My letter to the St Pete Times today

This is a discussion on My letter to the St Pete Times today within the The Second Amendment & Gun Legislation Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; It is just amazing to me that people can make such a big deal about such nonsensical issues. First, there is no big medical database ...

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 16 to 22 of 22
Like Tree4Likes

Thread: My letter to the St Pete Times today

  1. #16
    Senior Member Array DoctorBob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    577
    It is just amazing to me that people can make such a big deal about such nonsensical issues.

    First, there is no big medical database that tracks gun ownership and the situation for creating a database that MIGHT possibly include such information is so far down the 'pike and so unlikely to ever happen, given the organizational structure of medicine, that it has to be sheer paranoia to even think about beginning to consider the possibility of worrying about it.

    Second, do you think it would be Ok to ask about guns with symptoms of ear, shoulder, arm, hand, lead toxicity, and other possible gun related complaints are presented? And, while on that topic, is it OK to take a sexual history if someone presents with genital isues like prostatitis or vaginal discharge? Or an alcohol history if they have liver problems or gynecomastia? Or are we just supposed to read minds and use crystal balls?

    The lobbies you really have to worry about are the big pharma and insurance company lobbies that make their money by either selling you crap that doesn't work at very high prices or denying you care based on their decision to not cover yoru illness. Or certain political parties that want to cut your Medicare benefits.

    Yes, I am an NRA member.

  2. Remove Ads

  3. #17
    Senior Member Array SFury's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    757
    When someone has injuries that are consistent with, or could be aggravated by, gun use then there is no issue. The same holds true for the other symptoms and causes you posed.

    The issue at hand is personal privacy, and an irrelevant question for most purposes. The AMA is asking the question, not necessarily the attending physician. If the results don't get filed, or are not used in their entirety, then why ask them before treating someone?

    A bit of proactive measures to stop something from becoming a larger issue does not hurt. The saying to go with this situation is, "An ounce of prevention prevents a pound of cure."

  4. #18
    Senior Member Array DoctorBob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    577
    Quote Originally Posted by SFury View Post
    When someone has injuries that are consistent with, or could be aggravated by, gun use then there is no issue. The same holds true for the other symptoms and causes you posed.

    The issue at hand is personal privacy, and an irrelevant question for most purposes. The AMA is asking the question, not necessarily the attending physician. If the results don't get filed, or are not used in their entirety, then why ask them before treating someone?

    A bit of proactive measures to stop something from becoming a larger issue does not hurt. The saying to go with this situation is, "An ounce of prevention prevents a pound of cure."
    Because they are SCREENING questions. Just like a mammogram is a screening test and 99% are negative; it is relevant to the person with potential for a problem. We can't tell in advance who is going to have a positive answer to a screening question so they are asked of all.

  5. #19
    Moderator
    Array gasmitty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Gilbert, AZ
    Posts
    10,016
    When my kids' pediatrician asked me if I had guns in the house, it most assuredly had nothing to do with any lead toxicity issue. The "guns in the home are 43 times more likely..." discussion which ensued was sort of a clue.
    Smitty
    NRA Endowment Member

  6. #20
    Senior Member Array SFury's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    757
    I guess if I come in with flu symptoms, then owning a gun has something to do with the cause of my misery? Doubtful. I work for a school district. Simple communicable diseases are commonplace every year. Dense human populations are the root of the problem, and nothing else.

    There are screening questions, and there are specific injury/illness related questions that get asked if there is a need. There is no reason to ask about gun ownership in a questionnaire prior to any treatment. Especially not in the case of children as it was in Florida.

    I was recently rear-ended by some college kid, should I have been asked if I owned guns prior to being treated? Should I have been asked about my sexual history first? I had a sore neck, and issues caused by stiffening muscles. The only relevant fact was being rear ended as I was driving home.

    Some activities lead to some injuries. Fact, and I made that point earlier. Blank questionnaires can be helpful, but some things are not meant to be asked in them. Period.

    I don't trust the AMA, I don't trust most national organizations with their own agenda-driven leadership when they push their ideals into my life. Just so you know, I'm not talking about the American Motorcyclists Association either. Right or wrong, that's the way it has to be. People need to learn to live and let live instead of trying to tell other people how to live.

  7. #21
    VIP Member
    Array OldVet's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    S. Florida, north of the Miami mess, south of the Mouse trap
    Posts
    15,719
    Due to current heath issues, I've had to see several doctors and medical facilities recently for the first time. Not one has asked me directly or on the paperwork anything personal beyond do I smoke or drink alcohol. Not one mention about firearms (or my sex life). AMA or not, this tells me it's purely a doctor's choice to ask about firearms or not.

    Any questions about firearms would go unanswered, unless, of course, perhaps if I was being treated for GSWs. Should a doctor decide he can't treat me because I refuse to answer, there is an abundance of others who would be glad to receive my insurance payments without asking irrelevent questions.
    Retired USAF E-8. Remember: You're being watched!
    Paranoia strikes deep, into your heart it will creep. It starts when you're always afraid... "For What It's Worth" Buffalo Springfield

  8. #22
    Senior Member Array DoctorBob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    577
    You guys are making me crazy about this! Screening questions are asked at regular intervals like the first office visit and maybe once yearly at an annual visit - at that point it's usually, "has anything we asked about changed in the last year." At that point it would be wise to answer, "oh, yeah, there is blood in my stool," or "I get winded going up a flight of stairs and it gives me a pain in my shoulder," or " we are rehabbing an old house and chipping a lot of pain off the wall."

    Or you might be asked, "when was your last mammogram, was it ordered by Dr. X," or Who did your last rectal exam or papsmear, etc."

    If you don't want your primary care physician to ask about any of that stuff, just tell him/her that you will figure out what is wrong, what is relevant and what s/he needs to know and to leave all other topics and screening questions or tests out of it.

    The American Medical Association does not now nor have they specified what screening questions should be asked. Some groups like the Amer. College of Internal Medicine or the Family Practice or Pediatric groups have suggested that some screening questions be asked to guide discussions on safety and disease prevention. It's not a conspiracy.

    An emergency medicine specialist treating you for auto accident trauma will not typically inquire about your guns or your sex life - (unless they were directly related to the accident); an orthopedist is not going to ask about your prostate or mammogram while treating a broken arm (unless one of the medications s/he was intending to prescribe would hve harmful effects in those areas.

    Lighten up people, you are being paranoid.
    Last edited by DoctorBob; August 8th, 2011 at 07:09 AM.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Search tags for this page

saint pete times letters

,

st pete times forum amendments

,

st pete times letter about school

Click on a term to search for related topics.