Lee die question

This is a discussion on Lee die question within the Reloading forums, part of the Defensive Ammunition & Ballistics category; I have noticed that while loading 9mm on my progressive press with my Lee dies that the effort required is much greater than when loading ...

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Thread: Lee die question

  1. #1
    Member Array showmebob's Avatar
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    Lee die question

    I have noticed that while loading 9mm on my progressive press with my Lee dies that the effort required is much greater than when loading 380's with Lee dies or 357's with RCBS dies. The effort required is to the point that I'm worried about breaking something or sticking the case in the die. I have checked the adjustments on all the dies used and realize that I'm possibly sizing twice with each stroke because I use the Factory Crimp Die also. (the majority of the resistance is coming from the sizing die)
    I got to looking at the sizer die, then compared it to the sizer die for the 380 and the 357. The carbide section is much longer than on the 380 or 357 dies. Almost twice as long.
    Does anyone know why Lee uses such a long carbide section in the sizer die for the 9mm but not the 380? (the difference is much more than the case length difference) What is the reason for this?

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    VIP Member Array dukalmighty's Avatar
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    I only use a 3 die set and seat and crimp with one die.I adjust my die down to wear it removes the bell from the powder die and crimps just tight enough to where the case will slide in and out of my barrel chamber,I then adjust COAL and start loading.Once your dies are set if you have removable die plates you shouldn't have to move them unless you load a different bullet with different OAL.as far as more resistance there isn't that much
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    VIP Member Array cvhoss's Avatar
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    I'm going to guess that the carbide insert in a Lee die is slightly tapered to match the taper of a 9mm cartridge (yes, the 9mm is tapered) and that's why it's longer than for a case that has a straighter wall. On a progressive press where so much is going on with each pull of the handle, I will spray some Hornady One-Shot on enough cases to make it about 1 in 5 that I'm going to reload. Mix them with unlubed cases and start loading. When you hit a lubed case, the small amount of lube it places inside the die makes the operation much easier until you hit the next lubed case. Works great with my 650 case feeder as I just let the case feeder mix them up. Just makes the whole operation easier and faster.

    Hoss
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    Member Array showmebob's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cvhoss View Post
    I'm going to guess that the carbide insert in a Lee die is slightly tapered to match the taper of a 9mm cartridge (yes, the 9mm is tapered) and that's why it's longer than for a case that has a straighter wall. On a progressive press where so much is going on with each pull of the handle, I will spray some Hornady One-Shot on enough cases to make it about 1 in 5 that I'm going to reload. Mix them with unlubed cases and start loading. When you hit a lubed case, the small amount of lube it places inside the die makes the operation much easier until you hit the next lubed case. Works great with my 650 case feeder as I just let the case feeder mix them up. Just makes the whole operation easier and faster.

    Hoss
    Thanks for the info. I didn't realize that the 9mm was a tapered case. It makes sense now why it would take more effort to resize.
    I had tried Hornady One Shot gun cleaner and lube spraying it on the dies. It helped for a few cases only.
    Does the Hornady case lube make for sticky cases and do you have to remove it after loading?

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    VIP Member Array cvhoss's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by showmebob View Post
    Thanks for the info. I didn't realize that the 9mm was a tapered case. It makes sense now why it would take more effort to resize.
    I had tried Hornady One Shot gun cleaner and lube spraying it on the dies. It helped for a few cases only.
    Does the Hornady case lube make for sticky cases and do you have to remove it after loading?
    Not sure if we're talking about the same stuff since you say "gun cleaner". If you follow the link I provided, the stuff I'm talking about is not a gun cleaner, it's strictly a case lube for use during reloading and it is applied to the cases, not the die.

    When resizing with carbide pistol dies, I use so little of the One Shot (just a very light spritzing) that no, I don't wipe it off and I've never had a problem. The purpose is only to ease the operation as lube is not necessary for carbide pistol dies. If you get too much on the cases, then yes you should wipe it off. If I get too much on a pistol case or if I've been reloading bottleneck rifle cases (lube mandatory), I usually just set down with a bowl of reloads and a cotton rag while watching a movie and wipe them off. I know some people tumble them in their case tumbler to remove lube but I personally won't tumble a loaded round.

    Hoss
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    Member Array showmebob's Avatar
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    Hoss
    The Hornady gun cleaner and lube is not the same as the case lube. I did follow your link to see what you use and of course my local shop only has the gun cleaner and lube. (it is a cleaner and dry lube made for removing oil residue from gun mechanisms and leaving a dry film lube, its good stuff) Hornady recommends using it on their dies and presses.
    I tried using it on the dies just to see what would happen.
    I will try the case lube on the cases as soon as I can find it.

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    Member Array showmebob's Avatar
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    On a progressive press where so much is going on with each pull of the handle, I will spray some Hornady One-Shot on enough cases to make it about 1 in 5 that I'm going to reload. Mix them with unlubed cases and start loading. When you hit a lubed case, the small amount of lube it places inside the die makes the operation much easier until you hit the next lubed case. .

    Hoss

    Since I didn't have the Hornady spray case lube I used Hornady one shot gun cleaner and lube. It worked fantastic. I laid all the casings on their sides and gave them a very light mist of one shot. The effort required to load was significantly reduced to the point I'm not sure if I will even buy the case lube. The gun cleaner and lube dries totally and leaves no evident film, and is not sticky at all. You might want to try this yourself. If you don't like it for case lube it works fantastic on firearms.
    Anyway, thanks for the tip. I would not have tried it otherwise.

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    VIP Member Array cvhoss's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by showmebob View Post
    Since I didn't have the Hornady spray case lube I used Hornady one shot gun cleaner and lube. It worked fantastic. I laid all the casings on their sides and gave them a very light mist of one shot. The effort required to load was significantly reduced to the point I'm not sure if I will even buy the case lube. The gun cleaner and lube dries totally and leaves no evident film, and is not sticky at all. You might want to try this yourself. If you don't like it for case lube it works fantastic on firearms.
    Anyway, thanks for the tip. I would not have tried it otherwise.
    I would advise caution using anything for a case lube that isn't intended for that purpose. If it is petroleum based, you could very easily contaminate your primers or powder and end up with a squib load. Use the right tool for the right job.

    Hoss
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    Member Array showmebob's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cvhoss View Post
    I would advise caution using anything for a case lube that isn't intended for that purpose. If it is petroleum based, you could very easily contaminate your primers or powder and end up with a squib load. Use the right tool for the right job.

    Hoss
    Hoss
    Here is a link to what I used. It seems to be a great lube (even used it on a table saw) non petro based.

    MidwayUSA - Hornady One Shot Gun Cleaner-Degreaser and Dry Lubricant 5.5 oz Aerosol

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