Canadian article on gun show in VA

This is a discussion on Canadian article on gun show in VA within the The Second Amendment & Gun Legislation Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; Note highlighted text near bottom. http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servl...rce_login=true Larry Cadden points to the black Beretta semi-automatic handgun on sale for $375 and explains why somebody might want ...

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    Canadian article on gun show in VA

    Note highlighted text near bottom.

    http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servl...rce_login=true

    Larry Cadden points to the black Beretta semi-automatic handgun on
    sale for $375 and explains why somebody might want to buy it.

    "It's a self-protection gun. It's got a 10-round clip and it shoots
    as fast as you can pull the trigger," he says.

    "That gun has no sporting value at all. It's for killing people.
    That's what self-defence is all about . . . Cain killed Abel with the
    jawbone of an ass. We're a violent society and it's not about to
    change."

    During the week, the bulky Mr. Cadden works as a private
    investigator, but on the weekends he moonlights in sales. Today, in
    his green polo shirt and camouflage hunting cap, he has rented a
    couple of tables at the C & E Dixie Gun and Knife Show and set out a
    dozen firearms, including brand-new rifles still in their shipping
    crates.

    If you have cash or a cheque, a Smith & Wesson .357 revolver or that
    nifty Beretta can be yours, no questions asked.

    Under U.S. federal law, he is not considered a full-time firearms
    dealer so there's no requirement that he conduct a background check
    before selling a handgun to ensure that the buyer doesn't have a
    criminal record or is not subject to a restraining order for domestic
    violence.

    The powerful National Rifle Association (NRA) says Mr. Cadden is
    simply selling guns from his private collection, and, in any case,
    Americans have an unfettered right to bear arms under the Second
    Amendment of the Constitution.

    Two hundred kilometres north of Richmond, the District of Columbia's
    long-time ban on handgun ownership was dealt a serious blow this
    month when an appeals court ruled that the Second Amendment, ratified
    in 1791 to shield state militias, protects an individual's right
    today to keep a handgun at home. The NRA celebrated.

    Gun-control advocates see it differently. They want access to guns
    limited and they consider C & E Dixie and the estimated 4,000 other
    such shows held in the United States each year to be "Tupperware
    parties for criminals."

    "It's a flea-market environment for guns," says John Shanks, director
    of law-enforcement relations at the Brady Center to Prevent Gun
    Violence, a Washington-based lobby group. "Any weekend, in any state,
    you can find a gun show somewhere." The centre was founded by Jim
    Brady, the one-time presidential press secretary who was shot and
    seriously wounded during the assassination attempt on his boss, the
    late president Ronald Reagan, in 1981.

    "The people walking in there buying and selling guns are kind of
    scary," adds Mr. Shanks, a retired police officer. "They are gang
    members, people who look like gang members, organized criminals and
    kids." And if you buy from someone like Mr. Cadden, you can be just
    out of prison, under a restraining order for domestic violence or
    planning to smuggle it into Canada -- and still walk out of the show
    armed to the teeth.

    Because of the loophole allowing private purchases with no strings
    attached, firearms bought at shows often end up north of the border
    -- something that Canada's Criminal Intelligence Service has called
    "a serious threat" to this country's continuing effort to control
    guns.

    In January, two men from Washington State received long prison
    sentences after pleading guilty to smuggling guns, most of them
    bought at shows, into British Columbia in return for marijuana,
    ecstasy and cocaine.

    And just last month, Mark Nelson, a former policeman from Columbus,
    Ohio, was sentenced to 10 years after he and members of his family
    illegally bought more than 500 weapons and then sold them at shows,
    in hotel rooms or out of the trunks of their cars.

    Several of the guns have been traced to violent incidents, including
    a Raven .25-calibre pistol used in a Brooklyn, N.Y., shooting and a
    Ruger 9 handgun discovered on a man charged with crack possession in
    Washington, D.C.

    Another of the guns, a loaded Taurus PT-111 pistol, was found
    strapped to the body of Mohammed Dirie, a Somali-Canadian arrested
    with his friend Yasim Mohamed as they tried to cross the Peace Bridge
    at Buffalo back into Canada in August, 2005. Agents also found a
    second pistol on Mr. Dirie as well as an ammunition clip and bullets.
    His companion was found with a gun under his waistband.

    The two were sentenced to two years in prison for gun smuggling.
    Then, last June, they and 15 others were charged with taking part in
    an alleged Islamic plot to attack public buildings in Toronto and
    import weapons for terrorist purposes.

    Yet Mr. Cadden doesn't believe there is a gun-show loophole. "Any
    sportsman knows where he can sell a gun. I probably know 50 or 75
    people I could sell a gun to by just calling them up on the phone,"
    he says. "I've travelled from Louisiana to New Jersey, and in any of
    those states I could buy a trunk load of guns without going to a gun
    show."

