Savings with reloading

This is a discussion on Savings with reloading within the Reloading forums, part of the Defensive Ammunition & Ballistics category; I would say that you should look at a turret press then. Although the components to make 3000 rds of ammo are going to run ...

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Thread: Savings with reloading

  1. #16
    VIP Member Array farronwolf's Avatar
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    I would say that you should look at a turret press then.

    Although the components to make 3000 rds of ammo are going to run you about 500 bucks, so that doesn't leave you much for a press. 1000 pieces of 9mm 80 bucks, 1000 pieces of 45 130 bucks, 1000 pieces of 38/357 about 100 bucks, 1500 small pistol primers, 1000 large pistol primers and 500 small pistol magnum primers is going to be about 100 bucks, then add in 3 lbs of powder and your up to 500 bucks easy with shipping.

    With turret press you can swap calibers in less than a minute, and you can put out 1000 rds in less than 10 hrs just working at a casual pace.
    Just remember that shot placement is much more important with what you carry than how big a bang you get with each trigger pull.
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  3. #17
    Member Array Laxer's Avatar
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    well...

    maybe ill just take it slow, very slow at first so i can get some funds and get all things working on a regular single stage and maybe just start out with 45 or 9mm...
    Those who would give up essential liberty to purchase a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety. - Benjamin Franklin

  4. #18
    VIP Member Array farronwolf's Avatar
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    Laxer,

    You can get a Lee deluxe kit Lee Precision, Inc. Reloading Tools and Equipment: Anniversary Kit

    for 162 bucks, with extra turrets and dies, you should be able to get half of the ammo you want with the kit and keep it under 500 bucks. After you shoot that 1500 or so rounds you will hopefully be able purchase the stuff for the other half you want to shoot.

    If you straight up buy the 3000 rounds your looking to shoot it will cost you about 800 bucks. So basically, if you buy the press and reload the 3000 rds, you will only have spent the amount of money that it would cost just to buy the 3000 rounds of ammo. The second year, your money ahead.

    There will be some other stuff besides the kit you will need, like a caliper, and manuals, trays, and other stuff that will eat up the other 100 bucks making it even.
    Just remember that shot placement is much more important with what you carry than how big a bang you get with each trigger pull.
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  5. #19
    VIP Member Array frankmako's Avatar
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    i save money no matter how you play with the numbers. that is why i got into reloading in the 70's. i been cheap all my life. i even cast my own bullets using free wheel weights and/or range bullets waste. now that is cheap.
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  6. #20
    VIP Member Array dukalmighty's Avatar
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    I cast my own lead bullets so my cost per hundred rounds is bullets 1.00,powder is about 1.00,primers 2.00,Brass is free.I reload 100 rounds of 45,40,9mm etc. for about $4.00 100 rounds 45 acp WWB is over $30.00 100,so I save $26.00 on every 100 rounds I shoot.223 I reload for about $15.00 100 rounds,$25.00 less than the 100 round bulk pack in Walmart.
    I have about $3000.00 in bullet casting and reloading equipment I've had for about 3 years and It's already more than paid for itself in savings
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  7. #21
    Senior Member Array Jmac00's Avatar
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    Dillon Precision: Reloaders, Reloading Equipment, Bullet Reloading, Bullet Reloaders

    This machine will pump out 400-600 rounds per hour. This machine will also reload "almost' every pistol and rifle caliber on the market. All you need is the dies.

    This is one stop shopping for every caliber you want. AND there NO BS warranty is just that. if you have a problem with the machine, ship it back and they fix it for nothing (unless you smacked it with a hammer or something like that)

    This machine is VERY EASY to use and set up. It's very smooth and I get very consistent results.

    Good luck on which ever machine you get, if you have questions you can e-mail or PM me. I'll be happy to help you out, hell I help anyone out
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  8. #22
    VIP Member Array sgtD's Avatar
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    The better quality ammo you load, the more you save.

    Just another twist to highlight some potential for bigger savings.

    For plinking you can save money as others have shown, but compare what you are making with the same quality ammo and the savings is big. One thing I look at is that when I reload I am getting real quality ammo, which is much more expensive to buy.

    I do not always do the following, becuase if I'm gonna shoot paper I use lead swc bullets that I get real cheap from a local guy who casts, but many times I make real good ammo for long term storage, and that saves lots of money:

    For instance, a box of WWB .38 spl is cheap, whereas a box of 125gr +p jhp personal defense loads is not. (The good personal defense loads are about $1 each or more, a box of 20 for $20-25). After I shoot up those initial cheap fmj rounds, I reload the cases with good jhp bullets right at +p pressure. Now I have some serious ammo to add to my rainy day collection. ( no I don't carry with handloads, only factory stuff But, if I ever need SD ammo, I would use handloads if I had to.)

