Where does my problem lie, Primer seating, Brand..

This is a discussion on Where does my problem lie, Primer seating, Brand.. within the Reloading forums, part of the Defensive Ammunition & Ballistics category; Sounds like bad primers,I never clean my primer pocket and load thousands of rounds they all go bang everytime...

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Thread: Where does my problem lie, Primer seating, Brand..

  1. #16
    VIP Member Array dukalmighty's Avatar
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    Sounds like bad primers,I never clean my primer pocket and load thousands of rounds they all go bang everytime
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  3. #17
    Distinguished Member Array sniper58's Avatar
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    Hi Sticks! C'mon down here - it's warmer (we're only -7). I had the same problem with my Lee 4-hole Turret press. The primers just don't seat deeply enough. I talked with the Lee techs several times and tried everything they suggested - to no avail. The last guy told me to send the whole thing back and they'd fix it (I would have to pay shipping). The easier fix for me was a Lee hand primer. It takes away from the semi-progressive nature of the press, but it works well for the limited volume I reload (still faster than my single-stage RCBS).

    I use Hogden Titegroup and CCI or Winchester primers and have had zero problems (Titegroup has the loads on the label). Good luck and let me know if you continue to have problems.
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  4. #18
    Senior Member Array mech1369dlw's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sticks View Post




    I am using Remington 1 1/2 of unknown age and storage conditions.


    I am willing to bet a case of Mountain Dew and a box of those Oreo Cake like cookies that the primers in some way are the problem. Maybe they got wet at some time, maybe they have oil, maybe a bad batch. Maybe they are 19 3/4 years old. I'll put my money on something wrong with the primers.
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  5. #19
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    You know I have some primers that I know are pushing 40 years old sitting in my loading stuff right now. I use them every now and then and they always go bang. Inherited from granfather and he's been dead almost 30 years and the boxes looked old when I got them. I don't think age has much to do with it if they have been stored properly, of course you really have no way of knowing unless the packaging is showing signs of it.
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  6. #20
    Senior Member Array ntkb's Avatar
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    Sounds to me that your problem is in the seating depth, if the primer isn’t seated fully the firing pin’s energy will be used up moving the primer forward instead of crushing the mix on the anvil. I have seen this with rifles when loaded with too much head space.

    Hard skinned primers can be a problem, to change that replace the main spring or the brand of primers. But get them seated to proper depth.

  7. #21
    Senior Member Array boscobeans's Avatar
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    I'm a single stage reloader. After cleaning and polishing I deprime and resize, and at this point I always take a look to see that the pocket is clean and there is light through the hole.. Very rare to find any blockages from media.

    Sounds like one of four issues 1. Poorly stored primers. 2. Not seated to proper depth. 3. Really hard primers. 4. Weak firing pin strikes.
    bosco

  8. #22
    VIP Member Array Sticks's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by boscobeans View Post
    Sounds like one of four issues 1. Poorly stored primers. 2. Not seated to proper depth. 3. Really hard primers. 4. Weak firing pin strikes.
    bosco

    1. Definite possibility.

    2. Probable, I readjusted the seating depth to a point where the primer pin makes a very slight dent in the primer.

    3. Unlikely, Remington is (so it has been posted) considered soft.

    4. Unlikely, since my weapon will fire everything else I feed it.
    Sticks

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  9. #23
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    Sounds to me that your problem is in the seating depth, if the primer isnít seated fully the firing pinís energy will be used up moving the primer forward instead of crushing the mix on the anvil. I have seen this with rifles when loaded with too much head space.
    I'll second that.

    When primers are properly seated,they cannot move forward. Consistent primer depth is the key here.
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  10. #24
    VIP Member Array dukalmighty's Avatar
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    I think that since primer seating seems to be the general consensus,I would get a lee hand primer and hand prime several cases then load them,if they all go bang then you know what the issue is,if they are all seated fine and you still have several bad ones then I would say it's the primers
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  11. #25
    Member Array gunnerdd2's Avatar
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    instead of double firing the bullet. take one bullet look it over good(primer) put it in the gun and shoot it . if it dont go bang , wait a second , remove the bullet and look at the primer again and see if it has moved and look at the strike mark. put the bullet back in and fire it again , remove shell casing and examine it again and see if it is any differance in the primer. if not, bad primers , if there is a differance it probably is in the seating.......
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  12. #26
    Senior Member Array ntkb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gunnerdd2 View Post
    instead of double firing the bullet. take one bullet look it over good(primer) put it in the gun and shoot it . if it dont go bang , wait a second , remove the bullet and look at the primer again and see if it has moved and look at the strike mark. put the bullet back in and fire it again , remove shell casing and examine it again and see if it is any differance in the primer. if not, bad primers , if there is a differance it probably is in the seating.......
    If you check the case after it has been fired the primer will have been forced into the primer pocket by the pressure of pushing the bullet out of the barrel, it will shove the case against the breach block. You will not see any difference.

    The only experiment that would prove anything is to take a case with a primer that isnít seated correctly attempt to fire it if it doesnít go off, it will show a shallow dent, and the primer will have moved into the base of the cup, causing the next strike of the firing pin to crush the charge in the primer and making it go bang.

    (The problem in this is, it could cause a slam fire, if it is done in an auto loading weapon when the slide is driven into battery)

  13. #27
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    Sticks, was wondering what was the original problem you were having with the primers when you first started using that press. You said there was a weird dent in them. What did you do to remedy that? Just curious as it seems primers are an issue, and wondering if it's related to what's currently going on.
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  14. #28
    VIP Member Array Sticks's Avatar
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    I had a casting flaw on the frame of my press that chewed up the lever that moves the indexing rod out so the handle can push it back in rotating the shell plate.

    I filed down the casting flaw, and tried to smooth out the lever but it was too far gone. My solution for this until I replaced the lever was to make a tensioning rod to keep the indexing rod against the frame so the lever would follow the guides. This was causing a CCW rotation of the shell plate and tipped primers. The weird dent was from a primer that did not get completely tipped, yet not square in the hole either.

    New lever, removed the tensioning rod, and no more tipped primers. The shell plate is rock solid at the top of the ram stroke, and the primer pin is dead center in the shell plate notch.

    My movement of the handle is smooth and firm both up and down, making sure I complete the stroke at both top and bottom. Speed wise, maybe 4 seconds to complete the cycle.
    Sticks

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    A person who is incapable of independent thought; a person who is herd animal-like in behavior; one who cannot distinguish between right and wrong; a foolish person.
    See also Sheep

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