Batching your brass

Batching your brass

This is a discussion on Batching your brass within the Reloading forums, part of the Defensive Ammunition & Ballistics category; I batch my brass into once fired factory brass and twice or more fired older brass. The once fired I keep separate so that I ...

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Thread: Batching your brass

  1. #1
    Ex Member Array DetChris's Avatar
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    Batching your brass

    I batch my brass into once fired factory brass and twice or more fired older brass.

    The once fired I keep separate so that I ream the primer pockets. I also tend to run thru all the once fired brass first before starting to use my twice or more fired brass.

    My twice or more fired brass are inspected more thoroughly for damage or case splitting and I obviously don't need to ream these as much. I also pay closer attention to case length as they could have elongated with repeated resizing.

    Do you batch your brass? And for what reasons?


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  2. #2
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    Used to, don't any more. With handgun brass, it's good to go until the mouth splits, and that takes a while. For rifles, I've never had a head separation, maybe due to the fact I don't stuff them to the max. I've had a few neck splits, both on fairly new and reused many times. With all, after cleaning, sizing, trimming if needed, I try to give cases a quick looksee and scrap what looks like a potential problem.

    I've never been able to notice any difference with mixed brass on the target. Maybe if I was into 1000 yard matches I might be more particular, but not otherwise.
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    I have never had to size handgun brass only rifle. Actually I have hardly ever cleaned the pockets. I have bins on my bench that hold around 700 cases in ea caliber I reload the rest are in sealed cans in storage. I do not separate brass by age or number of reloads just inspect for splitting while loading. I can clean 9mm 38spl and .380 at the same time they do not fit into ea other but .45 has to be done by themselves. One thing I do is I have a dillion case gauge for all calibers I reload if it fits it will chamber much faster an easier than using calipers.
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    Once fired brass is sized, clean and stored until the other stuff is "worn out". I generally don't sort handgun brass. My loads are so light that I do not worry about case volume. Older, handgun, brass is used until I start getting 5% or so split cases, then the whole batch it is discarded and the once fired stuff put into service.

    I treat some calibers of rifle brass a little differently. My last purchase of 6MM B.R. ammo was 500 rounds of the same lot number. I did the same for .22-250 and .220 Swift.
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    Senior Member Array CWOUSCG's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DetChris View Post
    I batch my brass into once fired factory brass and twice or more fired older brass.

    The once fired I keep separate so that I ream the primer pockets. I also tend to run thru all the once fired brass first before starting to use my twice or more fired brass.

    My twice or more fired brass are inspected more thoroughly for damage or case splitting and I obviously don't need to ream these as much. I also pay closer attention to case length as they could have elongated with repeated resizing.

    Do you batch your brass? And for what reasons?


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    I used to. When I was shooting silhouette I had a very hot load that was also very accurate. I would get case separation when ejecting (Super BHawk) if I loaded them at that charge more than twice.
    Other than that I haven't.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Array FLSlim's Avatar
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    I do that with rifle brass, but pistol-no. In fact I doubt I've had any once fired pistol brass, except random range pick-up (and then who knows?), for years.
    Chose a weapon that goes bang EVERY time!

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    Yes,
    I keep all the once factory, once reloaded, twice reloaded ( shot 3 times) ,third reload and so on. depending on the type of gun and caliber. Revolvers and bolt action get more reloads the semi autos gets scraped much faster.

    I do some extra work to the once fired factory or new brass. The once reloaded to the third reloaded is pretty simple but the more I reload it the more checks and inspections I must perform.

    All my brass is separated by the usage. I have many different loads from mild to compacted. I try and work up loads as mild as I can get away with for the purpose but some match ammo that I must build can be hot at times.
    Fast is fine, but accuracy is everything.
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  8. #8
    VIP Member Array Bad Bob's Avatar
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    Like several here, only rifle brass. I separate 30-06 into commercial or military, they have different properties and get loaded different.
    My rifle and pistol are tools, I am the weapon.

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  9. #9
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    I do for all.

    Pistol is not necessary but I'm a GEEK.

    Rifle you really should.
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  10. #10
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    Only rifle brass here.
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  11. #11
    Senior Member Array hdhnict's Avatar
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    I batch my rifle brass. My rifle is a .303 Enfield. I neck-size only. So most of the stretch happens on the first firing.
    Some thinner brands are likely to fail after 3rd firing. Those are scrapped along with any brass that looks questionable.
    I don't mind a separation when I'm shooting benchrest. But, I had one break when my daughter was shooting at a 3-gun match. She shoots ONLY fresh brass now! I will shoot 1st or 2nd reloads, but not anything older at matches.

    For pistols, I scrap when the mouth splits, or when it has corrosion spots.
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  12. #12
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    The once-fired is saved for special. Beyond that I don't much worry about it. Except for the .220 Swift and the .357 Magnum, .41 Magnum, and .44 Magnum. For some reason I keep a closer tally of number of firings of those cartridge cases so as not to mix old tired brass into the process when making up some full-powered handloads. I've never tossed any cases of the four mentioned as being too far gone though. Just relegate them to milder target handloads.

    I've gone all weird lately. I can't seem to find time to prepare large batches of handloads at a sitting so I "load as I go" making up smaller batches as required for immediate shooting needs. I've gotten in the habit of sorting by head stamp. I found myself in there earlier this evening with 200 .38 Special cases, 50 each of four different head stamps. I'm only making a quick batch of plinking loads for the upcoming weekend. In the past I would have boxed it all as mixed brass loads. Now I'm sorting it into the four boxes by head stamp.

    Neither my shooting abilities nor the guns will notice the accuracy difference in sorting or mixing.

    A wast of time? Pride in one's work? Compulsive disorder? Who knows?
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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by hdhnict View Post
    I batch my rifle brass. My rifle is a .303 Enfield. I neck-size only. So most of the stretch happens on the first firing.
    Some thinner brands are likely to fail after 3rd firing. Those are scrapped along with any brass that looks questionable.
    I don't mind a separation when I'm shooting benchrest. But, I had one break when my daughter was shooting at a 3-gun match. She shoots ONLY fresh brass now! I will shoot 1st or 2nd reloads, but not anything older at matches.

    For pistols, I scrap when the mouth splits, or when it has corrosion spots.
    You are correct to handle your .303 in that fashion. I forgot about that one. I feed three different .303s and have fed others in the past. All exhibit "long" and oversized chambers and your neck-sizing is just the thing for milking the cases for a bit longer service. I've also found that incipient case head separations are frequently apparent after only three firings. I keep up with .303 brass. I also always seem to have trouble maintaining supplies on hand due to case attrition.
    Charter Member of the DC .41 LC Society "Get heeled! No really"

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