Pistol/rifle rounds reload differentl?

Pistol/rifle rounds reload differentl?

This is a discussion on Pistol/rifle rounds reload differentl? within the Reloading forums, part of the Defensive Ammunition & Ballistics category; I was thinking about bullets that can be used in rifle and handguns such as .357 mag and .44 mag/special particularly. Gunpowder seems to be ...

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Thread: Pistol/rifle rounds reload differentl?

  1. #1
    VIP Member Array BigJon10125's Avatar
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    Pistol/rifle rounds reload differentl?

    I was thinking about bullets that can be used in rifle and handguns such as .357 mag and .44 mag/special particularly. Gunpowder seems to be catered go it's uses for obvious reasons.

    Would you load those calibers differently if you were using it in a rifle vs a handgun specifically? I assume most if not all pistol rounds would be safe in rifles, but would you use different powder because you were shooting them in a rifle than if it were for multi gun use?
    BigJon


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  2. #2
    Senior Member Array GWarden's Avatar
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    Best to stay within the guide lines of a good reloading manual. The manuals will tell you just about all you need to reload. IMHO.
    StormRhydr and flintlock62 like this.

  3. #3
    VIP Member Array BigJon10125's Avatar
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    That, I do GWarden. I just wonder if one would load them differently based on powder characteristics. While I assume a rifle would be able go potentially handle higher pressures I came up with the quesgion based on the fact that there is only one section listing loads (not .44 mag in rifle section and .44 mag in pistol section)
    BigJon


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    VIP Member Array shadowwalker's Avatar
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    Use a reloading manual you can download them from powder mfg. web sites

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    VIP Member Array nedrgr21's Avatar
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    Using a load safe in a rifle, but not a pistol, would really be playing with fire if you own both. Maybe use a slower (relatively speaking) powder in a rifle. What it really comes down to is what is the most accurate or accomplishes your particular objective in your particular firearm.
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    Distinguished Member Array airslot's Avatar
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    8th Edition Hornady manual lists lighter powder charges for rifles in 357. Same powder same bullet.
    The situation will NEVER BE THE WAY YOU WANT, it WILL BE THE WAY IT IS. You must be FLEXIBLE ENOUGH TO ADAPT and just "DEAL WITH IT".

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    VIP Member Array glockman10mm's Avatar
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    The pressure perimeters are pretty much the same, although you don't have to worry as much about shaking your gun loose over extended periods of firing, or forcing cone erosion with a rifle.

    You can load them both with the same powder. But here's the thing;
    Faster burning powders that work ok in shorter tubes, may burn to quickly in a long one, and not give optimal velocity.
    Additionally, if you are using a slow burning powder like H110 or 2400 to move lead bullets to maximum velocity out of a short tube, the longer barrel of a rifle may give you leading problems due to the longer burn time on the bullet base.

    This is not an absolute, because there are variables involved that require some experience to be able to predict, based on lead composition, rifling type, and so forth. But it's not an issue if you are using jacketed bullets or has checks on lead bullets.
    Jeff F, BigJon10125 and OldVet like this.
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    VIP Member Array BigJon10125's Avatar
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    Thank you Glockman, I guess the question was not as clear as I would have hoped, but that answers it. I would not deviate from the manuals, which I have, but just wondered if there was a benefit to exploiting the barrel length of a rifle in more ways than merely length of barrel = naturally greater velocity, with the concern that it would not be A. safe, or B. detrimental to the performance of said round in a pistol
    BigJon


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    The key thing if making loads specifically for rifle or pistol is to not mix them up. Glockman knows of what he speaks.

    (Now I've got to go gargle.)
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    Senior Member Array FLSlim's Avatar
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    Many manuals have separate rifle/pistol loads for those calibers, don't count on internet opinions. I would say, as a general rule, for a rifle, use slower burning powders to get best results (longer barrel and more time to completely burn the powder)
    Chose a weapon that goes bang EVERY time!

  11. #11
    Distinguished Member Array coffeecup's Avatar
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    If you have both a pistol and a rifle in the same caliber the safest thing to do is to load to a level that is safe for both. I have a 38/357 rifle and revolvers in both 38 Special and 357 mag. It would be far too easy to load 38 Specials a little "warmer" for the rifle and then forget which ones they are and load up a cylinder in the 38 Special with the wrong stuff.

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