reloading

reloading

This is a discussion on reloading within the Reloading forums, part of the Defensive Ammunition & Ballistics category; anyone know of an easy to understand tutorial on reloading? Do you think I could use a reloading press to the blanks that I use ...

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Thread: reloading

  1. #1
    Senior Member Array BRTCP88's Avatar
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    reloading

    anyone know of an easy to understand tutorial on reloading? Do you think I could use a reloading press to the blanks that I use for Civil War reenacting?
    Ron Paul 2012

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    Senior Member Array rmilchman's Avatar
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    About a month ago I purchased "The ABC's of Reloading". It was a good read, my problem is that I can not get small pistol primers for reloading,

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    Member Array Valkman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rmilchman View Post
    About a month ago I purchased "The ABC's of Reloading". It was a good read, my problem is that I can not get small pistol primers for reloading,
    That's the book you want to read, and maybe a reloading manual or three.

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    Member Array gumaro's Avatar
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    The book mentioned above is a good place to start. What kind of blank cartridges are you trying to make? I thought most of the Civil War firearms were cap and ball revolvers, muzzle loaders, and a few rim fire rifles. I read that for cap and ball revolvers you load same amount or 2/3 of powder normally used depending on caliber, no ball, wad, and cap, but I have never tried it. I remember there was a article in a issue of Shotgun News about making blanks, but I no longer have it, it talked about the die needed to make various blanks (star crimped the case) and powder used to make various rounds with the same die.

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    Senior Member Array BRTCP88's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gumaro View Post
    The book mentioned above is a good place to start. What kind of blank cartridges are you trying to make? I thought most of the Civil War firearms were cap and ball revolvers, muzzle loaders, and a few rim fire rifles. I read that for cap and ball revolvers you load same amount or 2/3 of powder normally used depending on caliber, no ball, wad, and cap, but I have never tried it. I remember there was a article in a issue of Shotgun News about making blanks, but I no longer have it, it talked about the die needed to make various blanks (star crimped the case) and powder used to make various rounds with the same die.
    Just normal paper tubes with powder inside. It's the same thing the actual soldiers used, except that there's no bullet. I don't know that much about reloading, but I thought I might be able to load the paper tube with powder the way you fill the brass cartridge.
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    Senior Member Array boscobeans's Avatar
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    Major problems with your idea.

    1. There are warnings about using any modern powder measuring systems with black powder. It doesn't flow the same way modern smokeless powders do. I would not want to have a hopper full of black powder explode in my face. Smokeless powder burns (could still be a major problem) but black powder will explode.

    2. The paper you use (usually soaked in potassium nitrate) is also extremely sensitive to the slightest spark.

    I would stick to the old fashioned methods of measuring and loading the paper cartridges (blanks).

    bosco

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    Senior Member Array torrejon224's Avatar
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    Go to your local library. Mine has nine books on reloading and most are on the shelf most of the time. The ABC is a good basic book and there are several others. Most of the large manuals that outfits like Speer, Lee and the powder companies are available as PDF versions on line so before you spend $30 or more for a manual do a google search. For instance Hodgon, IMR and Winchester have a fully searchable data base on line for different calibers, powders, etc! I have an old laptop in the shed where I do my reloading and it has just been a great resource.

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    Senior Member Array BRTCP88's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by boscobeans View Post
    Major problems with your idea.

    1. There are warnings about using any modern powder measuring systems with black powder. It doesn't flow the same way modern smokeless powders do. I would not want to have a hopper full of black powder explode in my face. Smokeless powder burns (could still be a major problem) but black powder will explode.

    2. The paper you use (usually soaked in potassium nitrate) is also extremely sensitive to the slightest spark.

    I would stick to the old fashioned methods of measuring and loading the paper cartridges (blanks).

    bosco
    Whoa, thanks for the warning. Why didn't I think of that *facepalm*
    Ron Paul 2012

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    VIP Member Array cvhoss's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BRTCP88 View Post
    Just normal paper tubes with powder inside. It's the same thing the actual soldiers used, except that there's no bullet. I don't know that much about reloading, but I thought I might be able to load the paper tube with powder the way you fill the brass cartridge.
    If expense isn't a problem, Lyman, Hornady, and RCBS all make black powder measures. The main difference between these and smokeless powder measures are that for black powder, there are no steel moving parts (to prevent a spark) and no plastic parts such as the hopper (to prevent a static spark). I have the Lyman BP measure and use it to load BP 45-70 cartridge loads.

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    Senior Member Array sui-juris's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rmilchman View Post
    About a month ago I purchased "The ABC's of Reloading". It was a good read, my problem is that I can not get small pistol primers for reloading,
    I read that book too and highly recommend it.
    " Government is not reason, it is not eloquence, it is force; like fire, a troublesome servant and a fearful master." George Washington

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