Virginia glove compartment et al storage

This is a discussion on Virginia glove compartment et al storage within the The Second Amendment & Gun Legislation Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; "...Finally, it is my opinion that an individual may not keep a firearm stored in his vehicle at a place of employment if there is ...

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Thread: Virginia glove compartment et al storage

  1. #16
    VIP Member Array BugDude's Avatar
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    "...Finally, it is my opinion that an individual may not keep a firearm stored in his vehicle at a place of employment if there is a
    company policy or signage prohibiting firearms on the premises."

    If it is a company policy only, you're only breaking company policy and not law. The most they can do is fire you, and if they are searching your car that's probably already a foregone conclusion. If you are concerned about storing your firearm in your car at work in their parking lot, mail yourself an empty envelope or box. Then use it to store your firearm in inside your car. It is a Federal Offense for your employer to look at your personal mail regardless of if it has been opened or not.
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  3. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by peckman28 View Post
    Property rights are the bedrock of freedom. If the owner of the property (and I do mean specifically genuine private property, not anything owned by government in any capacity) insists that you disarm to be on his/her property, that is and should be their right. In a real free society you are just as free not to associate with said person. I only wish here in MD we could split hairs over such comparatively minor things, since having weapons in your vehicle almost anywhere here will land you in major legal trouble...
    Ah, but here is the conflict...the vehicle is my private property. Certainly the private property owner has the right to refuse entry of the person or vehicle onto their property. But what about the contents of the vehicle? Does the property owner have the right to allow entry but dictate terms relating to the contents of the vehicle? Substitute camera, coat, tire iron, or something else for firearm. Now we have the slippery slope.
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  4. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by RayBar View Post
    Vehicle carry without a recognized permit is allowed IF the firearm is in plain view in a snapped holster or if it is concealed under certain specific conditions. These conditions refer to a firearm that is securely encased or is not readily accessible. Not readily accessible means locked in the trunk of a car or the storage compartment of a pick-up truck or rv. Either of these conditions is legal for non-licensed carry. But firearms concealed on the person while occupying the vehicle is illegal. This would include under ones clothing or under the seat. The State also prohibits most businesses from preventing customers or employees from possessing firearms in their locked vehicles while those vehicles are parked on company ground. Floridas preemption law prevents localities from regulating most aspects of firearm ownership. With the exception of certain zoning laws,firearm regulation is uniform throughout the State for permittees and non-permittees. No open carry. From Travelers guide to the firearm laws of the fifty States.
    Actually, FL municipalities have NO say so as to firearm ownership. They only have limited zoning authority as to where firearms may be sold, etc. No municipality may establish any ordinance concerning individual firearm ownership or regulation without risking civil lawsuits. State law rules and does not permit additional regulation.
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  5. #19
    VIP Member Array peckman28's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveH View Post
    This is a very tricky issue, IMHO.

    Figuratively, I want my cake and eat it to.

    I tend to fully agree on that right for property not open to the public, your home, your farm, etc.

    However, when it comes to businesses, I not so sure. When one opens a business that is open to the public one automatically surrender some of those "rights" as a condition of doing business. Just try replacing a gun-buster sign on your store with a sign that says "Whites Only", "No Women Admitted", etc.

    For that matter, in some States even some private clubs are restricted as to membership requirements -- particularly, if they have food service or an ABC license.

    Then you have all the zoning issues, land-use laws, the National Environmental Policy Act, the National Historic Preservation Act, etc.

    Why is a Constitutional right given less weight?
    The central question is, who's risking their capital to open and operate that private business? A private citizen. I think that if someone wants to be a total loser and post "whites only", as long as they are the ones who paid to open that business and they are the legal owner, they should be able to do it. They would probably be bankrupted very quickly by people who don't want him to see a dime, and rightfully so. This does not require government intervention, and in fact is a violation of freedom of association. Same thing with whether or not a private business wants to let you be armed on their property. If you find it outrageous enough, you could lead your friends and like-minded people to boycott them, you could try to talk them out of it, etc. Property rights should apply to businesses just as much as to individuals, since businesses are still owned by individuals. We shouldn't let the fact that it is a piece of property the individual owns to conduct business on muddy the issue. If you own it, you do what you want with it unless you start polluting your neighbor's land or otherwise violate their property. Those who don't like that should not support said business, and allow the market to punish their foolishness, not the government.

  6. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by ctr View Post
    Ah, but here is the conflict...the vehicle is my private property. Certainly the private property owner has the right to refuse entry of the person or vehicle onto their property. But what about the contents of the vehicle? Does the property owner have the right to allow entry but dictate terms relating to the contents of the vehicle? Substitute camera, coat, tire iron, or something else for firearm. Now we have the slippery slope.
    In that case why could you not simply park elsewhere and walk onto their property to conduct business? The vehicle is your property, but if you're parking it on a lot they own then they have every right to say that you can't have a gun in there, or anything else they object to. If you find that disagreeable you shouldn't go there, and you should tell all your friends. If enough people find their restrictions offensive, they will probably change their policy. Ultimately, they may hate guns but they like money more. Yet another instance of undermining property rights is not the answer.

  7. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by peckman28 View Post
    In that case why could you not simply park elsewhere and walk onto their property to conduct business? The vehicle is your property, but if you're parking it on a lot they own then they have every right to say that you can't have a gun in there, or anything else they object to. If you find that disagreeable you shouldn't go there, and you should tell all your friends. If enough people find their restrictions offensive, they will probably change their policy. Ultimately, they may hate guns but they like money more. Yet another instance of undermining property rights is not the answer.
    We can agree to disagree on this on. I fail to see how the owner of the property has had their rights undermined, nor do I think the restrictions on vehicle contents are reasonable.
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  8. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by peckman28 View Post
    In that case why could you not simply park elsewhere and walk onto their property to conduct business? The vehicle is your property, but if you're parking it on a lot they own then they have every right to say that you can't have a gun in there, or anything else they object to. If you find that disagreeable you shouldn't go there.
    This..

  9. #23
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    Can't a Virginia resident OC while driving also?

  10. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by pappou68 View Post
    Can't a Virginia resident OC while driving also?
    Yes, any Virginia resident who can possess a firearm can OC while driving.

    and , yes, the issue we were working on this passed legislative session was primarily for those w/o a CHP.

    However, there was also the issue of one person having a CHP and one not. Say, a CHP holder and spouse w/o a CHP were going somewhere and the CHP holder was driving. Now say, he/she needed to disarm to go in a place that is no guns. Under some anti-gun States Attorneys reading of the old law the passenger would have the exit the car before the driver disarmed.

    BTW, this law also applies to boats. I, for one, am happy that there is no convoluted question as to keeping a hand gun in a "secure container" on my boat.

    --------

    BTW2, there is still an issue of what constitutes "open", also. I hope we tackle that soon.
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