An interesting read about kids playing with guns (UK)

An interesting read about kids playing with guns (UK)

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Thread: An interesting read about kids playing with guns (UK)

  1. #1
    VIP Member Array peacefuljeffrey's Avatar
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    An interesting read about kids playing with guns (UK)

    UK article about someone's kid liking to play with guns

    Guns an' Boys

    Turning a blind eye to the 'shoot outs' while the apple of her eye was in nappies, Josie Barnard found her son's 'inalienable right to bear arms' took on a different hue when nursery became part of the scene..


    Saving the universe


    When I was a shiny new parent and my son was a rosy cheeked baby, almost any toy I gave him made him gurgle with pleasure - rattle, cuddly animal, teddy bearís tea set - and I suppose part of me thought it would always be that way. Heíd like what I'd like him to like.

    Not that I had a clear idea of what I wanted him to play with. But I did know I didnít want guns to feature. Some chance ... As soon as he could get a long piece of stickle brick to stick to a short one he was playing with guns.

    And he was surprisingly specific about the sound they made - not 'bang' or 'pow' but 'pee-ow', again and again, 'pee-ow', 'pee-ow'.

    I did consider banning guns, for about a millisecond. Iíd have had to keep him in an empty room with his hands strapped to his sides. Instead, I took the "turn-a-blind-eye" approach. That didn't work either. There was only so long I could ignore battles raging in my own living room, especially when my son had decided I was the 'baddy'. So we'd go out, maybe to the park strewn with twigs, in my son's hands, 'guns', which he'd aim and fire at passers-by. Some of the looks we got were surprisingly nasty. And he was only brandishing a twig.

    In any case, it was all very well me turning a blind eye, but soon he started nursery. And at nursery, the ban on guns was serious.

    Of course, it didn't mean superhero games didn't happen. The mini-Batmen and Power Rangers just had to go undercover, saving the universe furtively, behind the climbing frame, over in the trees. And avoiding the teachers meant avoiding the computers, the water play area, the drawing tables: all the places the teachers wanted them to go.

    One day I was sitting with my son while he drew a spaceship. A teacher came over, and, oh, she lavished him with praise - until he drew a gun on top. And suddenly he was being given a lecture on why guns were bad. And she was his favourite teacher.

    So at home, he wanted guns? Fine. Play-fights? Every morning. He'd leap off the bed and swing from the clothes rail, tumble-turn across the floor on his way to laser blast the Ďbaddyí escaping up the bookcase. But, then he noticed that stretched out on the floor like that, he was the shape of a '1', and if he curled round and bent his knees, he was a '2', and suddenly he was being numbers, right through from 1 to 10. In fact, he got so excited he ran downstairs and actually started to write them, with a pen.

    At nursery, though, he was still busy avoiding the teachers. It must have been the very quietness of the rooms that set them thinking. Apart from the odd glimpse of trainers running through the bushes, the only sign that my son and his friends were there at all was that the capes from the dressing up rail were gone. So, at school, the ban on guns was lifted.

    Once being a superhero was OK, violent mayhem didnít break out, but instead, saving the universe led the children inside, to the drawing table to make a back-drop, or, to the cutting table to make a mask. The mini- Batmen and Power Rangers were doing all the things the teachers had wanted them to do in the first place.

    And anyway, what a hypocrite I was being. I'd spent half my childhood running round the Yorkshire moors playing cowboys and Indians, cops and robbers, using cap guns and bows and arrows that could give quite a sting. And there I was objecting to my son waving a carrot.

    Of course now that Iíd quite happily give him a whole toybox full of plastic Smith and Westerns, he's grown out of them. If only I could find reasonable grounds on which to object to footballs ...

    Interesting . . . Are they saying that people actually came around, and realized that it's natural and normal for boys to like to play with guns, and that it's not an evil thing?


  2. #2
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    I have to laugh (ironically) - thinking back to when I was amazingly young (early 50's) - and had a very fine silver Colt repro, cap firing gun. Mock Ivory grips too!

    This fine item had six ''cartridges'' - each with pseudo bullet which reached to bottom of brass case. The case had holes in bottom and the idea was, you put two or three caps in the bottom and replaced the long ''bullet''. The assembled round was very realistic. Hammer hit end of a case and 'bang' - very satisfying ....... six times.

    Load six of these into the gun and there was a very authentic looking piece

    I wandered around all my locality with this stuck into my ''Lone Star'' Cowboy rig - shops, anywhere - never a raised an eyebrow LOL.

    Shucks - no way could that happen today in UK - and not even here I'll bet either.

    Ahhhh .......... the mis-spent youth in the good ol days!
    Chris - P95
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    yep, I had many of single action revo toys, as well as lever guns, and battle rifles too.
    "In matters of style, swim with the current; in matters of principle, stand like a rock." Thomas Jefferson


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    VIP Member Array peacefuljeffrey's Avatar
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    The first toys in my life that became my favorites, I think, were my Matchbox cars, followed closely by my toy guns.

    The toy guns ended up being much more powerful favorites than the cars ever were.

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    I remember having a Mattel snub nose 38 with shoulder holster when I was a child. It came with plastic ammo that you put a greenie stickem cap on the back of and when you fired the cap when off.

    I wore it to Sunday School often under my sport jacket. One Sunday, the teacher ticked me off and I drew my snub nose and fired POP, POP, POP at her. Not real safe gun handling but, HEY, I was 6 years old and even then I knew the difference between a real gun and a toy.

