Prices to start reloading??

Prices to start reloading??

This is a discussion on Prices to start reloading?? within the Reloading forums, part of the Defensive Ammunition & Ballistics category; I've thought about, getting into reloading, quite some time, now. All the prices, I get from people, are all over the place. I'm planning on ...

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Thread: Prices to start reloading??

  1. #1
    Member Array ENSANE1970's Avatar
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    Prices to start reloading??

    I've thought about, getting into reloading, quite some time, now. All the prices, I get from people, are all over the place. I'm planning on investing, in some, good books on reloading, I just want to get a realistic idea, on how much I should set aside, to purchase a good, quality setup. For right now I'd be reloading .380, 9mm luger and .45acp. Any information would be greatly appreciated.
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  2. #2
    Member Array 2400's Avatar
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    Are you interested in a single stage or progressive press?

    Are for manuals, get several you can never have too much info. In addition to the powder and bullet manufacturer's manuals take look at Pet Loads from Ken Waters.
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  3. #3
    VIP Member Array frankmako's Avatar
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    first start with books. then i would look into used equipment. ebay has some good deals on single stage presses and dies, etc.... start out slow, and later on you can move up to the big $$$$ if you wish. i have several single stage and progressives presses, but my first, a 1970 texas star single press stills get a lot of work. most of my equipment is used, hard to mess up reloading equipment.
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  4. #4
    Distinguished Member Array coffeecup's Avatar
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    You can get started with decent new equipment for a couple hundred dollar bills. Lee makes OK stuff,(not the very best,but good enough).

  5. #5
    Member Array mousehunter's Avatar
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    Prices vary, wish I could find my original excel sheet.

    I used a Lee Loadmaster (top of Lee's line), it is a picky bit of equipment, but loads well when you get use to it and do your part.

    Loadmaster was about 225, case feeder was probably another $10, $75 on a nice tripple beam, Shellplates and dies run about $50 per caliber, tumbler is 75, got a harbor frieght caliper for $15, hand primer and shell holders was another $40. Total of $550 (darn, forgot reloading manuals. I started with 2 so add another $40)

    Eventually you will want a powder trickler ($10), case lube and pad ($10), and a bullet puller ($15).

    You can get cheaper if you go single stage (I think Lees starter kit is probably about $100 or so and dies (w/o turret press shellplate) are probably about $25 a caliber - very possable to start under $200 (not counting consumables - powder, primers, bullets, etc...). Adding the tumbler latter.

    Or if your budget is there you can spend more and go Blue.
    Last edited by mousehunter; October 23rd, 2007 at 02:42 PM.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Array blueyedevil's Avatar
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    I've said it before, you can't go wrong with the Lee hand press for pistol, and it only costs around $20 bucks. Dies $20-30 a piece, scale $20-200, calipers $20-50, tumbler and media $30-100, case trimmer $20-200, manuals $20-30, loading blocks funnels and other little cheap tools $20. So you could get all set up to reload for all three calibers for as little as $200 bucks or the sky's the limit if you want gucci power trimers, a dylon progressive press and a chargemaster powder measure/scale.

  7. #7
    Member Array 1911NM's Avatar
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    If you want to go upscale, Dillon has some package prices on their website. I am linky impaired, but google will get you there.
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  8. #8
    Member Array amlevin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ENSANE1970 View Post
    All the prices, I get from people, are all over the place.
    Reloading equipment is like cars. You can start with a $300 used car or go for a $250,000 Italian Sports Car.

    Reloading equipment can be bought for under $100 or you can go for a Dillon 1050 and have close to $2,000 invested with the goodies.

    If you are truly a beginner it makes more sense to buy a LEE Anniversary Kit for about $100. You can then LEARN the basics of reloading. Make a box or two of ammo per session. Then, after you have somewhat mastered the basics, and you have determined what your ammo needs are, consider a progressive. LEE Classic for a the mid hundred or a Loadmaster for a little more than $200. No matter what, you will always have a need for that old single stage you learned on. Either to work up loads before you go into "production mode" or to load a large rifle round that you will only shoot 50-100 in a year.

    If you want a premium progressive (after you have learned on the single stage) look at Dillon. You will need at least a $500 bill to play with a dillon by the time you have it set up properly.

