Starting reloading

Starting reloading

This is a discussion on Starting reloading within the Reloading forums, part of the Defensive Ammunition & Ballistics category; Hey guys, I've never reloaded but have always wanted to start to save money and shoot more. Could you guys help me out and tell ...

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    Member Array cltyus1's Avatar
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    Starting reloading

    Hey guys, I've never reloaded but have always wanted to start to save money and shoot more. Could you guys help me out and tell me what all I need in order to start reloading my . 45 and 9mm? Do they sell a starter kit with everything needed in it? Thank you

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    VIP Member Array pittypat21's Avatar
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    Also - make sure you get a current reloading manual.
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    Member Array cltyus1's Avatar
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    Thank you! I have a lot to learn

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    VIP Member Array Ghost1958's Avatar
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    Makes two of us though I have settled on the Lee single stage kit. Still have to buy the dies for the caliber but im only doing 9mm. Powder however seems to be a rather rare thing for pistol loading as far as I can tell. We shall see which one of us blows ourself up first LOL
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    VIP Member Array NONAME762's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pittypat21 View Post
    Also - make sure you get a current reloading manual.
    Sometimes called a Recipe Book where Rednecks are to be found.
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    Member Array Skidboot's Avatar
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    I'm right where you are as I have a ton of brass to use. I'm looking at the Lee's $176 kit called the 50th anniversary or something like that. Seems like the best bang for the buck in terms of getting started. I plan on doing most .40 and .45 cal.

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    Distinguished Member Array Recon1342's Avatar
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    Shouldn't this be in the reloading sub forum? Lotsa knowledge over there...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Recon1342 View Post
    Shouldn't this be in the reloading sub forum? Lotsa knowledge over there...
    Yup, moved to reloading forum.
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    OP, get a reloading manual first, one with good instructions that will show you the basics. That should explain what is needed and show some accessories as well. The costs and variations in the equipment available is endless.

    My suggestion is to start simple--a single-stage press and the bare necessities. Most starter kits have that and maybe a few extras. There's no need to start out with all the top-end equipment. You may find reloading is not for you. It's simple, but does require your full attention to avoid mistakes.
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    Senior Member Array darbo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cltyus1 View Post
    Hey guys, I've never reloaded but have always wanted to start to save money and shoot more. Could you guys help me out and tell me what all I need in order to start reloading my . 45 and 9mm? Do they sell a starter kit with everything needed in it? Thank you

    Sent from my SPH-L710 using Tapatalk
    Well there is your first misconception! You will do one or the other! LOL Most likely you will have about the same investment, as buying factory, but will enjoy shooting more. In time you will find that reloading is its own hobby and learning experience that supports you shooting. They make a great combo.

    As has already been said, buy a good manual, Lyman's 49th, Hornady 9th, Lee 2nd all good. I have all 3 and use all 3.
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    VIP Member Array high pockets's Avatar
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    This thread has reminded me, I should go downstairs and load a couple hundred more rounds.

    Reloading can be fun, and economical, but recovering the initial costs can be daunting. If you plan to load a lot, it will be cost saving in the long run, but if you only plan to shoot a couple hundred rounds a year, it might be better to just buy your ammunition. An old adage says; "One of the first things reloaders learn is that you don't really save money reloading, you just get to shoot more for the same cost!"

    I once calculated the costs and discovered in my instance, I needed to load approx 2,000 rounds in order to amortize my initial costs. Of course that was 15 years ago. Since I was shooting competitively at the time, I decided that was entirely appropriate. Now that all my equipment has paid for itself, I load 9mm for about $11.00/100, so it can certainly be economical.

    Breaking with the common thought on this board, I started out with very good equipment and went with a progressive loader. Of course I had other local reloaders to help me through the start-up learning curve.

    I agree wholeheartedly with those that have suggested getting a reloading manual, in fact, I encourage you to get several. I understand the Lyman 49th edition is supposed to be very good. I have several books, myself, but not the Lyman.

    Although I got into reloading for the economics of it, many reloaders (mostly rifle people) get into the activity in order to develop the "perfect" round. Once I learned which powders and bullets maximize the accuracy of my guns, I have pretty much standardized my loads and now emphasize the economy of reloading versus purchasing over the counter.

    However you decide to proceed, remember to enjoy yourself, and BE SAFE. As always, remember we are dealing with explosive, flammable, material, and inattention or carelessness can be very dangerous.

    Check out: http://www.handloads.com/calc/loadingCosts.asp
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  13. #13
    agalindo
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    Next thing you'll be casting bullets. :)
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    Im really wanting to get set up for that. Have some lead, and a LEE smelting pot/furnace from when I was in 1st or 2nd grade that the family used to make fishing sinkers.

    I do need to get some molds.

    Quote Originally Posted by agalindo View Post
    Next thing you'll be casting bullets. :)

  15. #15
    VIP Member Array StormRhydr's Avatar
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    Most have told you to get a reloading manual, or a Recipe Book. I say get as many as you can reasonably afford. Also older editions of the same manuals are always nice, as they often have recipes in them that are not included in newer editions, and in a time of hard to find powders, give you other options.

    I REALLY like the LEE manual. They do not just stick to lee components, like maybe Sierra, or Hornady. My lifetime experience is in shotshell reloading. I started with a lee loader that was all self contained in a little flat box, and you actually hammered home the final crimp on each shell. Oddly enough, it worked just fine, and I have that set from when I was a boy, and its good as the day my father brought it home. Classic Lee Loader : Cabela's

    I progressed quickly to MEC single stage loaders. I never saw the need for a progressive loader for shotshell. Of course, shotshell single stage presses are different than rifle or pistol loaders. For shotshell loaders, each shell comes off the press completed. Ie no switching over of dies, or what not.

    Saying all that, this year I bought a Hornady Classic single stage loader. I have no complaints with it, Im sure its whizz bang as all get out. Though I do find myself often cussing the differences in pistol loading and loading shotgun shells, but thats to be expected, I suppose.

    Do know that for most presses you can use a different brand of dies than the press. Ie I use only LEE dies with mine. Mainly because I could find those during the post sandy hook crunch, but also because they make carbide dies that are great for pistol & .223. Ie you dont have to lube the cases then (if Im wrong on this part, someone will surely point it out, lol, but think Im correct).

    This option will be more expensive, but think you should consider it; Go to a RELOADING STORE. Or a good gun store that has a decent reloading department, or reloading guy there. Get them to tell you what you need to get started. I did that this year.

    I knew that I would pay more for things, but online stores were empty, and I didnt know enough to know what I should buy, just starting out. It was reassuring to have some advice on the spot from people who did know. Later, I can reorder supplies from cheaper online sources, once I know what I like and need.

    Personally, I think you are going to spend a whole lot more money than you expect, but then I expect all of us have done the very same thing. Enjoy!

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