Book on ballistics

Book on ballistics

This is a discussion on Book on ballistics within the Reloading forums, part of the Defensive Ammunition & Ballistics category; Is there a book anyone can recommend on ballistics? I want to have a resource on things like what difference bullet weight makes, seating depth, ...

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Thread: Book on ballistics

  1. #1
    Member Array johnaengus's Avatar
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    Book on ballistics

    Is there a book anyone can recommend on ballistics? I want to have a resource on things like what difference bullet weight makes, seating depth, RN or HP, all that different stuff.

    Thanks


  2. #2
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    Hmmm. I, personally, don't know if such an animal exists. A lot of the fine particulars that you are asking for are so dependent on the specific firearm, I don't see how a manual could actually cover things specifically enough to benefit the end user. I think that's where you get into testing and evaluating your own loads in your own firearms rather than reading about them.

    I could be wrong though, so I'm sure others will chime in with anything that might fit the bill.
    flintlock62 likes this.
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  3. #3
    Senior Member Array flintlock62's Avatar
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    I don't know of a book that describes what you are asking exists either. As for seating depth, always abide by reliable reloading manuals from the powder manufacturers. They have the equipment to measure pressure with their powder. Seating depth, bullet weight, case volume, and powder type affects chamber pressure (sometimes very significantly), and it can't be described generically.

    There is information that explains sectional density, and rate of twist. The longer a bullet is in relation to the diameter affects the ROT (rate of twist). A long skinny bullet must spin faster than a short fat bullet to remain stable in flight.
    Last edited by flintlock62; December 31st, 2013 at 04:06 PM.

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