BRAND new to reloading

BRAND new to reloading

This is a discussion on BRAND new to reloading within the Reloading forums, part of the Defensive Ammunition & Ballistics category; Looking at this to start with. I've reloaded 12ga, but no rifle or pistol. will this work for .257 WBY? or do i need more ...

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Thread: BRAND new to reloading

  1. #1
    Member Array pilot101's Avatar
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    BRAND new to reloading

    Looking at this to start with.




    I've reloaded 12ga, but no rifle or pistol. will this work for .257 WBY? or do i need more pieces to go from brass to shoot-able?
    "You are guaranteed to miss 100% of the shots you don't take" -Wayne Gretzky


  2. #2
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    Um... looking at what?

    "Always check to make sure you haven't anything out."
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    Smitty
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  3. #3
    Member Array pilot101's Avatar
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    "You are guaranteed to miss 100% of the shots you don't take" -Wayne Gretzky

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    Ex Member Array Gearhead's Avatar
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    Pilot - There ain't enough hardware in the picture to do what I think you want to do. A suggestion might be to find a friend that reloads centerfire rifle and spend an evening with him (or her) as they go through the motions. Take notes on what you'll need. Or, some reloading suppliers such as RCBS, Sierra, Hornady have some DVD's that take you through it step by step.

  5. #5
    Distinguished Member Array onacoma's Avatar
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    Yes if you're doing custom loads and are not wanting production. But you're missing powder scale, hand primer, calibers for length, etc.

    This one may be a better fit: Breech Lock Challenger Kit - Lee Precision

    YMMV
    BamaT likes this.


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    Member Array pilot101's Avatar
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    i think this set, along with LEE carbide dies and the right powder dipper is suppose to replace a table mounted system. i really like the idea of reloading anywhere.
    "You are guaranteed to miss 100% of the shots you don't take" -Wayne Gretzky

  7. #7
    Distinguished Member Array dangerranger's Avatar
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    I have one like that and it will work..... I use mine at the range to work up loads. But its not easy. Because its loose in your hands you will have to be very carefull to line up the bullet while not spilling the powder. Sometimes that is a trick. A better way to go is with a Lee kit that uses a standard press. I mount mine to a small plank and C clamp it to what ever bench Im using. That makes it portable and easier to use. DR
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    It can be done, but rifle cases are difficult with the hand press. I use one for all the prep work (sizing, flaring) for my handgun rounds, but it was a real chore for 5.56 cases. A better bet is the simple Lee single stage press attached to a piece of plywood that you can clamp in place wherever you want to work up a few rounds. Plus you'll need some sort of scales to measure each load.

    In reality, it's a very inefficient set up at best, and is more likely to turn you off from reloading rather than charge up your enthusiasm. It doesn't take a lot of equipment to reload, some is nice to have vs necessary, but a practical set up is essential.
    ETXhiker likes this.
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  9. #9
    Senior Member Array BamaT's Avatar
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    I agree with dangerranger, that will work, but not ideally. I also have a hand press, and it is handy for resizing brass while watching TV, or taking to the range for fine tuning a load. But a bench press really works much better. Even with a single stage press, which I would recommend for a beginner in any event, you can turn out a much higher volume than you would with the hand loader. I also agree with dangerranger that you will have to be very careful when seating bullets not to spill powder. The Lee Challenger set mentioned earlier will, in my opinion, do much better.

    Also, be sure to get a good loading manual. I especially like the Lyman book, and also use books by Hornady, Hodgdon, and Speer, and supplement those with Internet. The Accurate site has good data.

    If mobility is paramount, then the handloader will certainly work. If handloading for handguns, be sure and get carbide dies. I also highly recommend a scale for verifying the dipper loads. I've used dippers, and they do work, but I would prefer verifying how much powder you're throwing, especially if getting towards the upper range of a particular load. A hand priming tool will also be handy.

