Is reloading 9mm a cost effective option?

This is a discussion on Is reloading 9mm a cost effective option? within the Reloading forums, part of the Defensive Ammunition & Ballistics category; I have never done any reloading but have shot all my life including competatively. I know there is a real value to reloading non-standard ammo ...

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Thread: Is reloading 9mm a cost effective option?

  1. #1
    Senior Member Array LeCalsey's Avatar
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    Is reloading 9mm a cost effective option?

    I have never done any reloading but have shot all my life including competatively. I know there is a real value to reloading non-standard ammo and especially large hunting cartridge ammo. Even in these times though, I can't see spending the money for all the gear needed to reload if it will be primarily 9mm or 45. The ammo (while not exactly cheap) is ont that outrageous and some bulk ammo can be had for practice. I realize that all may change in the near future...who knows but Hussein

    What would the cost per round be for reloaded 9mm or 45? I can buy ball 9mm for $0.22 each and 45 for $.25 each at my local shooting supply.
    2A is not negotiable

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  3. #2
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    That depends. The biggest saving come from buying in bulk.

    I usually by bullets in bulk, 1000 at a time and primers, 5000 at a time.
    The biggest cost is in brass, if you save yours, the cost gets lower each time you use it.

    Consider that the bullets I bought last year, are cheaper than the same bullets are this year.

    Also consider that the you can tailor loads for each individual firearm.

    The equipment is expensive, but the more you use it, the less it becomes. If you have been shooting all of your life and still intend to do so, you ought to invest in the equipment.

    If you just shoot a few boxes a year, then its probably not cost effective.

    On the other hand, if you shoot thousands a year like I do, then its crazy to not reload because you'll spend a fortune.

    Using brass that I had, and using bullets that I cast, a primer is about 2 cents and the powder say, 20$ a pound, which is 7000 grains per pound, with an average load of 6 grains, it comes out to 1.7 cents for the powder. So, that would be 4 cents per round if you had the brass,cast the bullets and bought the primers.

    Now, if you buy the bullets, say 10.00 per hundred,or .10 cents per bullet, that would raise your cost up to a whopping 14 cents.
    I would rather stand against the cannons of the wicked than against the prayers of the righteous.


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    VIP Member Array dukalmighty's Avatar
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    the only thing I buy is powder ,primers,and lead wheel weights,to cast into bullets,I buy primers by 5000 sleeves and about 30,000 at a time to combine shipping and hazmat fees,I buy powder by 8 Lb kegs and as much as I can get on one shipping fee usually 32 Pounds at a time,I reload 100 bullets for around 4 to 5 cents per bullet,Walmart wants almost 20.00 for 100 rounds FMJ 9mm
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    Member Array trapper T's Avatar
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    As has been stated, it depends on how much you shoot. My equipment paid for itself many years ago. I load what I want for plinking or hunting.

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    Quote Originally Posted by trapper T View Post
    As has been stated, it depends on how much you shoot. My equipment paid for itself many years ago. I load what I want for plinking or hunting.
    +1

    I reload .38, .357, 9mm, .44spl, .44 mag, .45ACP, .223, and 30:06.
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    Senior Member Array LeCalsey's Avatar
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    Does anyone have a good basic starter set-up that you could recommend?
    2A is not negotiable

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    Quote Originally Posted by LeCalsey View Post
    Does anyone have a good basic starter set-up that you could recommend?
    It all depends on how much and how often you're going to reload.

    My first and still current machine is my Dillon Square Deal B, can't recommend it highly enough. Just remember it's for reloading handgun rounds only. You will also receive recommendations for a single stage press. These are fine if reloading in small volumes but will become frustrating if you're trying to do it in any quantity.

    Check out Dillon Precision: Reloaders, Reloading Equipment, Bullet Reloading, Bullet Reloaders and look around.
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    Senior Member Array boscobeans's Avatar
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    I have been reloading for over 30 years. 9mm,38spl,.357mag,45ACP and .44mag for pistols. I no longer reload rifle calibers but did for a few years back when I hunted.

    After a few visits to a range I decide to get set up and roll my own.

    I use a single stage system and in a few hours I have several boxes ready for the next range visit.

    The loads I have worked out use bullet configurations, velocities and muzzle energies that mimic most commercial rounds so I find little difference between my target ammo and that which I carry for SD. I have never had a problem with any round failing to feed, fire or eject.

    I figure I have saved half the amount of money I would have spent on ammo over that past 30 years.

    Yes to reloading for me! It has not only saved me a ton of money but it also has provided some quiet time doing something I enjoy.

    bosco

  10. #9
    Senior Member Array preachertim's Avatar
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    Yes and also remember that even if you don t save alot of money it can be enjoyable. If you are doing it for the money aspect only it becomes work. I do it because i like being able to adjust the bullet to the Gun. Different powders shoot different , primers etc. I reload about a 100 9mm at a time on a single stage press and enjoy it. It serves its purpose in more than one way.
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    Senior Moderator
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    It can be therapeutic for sure.
    I would rather stand against the cannons of the wicked than against the prayers of the righteous.


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  12. #11
    Member Array sasomers's Avatar
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    I have 2 good friends who are very experienced at reloading. The big benefit is that they both have all of the necessities to reload. I'm just getting started, I've de-primed, sized and tumbled my first 250 rounds. Since I had to do it one at a time it lead to about 3 hours of really good conversation with a good friend and mentor.

    I love reloading for many many reasons, cost is only one of them.
    S&W 638 .38 :: Sig P229 :: Ruger MkIII :: VEPR K 5.45x39 AK-74 :: Mosin Nagant M44 :: Hi-Point 995 9mm (shoulder fired pistol)

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    VIP Member Array Tom G's Avatar
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    One thing to keep in mind is to have plenty of ventilation when casting. Lead can be a hazard to your health. I reloaded for 25 years when it was cheap to do so.
    When I started to do it for money it got to be more like work..

  14. #13
    VIP Member Array edr9x23super's Avatar
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    I used to reload 9mm but don't anymore because the problem with 9mm is that it is a tapered case, and therefore the base of the case tends to "bell out" after successive resizes, and will not chamber anymore. trust me, if you are shooting a match, or just practicing at the range, this will end your session and you will be making a trip to the gunsmith to get the jammed round out. So be very careful, if you must reload 9mm definitely get a chamber gauge and check those rounds after you reload them the first time, and discard the cases when they get too far out of spec!
    "Guard with jealous attention the public liberty. Suspect everyone who approaches that jewel. Unfortunately, nothing will preserve it but downright force. Whenever you give up that force, you are inevitably ruined". - Patrick Henry

  15. #14
    Distinguished Member Array JerryM's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by edr9x23super View Post
    I used to reload 9mm but don't anymore because the problem with 9mm is that it is a tapered case, and therefore the base of the case tends to "bell out" after successive resizes, and will not chamber anymore. trust me, if you are shooting a match, or just practicing at the range, this will end your session and you will be making a trip to the gunsmith to get the jammed round out. So be very careful, if you must reload 9mm definitely get a chamber gauge and check those rounds after you reload them the first time, and discard the cases when they get too far out of spec!
    I believe you, but have never had that happen. I always use a Lee Factory Crimp Die, and check several of the rounds in a gage.

    Best,
    Jerry

  16. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by JerryM View Post
    I believe you, but have never had that happen. I always use a Lee Factory Crimp Die, and check several of the rounds in a gage.

    Best,
    Jerry
    Never happened to me either. My Dillon crimps the round at the final station.
    CCW permit holder for Idaho, Utah, Pennsylvania, Maine and New Hampshire. I can carry in your country but not my own.

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