Looking to Reload

Looking to Reload

This is a discussion on Looking to Reload within the Reloading forums, part of the Defensive Ammunition & Ballistics category; I've been pondering the idea of reloading for awhile now. Can someone point me in the right direction as to where I can find a ...

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Thread: Looking to Reload

  1. #1
    Member Array broknindarkagain's Avatar
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    Looking to Reload

    I've been pondering the idea of reloading for awhile now. Can someone point me in the right direction as to where I can find a basic guide or something like that? And about how much does it cost to get started?
    "The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing."

    Smith & Wesson M&P9c


  2. #2
    Distinguished Member Array sniper58's Avatar
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    The cost can be as low as $80 or much, much higher. I've had a single stage press for a number of years. I use it for my hunting rifle. I just bought (a few months ago) a Lee Turret press for my pistol. It's not the greatest, but the kit cost $104 at Midway.

    Your requirements will depend on your purpose. Single stage costs less. If you want that, I'd recommend an "RCBS Rock Chucker Kit." You get pretty much everything except the caliber-specific dies and tumbler. The turret press doesn't come with the aforementioned either, so you'll need those. Dillon (and other's) progressive presses are more money, but you get more features and benefits (and a much faster, higher quantity process).

    As for components, check this out: 1# of powder is less than $20 (usually) and I can get 127 rifle rounds or 1400 .45 rounds per pound; brass (become a hound and gather everything at the range) or buy brass for around $20-$30 per hundred; primers are $3-$4 per 100; projectiles will depend on what you're reloading. For my .45, I reload Oregon Trail's laser-cast bullets (500 for $60; 1000 for $110 including shipping). For rifle, I use Hornady SST 165 grain and you get 100 for around $25. Nosler and other bullets for heavy game is less than $40 for 50-100, depending on manufacturer. Rifle primers cost about the same as pistol, as does powder.

    After spending $135 for my Lee 4-hole Turret press and dies, I've passed the break-even point and now reload 100 .45 ACP rounds for about $10-$11 per box (compared to WWB at Wally World for $30/100). I hope this helps. Ask more questions - that's the only way you'll learn!
    Tim
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  3. #3
    Member Array johnnyrigger's Avatar
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    well the first step i did was go to the library and look at a Lyman reloading book and read it also look at the ABC of reloading... you can look at youtube.. i have found some good info on there.. ill pm you with my user name so you can check them out.

  4. #4
    VIP Member Array sgtD's Avatar
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    Modern Reloading by Richard Lee is a good book to read to get started. It is a sales tool for Lee, but beyond that it is a great resouce with a wealth of info for the beginner. Of course the members on this site are also a great asset and possess a lot of knowledge and experience. (not me, them. I am pretty new to all this reloading stuff myself)

    The links at the top include good resources. Midway is a great place to shop and get stuff. Their prices are good.

    Every Tuesday they update their clearance page and they have some pretty good deals on there for components and dies. I just bought 100 Hornady 30-30 bullets for $17.99. They have some die sets for around $20. If you have a local source for powder and primers it can help, because shipping hazmat fees are expensive, but that can be overcome by buying in large quantities. I buy my powder and primers at the local gun shop. Most guys place orders and he will hold everyone's order's until he has enough to get a delivery without paying hazmat fees to his supplier. That way we all save $$$.

    Like everything else, you can spend a little or a lot depending on what you want. It also largely depends on the volume of reloading you plan to do.

    For an idea of what a fairly basic set-up cost me and some thoughts I have since pondered, see this post.

    http://www.defensivecarry.com/vbulle...ess-9mm-2.html
    When you've got 'em by the balls, their hearts & minds will follow. Semper Fi.

  5. #5
    Member Array broknindarkagain's Avatar
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    So what kind of risks do I run using reloads?

    What would happen if I were to improperly load a round and not realizing the mistake I made, tried to fire it?

    Is it easy to do, or is it a difficult process?

