Sucess Story and A Question or 2

This is a discussion on Sucess Story and A Question or 2 within the Reloading forums, part of the Defensive Ammunition & Ballistics category; Well, after reading a lot, asking questions, and even making a few mistakes I finally had a chance to test my first reloads. I was ...

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Thread: Sucess Story and A Question or 2

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    Member Array waketurb007's Avatar
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    Sucess Story and A Question or 2

    Well, after reading a lot, asking questions, and even making a few mistakes I finally had a chance to test my first reloads. I was not testing for anything other then that they safely go bang. They all did although I did have a few FTE's.

    Here is what I reloaded: 9MM, with Berry's 115 grain RN, Clay's powder using LRN data giving me 3.0 grains, OAL of 1.10

    Like I said, I did have a few FTE, anyone have suggestions on why this may have occurred and what to do to prevent this from happening again? Also, how many times can you use the media in a tumbler before it has to be changed? How will you know it needs changed?

    Thanks for all the help.

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    Aghh... it could be several things: from not enough kick to move the slide to improper resizing of the case. Can you tell us type of gun, if you crimp, what reloading equipment do you use, etc?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Miggy View Post
    Aghh... it could be several things: from not enough kick to move the slide to improper resizing of the case. Can you tell us type of gun, if you crimp, what reloading equipment do you use, etc?
    I am using a Dillon 550 with Dillon Dies. I did use the taper crimp and the gun is a S&W sigma. I only shot about 20 rounds as time was limited.

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    Member Array alfack's Avatar
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    You don't need to change the media very often at all, unless you tumble every week or notice it turning black or something. I've been using the same batch of media for the last few years, just add a couple of caps of the Dillon polish each time and go. I think the polish builds up on the media after a while and actually works better.

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    My manuals dont show data for Clays. IF that is the low end load on your tables, and you do not show any signs of excessive pressure, it might be time to add a tenth of a grain and try it again.
    I had some softball loads that drove a buddy crazy. They would cycle fine in my pistol but wouldn't cycle his Glock.
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    Just looking at the Hodgdon reloading data, I would say that your loads are too light for you gun.

    The 115 LRN do show to start out at 3 grains of Clays, but show it is only going to push it at 954 fps, and 25,300 CUP pressure.

    If I look down the chart it shows that the 115 GDHP starts at 3.7 grains of Clays and is pushing it out at 1066 fps and 30,900 CUP.

    I think that less than 1000 fps on a 9mm is really probably way to slow on that light a bullet, especially since many of the loads are upwards of 1100 fps on the tables.
    Just remember that shot placement is much more important with what you carry than how big a bang you get with each trigger pull.
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    VIP Member Array mcp1810's Avatar
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    Based on what Farronwolf posted and assuming your data matches his I would go ahead and bump it up to 3.5 grains myself and test again. Some might even go higher, but at the moment I can't afford to break anything, so I tend to be conservative on my loads.
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    Quote Originally Posted by farronwolf View Post
    Just looking at the Hodgdon reloading data, I would say that your loads are too light for you gun.

    The 115 LRN do show to start out at 3 grains of Clays, but show it is only going to push it at 954 fps, and 25,300 CUP pressure.

    If I look down the chart it shows that the 115 GDHP starts at 3.7 grains of Clays and is pushing it out at 1066 fps and 30,900 CUP.

    I think that less than 1000 fps on a 9mm is really probably way to slow on that light a bullet, especially since many of the loads are upwards of 1100 fps on the tables.
    Thanks for the help. If I understand you correctly since the bullet I have is a 115 grain bullet although a round nose platted bullet, I could use the data for the 115 GDHP.

    The Berry's website recommends that I use the low to mid range jacketed data and keep it below 1200 fps. What about the OAL, should I go with 1.12 according to the load data.

    Thanks for all the help, as you can tell I am new to this stuff.

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    Just try one new thing at a time. I'd bump the charge up and then see what happens. If you are stll having problems then look at your resizing die. I don't think the OAL is a factor here. It might be if you were having feed problems, but I can't see how it would affect extraction.


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    Quote Originally Posted by atctimmy View Post
    Just try one new thing at a time. I'd bump the charge up and then see what happens. If you are stll having problems then look at your resizing die. I don't think the OAL is a factor here. It might be if you were having feed problems, but I can't see how it would affect extraction.


    So are you a pilot or ATC?
    Pilot, I assume you to be ATC....

    Say I increase the charge to 3.6 grains which is above the data for LRN 115 grain bullets, but under the starting charge for the 115 GDHP, if I don't increase the OAL would that not create a situation where the pressure would be to great?

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    VIP Member Array mcp1810's Avatar
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    Part of the reason for the lower loads with lead bullets is depending on the twist rate of your rifling and the hardness of the lead if you push lead too fast it will start peeling off the bullet and filling the rifling grooves. After not too many rounds you can end up with a smooth bore!
    The plated and jacketed bullets are less prone to this. In handgun loads you would probably be having pressure issues before you started ripping the jackets apart.
    You still want to be a bit conservative when switching over to the jacketed data as we don't know how thick or hard the plating is compared to a gilding metal jacket.
    Something to keep in mind, different manufacturers make the same basic design of bullets but there are subtle differences. If you have two bullets with the same weight but different ogives, you will have a different length of the bullet and also a different length of the bullet that is engaging the rifling. Same thing goes for FMJ vs JHP. The different length of the bullet will either increase or decrease your case volume if the bullets are seated to make the cartidges the same overall length. This can affect your pressure. Also the coefficient of friction and amount of bearing surface on the rifling will affect pressure and velocity.
    But you don't have to over think it. The C.O.L. listed in manuals is the minimum. If you are a few thousandths long your pressure and velocity will be a little lower. It is safer to be a little long than a little short. If you want to keep your seating depth in the case the same measure your two bullets, note the difference in length and adjust your C.O.L. accordingly.
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