    I pay a bit more for my bullets, buying 125gr HPs usually, and can still reload for less than the price of WWB FMJ, or LRN. The cost is only slightly less than the cheap stuff, but a whole lot less considering that I am producing top quality loads.

    If you ever get into it, hunting ammo is where the savings adds up big time, I still save money even over the cheapest hunting ammo I can buy. For instance,Rem. 30-30 150gr core-lockt is cheap at 14.97 per box of 20 rnds. $149.70 per 200 rounds. However, I get my brass for free at the range and from what I've saved over the years, so I can reload 200 rounds of the same ammo for around $60.

    Premium .308 ammo is over $40 per box of 20, and I can make my own for under $7 per box, with premium bullets boosting the cost to somewhere around $9 per box.

    If I could afford to buy powder and bullets in bulk, I could save even more. Plus it's fun. Good luck with whatever you choose.
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  9. #23
    Member Array Laxer's Avatar
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    well i like how the dillion looks, but it looks pretty complicated for a beginner so i think i might start with the turret press,

    thanks for the help here!
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  10. #24
    Senior Member Array Jmac00's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Laxer View Post
    well i like how the dillion looks, but it looks pretty complicated for a beginner so i think i might start with the turret press,

    thanks for the help here!
    The dillon press is VERY EASY to use, never let the looks of something dissuade you from getting it. Instructions are clear (and they have pictures )

    If you have questions about the machine, call them. Dillion has EXCELLENT customer service. Just explain to them your thinking about getting into reloading, there staff is first rate and very knowledgeable.
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  11. #25
    VIP Member Array farronwolf's Avatar
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    sgtD brings up a good point in the high end ammo camparison.

    So far I have only worked through my pistol hunting loads with the .357 and .44 mag. This year I will be working up the loads for rifles in .243, .270, 30.06, 30-30, .32 win spec, and .35 rem.

    I will be saving lots of money once I get some loads tested and find one for each of those calibers that I am satisfied with.

    Of course between all the rifle calibers I won't shoot a fraction of what I do with pistols during the year, but when your talking of saving of over 1 dollar per shot, that will add up pretty darn quick.

    Laxer, take your time do some research, and pick what press you think will work for you. I chose a Lyman Turrret press myself, which I don't have any regrets over, but if I had done some more research I could have very well ended up with a Lee or something else.
    Just remember that shot placement is much more important with what you carry than how big a bang you get with each trigger pull.
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  12. #26
    Distinguished Member Array kazzaerexys's Avatar
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    Laxer,

    The Dillon is pretty easy to get started with. Take a look at this guy's 5-part video on YouTube for setting up a 550B and running some .45 ACP:
    How to reload with a Dillon RL 550B.

    The 550B is probably as much as you'd want as a beginner if you are a little wary, because nothing on the 550B is automated and it can actually be used as a single stage press either for learning purposes or for more exacting work if you use it for more than just plinking.

    I just started with my 550B back in December and I think it was a great starter kit. It'll be more up front than a simpler press, but it will, I think, go further for you; you will be less likely to want to sell it and upgrade in a couple of years than if you started cheaper.

    Last thing I would add, though, is to get the Lee Deluxe Pistol 4-Die sets instead of the Dillon pistol dies.
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  13. #27
    VIP Member Array mcp1810's Avatar
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    Something to keep in mind is that you can load .38special and .357magnum with the same shell holder and dies. You just need to make some minor adjustments. One of the other things you can do to save even more on plinking ammo is to use cast lead bullets instead of FMJ or JHP. Also, after you get a reloading manual take a look at the tables and check out the powder charges for each cartridge you plan on loading. There are 7000 grains in a pound. I see one load in one of my books where for the same bullet in .38special I can use either 3.6 grains of 700X or 7.0 grains of AA#7 to achieve the same velocity. If they cost the same per pound, and I am not trying to get the perfect load, I can cut my powder cost in half almost by going with the 700X.
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  14. #28
    Senior Member Array Landric's Avatar
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    Check out the Lee Classic Turret kit from Kempf's, about $200 with the upgrades (you want both upgrades for $22):

    https://kempfgunshop.com//index.php?...mart&Itemid=41

    You would just need to add a scale, manual, tumbler or ther method to clean brass, bullet puller, and calipers.

    Its not a flashy as a Dillon, but its a very good press, easy to learn, reasonably fast, and easy and cheap to change calibers.

    If you don't have brass, pick it up on the range or buy it used. I never buy new brass unless its simply unavailable on the range or for sale once-fired (like .44 Russian).

    I'd start with whatever caliber you shoot most, get primers, bullets, powder, and the kit and go from there. You should easily come in under $500.

    As far as the original question goes, I generally save at least 50% over the per round cost of factory ammo, and often a lot more. Not to mention that I make much better ammunition than what is availbe cheap (like WWB or Wolf).
    -Landric

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