Storage of Supplies and Completed Rounds

This is a discussion on Storage of Supplies and Completed Rounds within the Reloading forums, part of the Defensive Ammunition & Ballistics category; I've just started reloading and the Lyman manuals talks about seperating supplies, powders, primers etc. Are they being legally cautious or is there some validity ...

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    Member Array chiltech500's Avatar
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    Storage of Supplies and Completed Rounds

    I've just started reloading and the Lyman manuals talks about seperating supplies, powders, primers etc. Are they being legally cautious or is there some validity to it?

    In looking at pictures on the "show your workbench thread" and it looks like most folks have all their supplies around their bench. I would sure love to keep all my supplies and completed rounds as in the pics.

    I'm using a finished part of my attic and in summer it might get up to 95-100 deg. Is that a problem with primers, powders, completed rounds?

    Thanks

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    Senior Member Array darbo's Avatar
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    This may or may not be the best but it's what I do. Primers are stored in 1 gal. storage sized ziplock bags. I can put 5 boxes of 1,000 in a bag. I also keep powder in ziplock bags. I can put 2, 1 pound bottles in a ziplock. I use separate plastic storage bins for each. Desiccant in the primer and powder bags can be a great help in keeping moisture under control. Completed ammo is stored in 50cal ammo cans, some in plastic cartridge holders, some just lose in the ammo can.
    As for your attic work space, heat is not so much a factor for your supplies as it is your comfort while working there. To me the important thing is how humid is it up there? Maybe you could consider a small window AC unit or a dehumidifier.

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    Member Array chiltech500's Avatar
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    Yes have a/c, more concerned about heat when I'm not using the room. Humidity is what it is on the east coast only heavy a few weeks in the summer.

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    My loading bench and supplies are in my garage, and here in AZ it's over 100 in there every day for months. Haven't noticed a problem.
    Smitty
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    Quote Originally Posted by chiltech500 View Post
    I've just started reloading and the Lyman manuals talks about seperating supplies, powders, primers etc. Are they being legally cautious or is there some validity to it?

    In looking at pictures on the "show your workbench thread" and it looks like most folks have all their supplies around their bench. I would sure love to keep all my supplies and completed rounds as in the pics.

    I'm using a finished part of my attic and in summer it might get up to 95-100 deg. Is that a problem with primers, powders, completed rounds?

    Thanks
    I dont know why the manual says to keep things seperated, maybe they start gang wars or something.
    Hummidity is the only problem youll have working in an attic, the tempature has to get up to about 400 degrees for powder or primers to ignite, and if the tempature is 400 degrees, you have other problems to worry about, like, your house burning down.
    weekend pre-apocolypse nomadic warrior, leather duster and all.

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    I keep my supplies segregated for more of a means of organization than a fear that they will spontaniously ignite one-another.

    I have a bunch of big red metal containers. Notice- bullets, bullets to be loaded, and primers but powder is seperate in a different container.


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    Member Array chiltech500's Avatar
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    I dont know why the manual says to keep things seperated, maybe they start gang wars or something.
    LOL

    Thanks guys. The attic is probably the driest room in my house. We don't have central air but use individual room a/c's., which we only use a few weeks in July typically.

    I've kept my loaded factory rounds and primers in 50 cal ammo boxes in a cooler bedroom, don't have powder yet. Now I'm not afraid of keeping my reloading stuff in the attic. The lower floor bedroom used for rounds was for convenience as much as storage.

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    I have a steel cabinet for primers and powder. A second steel cabinet holds loaded ammunition.

    There's a national fire code recommendation for storage of block and smokeless powder; I don't remember the specs offhand, but it's probably searchable. They seemed entirely reasonable to me. There's also a spec for wooden cabinets.

    Neither powder nor loaded ammunition are particularly dangerous in a fire - I've tested both in campfires - but I figured if I stayed with fire code recommendations, it would be one less thing for the insurance weasels to try to use to avoid paying out on a claim.

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    VIP Member Array BigJon10125's Avatar
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    Getting into it as well myself. As of now its all on a shelf in the garage.

    I like to store complete ammo in ammo cans with a fresh, or freshly baked desicant pack
    BigJon


    "Better to keep your mouth shut and be thought a fool than to open it and remove all doubt" ~ Mark Twain

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    Just a thought, I added a gable-end fan in one house with attic storage, and a large window fan in my other house with a finished attic (neither had central AC). In each place it was a 'puller' or exhaust fan, pulling air in from the cooler end of the house and exhausting it to the warmer side. During the heat of the day there wasn't a big drop in temp, but the moving air made the space tolerable. Once the sun went down, though, 'pumping' the attic with cooler air made a difference by reducing the residual heat conducted/radiated into the rest of the house.
    Smitty
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    Member Array chiltech500's Avatar
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    Thanks guys. gasmitty thanks for the fan advice. I have thought about it but never implemented. My first floor stays quite reasonable except those few weeks in July. I'm almost afraid of pulling the cool air up and out...is that a legitmate thought?

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    I keep powder and primers in a plastic footlocker in the house. Everything else is in the garage

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    Distinguished Member Array airslot's Avatar
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    Primers stored in a wood cabinet above bench with dies ( separate shelf ).

    Powder in a heavy vented steel cabinet under bench.

    Bullets, brass and more powder in a custom made wood cabinet across room.

    Completed rounds go into new boxes Handgun | Ammo Boxes by Cal and then ammo cans. The boxes make for a more professional end result and uniform size for storage.


    Plastic tubs/bins ,while convenient, do pose a risk of static buildup/discharge.
    The situation will NEVER BE THE WAY YOU WANT, it WILL BE THE WAY IT IS. You must be FLEXIBLE ENOUGH TO ADAPT and just "DEAL WITH IT".

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