    Goos luck with it, and be sure to check in here with any questions. Lots of folks here who have been reloading for a long time and will be glad to help.
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  10. #10
    Member Array pilot101's Avatar
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    thanks everyone, will be looking at bench sets for a more through education in the reloading procedure. adding this to the B.O.B for sure though.
    "You are guaranteed to miss 100% of the shots you don't take" -Wayne Gretzky

  11. #11
    Distinguished Member Array dangerranger's Avatar
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    If I were strictly looking for a simple, small, loader to be used in a BOB, Then check out the Lee Loader

    Lee Loader 243 Win - Lee Precision

    These will load ammo that shoots, But not quickly. The Beauty of these is they will fit in a large coat pocket. Or get the Lee single stage kit and add the hand press as an accessory. The hand press uses the same dies as the bench mounted presses. DR

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UeEl9wZyabc

    [I had to watch twice to see him put a primer on]

  12. #12
    Senior Member Array mr surveyor's Avatar
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    I use nothing but the Lee Hand Press. I'm able to keep myself well supplied with .38 spl, .357 mag, .44 mag, .45 acp and .30-30 win. The only real difference I can see with any of these calibers as loaded in the hand press versus a bench mounted single stage, is the fact that the user isn't tied to a single "sitting position". I can sit back with my feet propped up and do all the depriming/resizing and flaring, or choose to stand or sit in the floor. It uses the same dies and shell holders you would use on any other press, and the same quick lock bushings that Lee uses on most of their bench mounted presses. Due to lack of space for a dedicated reloading bench I bought the Hand Press a couple of years ago, and I really believe that my "production" would not only not increase with a bench mounted single stage press, I might even be slowed down. I have recently gotten into the habit of depriming my brass with a universal deprimer die then dropping it into the ultrasonic cleaner to give it a thorough flushing out. When enough has collected, I'll spend a bit of time doing all the brass prep and box it up for a powder/bullet seating session depending on my current whim of powder/bullet choice. The .30-30 win is pretty thin brass, so it's not much more of a challenge than some of the .44 mag brass with the hand press. Anything stouter than the .30-30 would be a bit of a challenge with the hand press though.

    As for powder measure, I do use the Lee dippers, but only the dipper nearest to (but not exceeding) my desired load. The dipper makes the basic volume drop into the pan of a PACT digital scale, then a small additional amount is picked up to "trickle" to the desired load weight. Slow, maybe. Accurate and cautious, definitely.

    I do like the Hand Press.


    surv


    edit to add: I also use a Lee Hand Primer for all the handgun rounds, but use the Ram Prime (comes with the Hand Press) for the .30-30 needs.

  13. #13
    Member Array demofficer1988's Avatar
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    I also got the Lee kit came with everything except dies and has worked perfectly for my needs

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by pilot101 View Post
    thanks everyone, will be looking at bench sets for a more through education in the reloading procedure. adding this to the B.O.B for sure though.
    I would invest in Richard Lee's excellent book (Modern Reloading) and read the chapters preceding the load data twice. There's some great advice there on safety and on what the critical elements in reloading are (e.g., measure powder by weight or volume? what's more precise?). Digest all that info before you start buying equipment. Also, recognize that Lee stuff is generally the most 'economical' (being delicate here) but is not necessarily the best engineered out there. Before you plunk down your hard-earned dollars, I encourage you to survey all the major equipment elements out there (presses, dies, scales) and understand what you get for your money. AND - seek feedback from people who have used the equipment you're looking at (that's where we, the DC members, come in). You may be surprised at the responses.

    Go slow - the old 'measure twice, cut once' adage applies. And do recognize that a reloading in a bug-out situation is a whole 'nother animal from normal practice... I wouldn't let that drive the selection of my everyday tools.
    msgt/ret and ConcealedinPA like this.
    Smitty
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  15. #15
    Member Array Hamour's Avatar
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    I would go with a full sized reloading kit from one of the major manufacturers. O frame only. Become fully equipped to produce quality handloads at the bench. Then expand into the single case reloading systems for target shooters if that is your desire.

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