    It's only a matter of money. You can have whatever you can afford.
    The question really is "what do you need".
    ""If I shoot all the ammo I am carrying, I either won't need more or, more won't help me.""

  9. #9
    Member Array mousehunter's Avatar
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    ditto the statement on single stage presses.

    I have often considered just getting one to bolt beside my progressive. I don't mind churning out bulk pistol ammo on the progressive, but when I am working up target loads for my rifles, I am darn near single stage on it anyway.

    Plus the extra $20 for shell plates is a mental block for me to start expanding calibers I reload. Of course a lot of calibers use the same shell plates (such as 45acp, 30-06, and 270 and I think .308)... I will probably never get one, but I think about it sometimes.

  10. #10
    VIP Member Array Tubby45's Avatar
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    Get the Lee Classic Turret press from Kemp's gunshop for $180 shipped WITH DIES. Then add a set of calipers, components, and get loading. Best bang for your buck to get started. Upgrade as you go. You will get 200rds per hour out of the LCT and that is plenty to start out with.

    I started on a Lee hand press, went to the Classic Turret and now have 5 presses. I'm consolidating and keeping my Classic Turret and have a Dillon 550 inbound.

  11. #11
    VIP Member Array edr9x23super's Avatar
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    1) Don't waste your time with Lee and the other brands. Don't have anything against them personally, I owned a couple of Lee progressives and an RCBS, but ended up with a Dillon 550B. Yes, you will fork out some money for it, but it will be well worth the investment.

    2)Mike Dillon has a hammerlock on the progressive reloading business, if you don't believe me, get a copy of Front Sight (the USPSA publication) or the IDPA equivalent and look at the articles concerning their National Championships; easily, 99% of all the reloading machines used are made by Dillon. That should tell you something. And, if you want to make it a Christmas present, Dillon usually offers easy paymant plans to spread out what you will fork out for his machinie. And Dillon's warranty is the best in the business, period. The link is:

    www.dillonprecision.com

    Check it out. You won't be sorry.
    "Guard with jealous attention the public liberty. Suspect everyone who approaches that jewel. Unfortunately, nothing will preserve it but downright force. Whenever you give up that force, you are inevitably ruined". - Patrick Henry

  12. #12
    Distinguished Member Array Haywood's Avatar
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    I don't have room to reload or store all the stuff I would need. I send my brass to get reloaded. The Co. is Mastercast Bullet Co. www.mastercast.net good ammo and service.

  13. #13
    VIP Member Array Tubby45's Avatar
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    First off, Lee Precision got more people started reloading and casting than any other company out there. They make excellent products. I should know I used to make parts for them.

    The fact that Dillons are used by a lot of the IDPA shooters means that a lot of the IDPA shooters like to use Dillon machines. It doesn't make them any better shooters or reloaders or smarter in any way. If the top motorcycle racers rode Honda 1K-RR's, does that mean I should run out and buy a Honda? My ammo loaded in Lee and RCBS machines is just as good as the ammo loaded in a Dillon.

    Hornady has a LNL AP press that is comparable to the Dillon 650 and is $80 cheaper. Same rate of speed, same warranty. Oh, yeah, RCBS has as good a warranty as Dillon. I bought a ton of used RCBS stuff that needed upgrading and parts replacements. RCBS sent me all the parts needed (totaled over $300 worth of stuff) to rebuild the stuff and didn't charge me a single penny. Dillon doesn't replace lost parts but I know first hand Hornady and RCBS do. So much for the No BS Warranty claim.

    Graf's has the 550 for about $50 less than Dillon, and that is the SHIPPED PRICE.

  14. #14
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    Easy Tubby45. Dillon seems to have a decent enough warranty. I have had a few parts replaced by them for me. Not sure if you had a problem with Dillon as far as parts, but most seem to think they are very customer friendly.
    A single stage would be a nice start up press, but if you are looking to mass reload in the future a progressive is much quicker. I have no experience with Hornady presses , but have heard good things.
    I do have a Dillon 550B. I have had a few small problems, but Dillon helped me work them out , quickly.
    You can save some money from re using brass . A lot of pricing depends on what setup, bullets, ect you use. as well as how much supplies you want to buy.
    "In matters of style, swim with the current; in matters of principle, stand like a rock." Thomas Jefferson


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  15. #15
    Senior Member Array sui-juris's Avatar
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    Lee's work well, they're sooo affordable, all their stuff.

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