    I plan on keeping Speer Gold Dots in my pistol when I carry....But I'm thinking reloads would be cheaper to hit the range with...and reloading I would be able to keep a decent stockpile of ammo without destroying my wallet.

    I'm going to be looking up some videos and articles on it....but I figured some input from people who reload would be nice as well
    "The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing."

    Smith & Wesson M&P9c

  6. #6
    Distinguished Member Array sniper58's Avatar
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    The risk is just as if someone at the factory wasn't paying attention and the line loaded a double charge. Handloading is a lot of fun, but it requires you to pay attention and not take any part of the process for granted. Definitely carry good quality factory rounds. For practice, there's a lot of satisfaction in properly rolling your own. Once you start reloading, PAY ATTENTION! If you even suspect you've doulbe-charged a case, stop, inspect it, dump the powder if necessary and start anew with the next one.
    Tim
    BE PREPARED - Noah didn't build the Ark when it was raining!
    Si vis pacem, para bellum
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  7. #7
    Member Array johnnyrigger's Avatar
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    I find that reloading is vary vary full-filling Its a grate stress releaser for me. I just put the radio on and enjoy!! I just love it!!

  8. #8
    VIP Member Array dukalmighty's Avatar
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    As far as 9mm it is impossible to double charge a case,I use unique and 5.0 grns will fill the case about 80% full,you can get a progressive loader and load 1 case at a time until you get the technique down and then have a progressive to crank out rounds faster,or if you start with a single stage you can buy a progressive later and use the single stage for low volume for rifles,or working up a new load.the most important thing is the powder charge,none or too little and you can get a bullet lodged in the barrel,too much and you can blow your gun up,when shooting reloads if the round sounds funny or the recoil is lighter from previous shots ,stop shooting clear the gun IE.remove magazine and any round in chamber,lock slide open then look down barrel to make sure it is not obstructed.If you have a source for lead such as used wheel weights from a tire store you can cast your own bullets,the equipment to start is around 100 to 150 Bucks and my bullets for 45 acp cost about .01 each and no shipping/handling and if I run low I go cast some new ones
    "Outside of the killings, Washington has one of the lowest crime rates in the country,"
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  9. #9
    Distinguished Member Array coffeecup's Avatar
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    My recomendation would be to visit some of the aucton sites on the internet and pick up a slightly used Lee pogressive press and the corresponding dies for the ammo you want along with the needed accessories.(Get some help from an experienced reloader friend in the selection of this stuff).

    I chose a Lee outfit because it can be quickly converted to a single stage loader by removing a few parts, and then back to progressive in just a couple of minutes.(and they are cheap) Good value for the money spent.

    The powder,primers,brass,bullets,etc. you will need are just a matter of shopping around for bargins. Save a few bucks by buying in bulk and LOCALLY if you can.

    ABOVE ALL!!!!!!!----DO NOT assume you can improve on the loading manuals by simply adding a bit more powder or seating just a little deeper. This could result in an INSTANT DISASTER!

    Ask an experienced reloader to come over and help you set up the rig and show you how to use it. Ask his/her advice on manuals,and places to buy the things you will need at the best prices.

    ENJOY!!!!

  10. #10
    Distinguished Member Array sniper58's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by coffeecup View Post
    ABOVE ALL!!!!!!!----DO NOT assume you can improve on the loading manuals by simply adding a bit more powder or seating just a little deeper. This could result in an INSTANT DISASTER!
    Sage advice! Forget the trick loads or "go faster" loads. If anything, work 10% below printed charges and slowly work up to what your gun wants (within specs).
    Tim
    BE PREPARED - Noah didn't build the Ark when it was raining!
    Si vis pacem, para bellum
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  11. #11
    Member Array Jay6's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by broknindarkagain View Post
    So what kind of risks do I run using reloads?

    What would happen if I were to improperly load a round and not realizing the mistake I made, tried to fire it?