    She didn't even stop talking to the class but proceeded to confiscate my gun and continue with the Bible lesson. After Sunday school, she gave it back to me but only after telling my Mom what I did.

    I got a lecture and spanking (yes they did that back then) from Mom for disrupting Sunday school but nothing about the gun. She did make me leave it home after that though.

    Boy, times they are a changin'.

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    ........and had a very fine silver Colt repro, cap firing gun. Mock Ivory grips too!............Load six of these into the gun and there was a very authentic looking piece ...........I wandered around all my locality with this stuck into my ''Lone Star'' Cowboy rig - shops, anywhere - never a raised an eyebrow LOL.

    Ahhhh .......... the mis-spent youth in the good ol days!
    Yep - same rig here..........growing up in Kansas was the same. But, I got busted by the local "Sheriff" (Mom) ( )for trying to knock my sister out with the butt of the gun just like the Lone Ranger though....darn......it didn't work.................


    The tyrant dies and his rule is over, the martyr dies and his rule begins. ― The Journals of Kierkegaard

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    for trying to knock my sister out with the butt of the gun just like the Lone Ranger though
    Richard - that's just plain excessive
    Chris - P95
    NRA Certified Instructor & NRA Life Member.

    "To own a gun and assume that you are armed
    is like owning a piano and assuming that you are a musician!."


    http://www.rkba-2a.com/ - a portal for 2A links, articles and some videos.

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    Distinguished Member Array Colin's Avatar
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    I had pea shooters, spud guns, cap guns and a tommy gun that made a RAT-TAT-TAT sound, it was so cool!

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    I think I was in about the last age group to really get away with playing with toy guns. We had a huge rubbermaid bin the garage with enough rifles and pistols to outfit most of the neighborhood. The favorites were always the most realistic, like the lever actions made out of wood and metal (some of which also had their orange caps removed mysetiously), or the revolvers that used the ring caps, which were much better than the paper ones, while the plastic orange alien blasters were usually the dregs.

    Now if I see a toy gun in a toy store while looking for a couple of my cousins (their parents tried the ban on toy guns, didn't work), they are all neon colored and barely resemble any sort of real gun at all.
    Fortes Fortuna Juvat

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  10. #10
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    I Can Remember BB Guns On Two Ocassions...

    When I was 9 or 10...just like the movie, I got one of them thar' Red Rider Rifles...I was king of the hill...

    I also remember a friend who owned a large glass business and he ran it out of his home. For this small town, he was a pretty big business...so lots of glass everywhere. He and I were friends and his son was in my 5th grade class...Mmmmmm...Glass business, and 5th grader with a new BB Gun...

    Well if you haven't guessed, my friend came home one night to find thousands...yes thousands of dollars of glass shot with BB holes. Car windshields, regular window glass, commercial size windows, etc...

    Needless to say, little Johnny (the names have been changed for protection from child protection agencies)...didn't need a chair in my classroom for a few days.

    My friend said that he would give his kid back the BB gun...when he turned 45!

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    It does raise a good point.

    When the baby boomer were kids, we used toys guns while playing cowboys & indians or cops & robbers or even North vs. South. Even when you were on the losing side, you understood the parallels to right & wrong, as well good vs. evil.

    Today's youth isn't being taught right from wrong, or good vs. evil. Today's children have a distinct lack of morality that isn't being instilled in them by parents or even teachers.

    We've gone from personal responsibility to the 'it's not your fault' victim mentality. As kids we knew that there were consequences for wrong behavior, now...........there are none. No rules will eventually lead to anarchy.

    On your next trip to WallyWorld, watch some of the spoiled rotten brats running around......even when a parent does correct a child (RARE), look at the other adults.......you will see some who are glad the child was disciplined......but a large portion will look like they disapprove of a parent correcting their child.

    Whats going to happen when these little heathens grow up into unruly adults?

    We've certainly entered the twilight zone. We've gone from a time where most boy's had a BB gun with them all the time (I know I did).......to where if someone sees a BB gun they call a SWAT team to respond.

    Man...it is really hard to be optimistic isn't it?
    Quemadmodum gladius neminem occidit, occidentis telum est.-Seneca

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    VIP Member Array raevan's Avatar
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    2 things of note. 1. some of those baby boommers are our antigun riffraff.
    2. Some of those neat cap guns we played with as children are now worth a small fortune as antiques if in good condition.

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    My favorite cap gun was a pistol that had a real working mag, and took caps on a strip. it was supposed to cut off the previous cap and fling it into the air like a discharged round, but it didn't always work that way, but hey, it was a toy. If we had all broken our guns, it was time to break out the sticks, we plaid with sticks a lot.

    My little man loves his toy guns, but his daycare has several teachers that believe "guns are bad" so I try to get him to keep the gun talk at school to a min, We went to the local gunshop to mail off my glock, and he sent streight to the counter, and said, I wan't that one, and that one, Daddy, can we all get the same kind, you get the silver one, and I'll get the brown one, He was refering to the Kimber add on the back of several mags I have, He's a 1911 fan at the age of 3, and pointed them out in the store, among simular styled guns. I guess I can learn to live with that.
    "fundamental principle of American law that a government and its agents are under no general duty to provide public services, such as police protection, to any individual citizen." [Warren v. District of Columbia,(D.C. Ct. of Ap., 1981)]
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