Powder Storage: How hot is too hot?

Powder Storage: How hot is too hot?

This is a discussion on Powder Storage: How hot is too hot? within the Reloading forums, part of the Defensive Ammunition & Ballistics category; Most powder canisters say on the label, "store in a cool, dry place." I always have done that, but now, we have moved to our ...

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Thread: Powder Storage: How hot is too hot?

  1. #1
    Member Array ETXhiker's Avatar
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    Powder Storage: How hot is too hot?

    Most powder canisters say on the label, "store in a cool, dry place." I always have done that, but now, we have moved to our place out in the country. My new reloading space is in a store room that doesn't have air conditioning. As most know, Texas summers can get pretty rough. I have accumulated quite a few pounds of powder in the last several years and I'm wondering - is this going to kill my powder supply in short order, or will it take a while to have an effect? Would storing it in an igloo ice chest keep the temps more even? Just wondering if anyone has any direct experience with this, thanks.
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    VIP Member Array DingBat's Avatar
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    I would think moisture is big deal. bullets will still fire after getting VERY hot. heck, they'll fire right up to the point of, and including "cooking off". so I doubt it's the heat itself that kills the powder. I think it's the moisture that comes with humidity, and the moisture that comes with temperature fluctuation.

    Silica packets. - now, I don't know if it's ok to put silica directly in with the powder, or if it is keep the kegs in a sealed container of some sort and then put the desiccant in there.

    ??
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    VIP Member Array OldVet's Avatar
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    Here's the SAAMI recommendations. I read somewhere to keep it under 150 degrees. I doubt your storage room will exceed that, but maybe. If it's a concern, you might keep the powder in the house A/C and only take what you need to do reloading and return it to the house afterwards.

    http://www.saami.org/specifications_...ess_Powder.pdf
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    Thanks, guys! If the limit is 150 degrees, I should be safe. The store room is wood, not metal and has windows I can open to let air circulate. I doubt it will get much hotter than the outside temperature. And come to think of it, I doubt the ammo storage in Iraq was air conditioned either.
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    VIP Member Array OldVet's Avatar
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    That might be ammunition storage for the 150 degrees. Here's the SAAMI recommendations for that.

    http://www.saami.org/specifications_...ess_Powder.pdf
    msgt/ret and ETXhiker like this.
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    Thanks, OldVet.
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    Distinguished Member Array Bigsteve113's Avatar
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    My Dad had an 8 pound keg of Unique stored in his outside workshop, no climate control, in South Louisiana for 30 years. I found it 2 years ago while cleaning out the shop after he passed. I've been using this powder for the last 2 years. Loaded thousands of rounds of .38, .45, 9 mm, and .40. I've had zero issues! Every round **** just fine. Chrono showsvno appreciable difference in the old and new Unique!

    BTW, found some old primers along with the powder.......they all worked perfectly fine too !
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    I have been lucky to keep all my powder in a conditioned air zone. Also, the openings to all of my canisters of powder have a very good seal on the top of the powder drums. The Unique has a nice screw on seal cap that is about 1 inch in diameter and has 3 thread to seal. The AA series has a larger opening that includes a cap topping sealer that covers the top and then the cap seals it. My loading area/bench has very low humidity as noted by the temp/humidity gauge that I keep in the room. I have never had an issue with powder or primers. I have read that powder that has gone bad has an acrid odor to it.
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    If you notice the odd can of powder go up in a huge fireball with a lot of smoke, the place you're keeping it might be too hot.

    I've used some powders with know history but garage/storage building kept through many Texas summers with perfect satisfaction.
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    Distinguished Member Array coffeecup's Avatar
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    When my mom passed away in 2007 at the age of 90 we cleaned out her home of many years and found a 12 lb keg of Green Dot that I stored in her attic when I went into the military in Feb.1959.

    Still good to go !!!!!! I used the last of it a couple years ago.

  11. #11
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    Moisture is the biggest danger to powder in my opinion. As many others have noted, powder can be stored for many years with hot temperatures without damage. Your idea of storing in a cooler in the storage building may give you added security against moisture.
    If it don't seem like it's worth the effort, then it probably ain't.

  12. #12
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    My Dad had an 8 pound keg of Unique stored in his outside workshop, no climate control, in South Louisiana for 30 years. I found it 2 years ago while cleaning out the shop after he passed. I've been using this powder for the last 2 years. Loaded thousands of rounds of .38, .45, 9 mm, and .40. I've had zero issues! Every round **** just fine. Chrono shows no appreciable difference in the old and new Unique!
    I am glad to hear from some reloaders with person experience with hot powder storage. Sounds like I don't have much to worry about. Cool! Thanks, everyone!
    Bigsteve113 likes this.
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