    Is it easy to do, or is it a difficult process?

    I plan on keeping Speer Gold Dots in my pistol when I carry....But I'm thinking reloads would be cheaper to hit the range with...and reloading I would be able to keep a decent stockpile of ammo without destroying my wallet.

    I'm going to be looking up some videos and articles on it....but I figured some input from people who reload would be nice as well

    First off do not be scared away by all of the warnings and advice you get on reloading. Yes it is possible to make mistakes that could cause injury to yourself but if you concentrate and take your time you can insure that does not happen 100% of the time. It is a fantastic way to make affordable practice ammo and can be down right fun to do.

    Now what would happen if you improperly loaded a round and fired it would depend on what you did improperly. #1 if you 100% make sure that you do not overload a round the worst thing that can happen is you will have a squib round stuck in your barrel. I had a TON of these when I first got into it. No harm no foul!

    First off I would get a good reloading manual (I got the one from Lee) and read it cover to cover. That will give you all of the information you need to get started. Good luck and hit me up if you have any questions at all!

  12. #12
    Member Array Spoon's Avatar
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    Get a good manual or two. The Lee is good for the basic info, but get a second to use as a cross reference. Hornady has a nice Load Data page. Most powder manufactorers produce a load book too.

    Always start @ the lowest charge and work you way up.

    I bought the Lee Book and got the cheap single stage press for 20.00 back in 98 I guess. I use it still, although I want to move up to the Lee Classic Cast Turret press. I do like the process, so a single stage really works for me. I will decap and swage everything at once, polish, prime w/ my Lee Auto prime, then fill and crimp. I am not really worried about the time it takes, as it is a nice and relaxing thing for me to do.

    There are lots of colors to choose from and everyone has their favorite. Dillion is the most expensive, Lee the cheapest.

    Lee makes great, affordable product and their dies are fantastic. I use Lee dies, but have RCBS dies too but prefer Lee's dies. Powders are subjective and there are only a few choices of primers, I use Winchester. I but my Primers and Powder from gun shows and get 5000 (cs) of primers at a time. It is much cheaper and I never pay shipping or haz-mat fees.

    If you really want to save money get into casting. If you can afford the cost upfront you will save big in the long run.

    I have bought my stuff 1 piece at a time, but I am fully set up for 9mm and 45apc w/ a powder throw dialed in for each so all I have to do is swap for the caliber I am loading, a quick check to verify the charge and I'm off.
    Last edited by Spoon; October 30th, 2008 at 12:10 PM. Reason: content

  13. #13
    VIP Member Array automatic slim's Avatar
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    I don't know if it's still done, but some manufacturers sell reloading kits that come with a press, scale, manual, etc. to get you started. Then you'll need to buy the dies and components (bullets, powder, etc.). I have always used RCBS and LEE products. Once you study the manual, you'll see theres many factors involved in reloading starting with your basics to more complicated techniques. It is fun though, I've been reloading since the late 70's.
    "First gallant South Carolina nobly made the stand."
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  14. #14
    Member Array johnnyrigger's Avatar
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    I think lee has a starter kit like Slim is talking about.

  15. #15
    VIP Member Array dukalmighty's Avatar
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    MidwayUSA — Shooting Supplies, Reloading, Gunsmithing, Ammunition, Gun Parts & Rifle Scopes has Lee reloading kits,you can get everything you need to start reloading for about 85.00 except primers powder and cases.For powder and Primers I buy bulk at www.Powdervalley.com wolf primers are 90.00 for 5000 and 8 pounds of unique powder is around 85.00. 8 pounds of powder will load approx 11,000 rounds there is a 20.00 shipping and 20.00 hazmat for orders up to 48 pounds IIRC,when I bought 1# of unique locally it cost me 18.00+tax and 1000 primers were $32.00
    "Outside of the killings, Washington has one of the lowest crime rates in the country,"
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