working up, but not sure how low I should start.

    Anyone have some experience loading 125 XTPs with H110?
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    Senior Member Array Warmon's Avatar
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    16.3 to 22 for H110 according to the stevepages.com site. 357p_4_125
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    One of the variables that I see folks frequently fail to address (or to pay due attention to) is cartridge overall length. The wide range of charge loads called out in different manuals is often due to substantially different OALs, which for a given bullet obviously means different seating depths. Recipes with the same powder and bullet might achieve the same velocity with charge weights different by 15% or more because the effective volume in the loaded case is different.

    Other things to pay attention to are the difference in charge weights for jacketed vs. lead bullets (I note the link referenced above makes no distinction), and also how heavy a crimp is used. Ol' Elmer Keith was a fan of heavy crimps, but he was shooting lead bullets for the most part, and he needed to keep the bullets in place under recoil. A heavy crimp also requires a higher pressure to launch the bullet out of the case, which is often a requirement to get the max velocity out of a given charge.
    Smitty
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