    He's probably right. A spokesman for the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco
    and Firearms (ATF) just laughed when asked how many guns are now in
    private hands, calling it "an impossible figure." But Philip J. Cook,
    an economist and professor of public policy at Duke University,
    estimates the total at about 250 million, with at least one weapon in
    one-third of all U.S. households.

    However, says Prof. Cook, even though the number of guns is steadily
    rising, the firepower is being concentrated as more women become
    heads of households. They are far less likely to bear arms.

    It's impossible to say if there are any criminals or angry former
    husbands trolling the aisles of C & E Dixie, but it's certainly
    crowded with gun lovers. Organizers expect about 5,000 visitors to
    pay $7 a head to attend; admission is free to new NRA members.

    "We do between 60 and 70 shows a year," says organizer Steve Elliott.
    "The first quarter is usually the busiest time. They aren't out
    hunting -- and I guess there's tax refunds as well."

    A little extra money comes in handy for such impulse buys as a
    tear-gas launcher or the Russian-made SKS semi-automatic rifle one
    patron is carrying around with a "For Sale" sign stuck in its barrel.

    The event is being held at The Showplace, a poor man's exhibition
    centre located in a grimy former discount store in suburban Richmond.
    It's the kind of place where people gather on other weekends to swap
    baseball cards or search for bargain antiques.

    But today there are rows and rows of tables -- almost 700 in all,
    rented out at $60 apiece -- stacked with every kind of handgun,
    rifle, holster and ammunition available. There are bayonets, pieces
    of Nazi memorabilia, "gang-banger" semi-automatic machine pistols,
    walk-in gun-storage vaults and tiny, bubble-gum-pink .22 calibre
    rifles for pre-teen girls.

    The parking lot is jammed with pickups sporting "We Support Our
    Troops" bumper stickers. Inside, the crowd is dominated by paunchy
    middle-aged men, but there are also many women and even some families
    with small children.

    At the entrance, the NRA and more extreme groups, such as the
    Virginia Citizens Defense League, which calls the bearing of arms "a
    fundamental human right," are pitching their views and signing up new
    members.

    "We strongly believe that every human being has the right to defend
    themselves," says Leonard Harris, a 34-year-old website developer
    who's manning the Libertarian Party's table.

    Mr. Harris is packing a Kahr P9 semi-automatic handgun, which he is
    wearing on his ample hip. He explains that he doesn't conceal his gun
    because it's too uncomfortable to hide it under his clothes.

    The Libertarians claim theirs is the only party that opposes any
    restrictions on gun ownership, including any form of gun
    registration, waiting periods and taxes. "We know that guns are not
    the cause of America's rising tide of violence," reads a party
    pamphlet. "In fact, they are one of the solutions. We believe that an
    armed society is a polite society."

    Mr. Harris says only the Libertarian Party has enough nerve to turn
    up regularly at gun shows. "Republicans will show up close to
    elections if they're desperate for votes. Democrats, since they're
    anti-gun, don't usually get a good reception here."

    Kim Barton has come to the show with her boyfriend. Despite what
    Prof. Cook says about women and guns, she's in the market for a new
    pistol as well as a leather handbag with a secret compartment in
    which to hide it. The 40-year-old financial analyst has a permit from
    the State of Virginia that allows her to conceal her handgun rather
    than being forced to carry it in the open.

    The long-haired Ms. Barton says she needs to be armed. "I'm not very
    big at all," and carrying a gun "means I can sleep well at night and
    I can move about during the day with a little more security."

    Does she consider Richmond a particularly dangerous city? "Anywhere
    is dangerous . . . It takes 15 seconds for somebody to cross a room
    and kill you and 10 minutes for the police to get there."

    She doesn't accept the idea that it's better to avoid a confrontation
    and simply hand over whatever a robber wants. "What if they want to
    rape me or beat me up? And if they rape me and they're infected with
    something, it's potentially a death sentence."

    She spots a Smith & Wesson revolver and gets the feel of it in her
    hand. "I would use it for home defence but it's a little bit of
    overkill. It's a .44 but a .357 would do the trick." She mulls buying
    a semi-automatic but worries about what would happen if it jammed
    just when she needed it. "I may not have the strength to fix a jam --
    but with a revolver, I just go to the next chamber."

    Even in gun-loving Virginia, Ms. Barton complains, not everybody
    appreciates the value of a firearm, including her employer. "I can't
    take a gun to work. They don't allow it in the building, and it gets
    me very upset. I can't even keep it in my vehicle on company
    property. If I had a car breakdown, I'd like to have one available."

    But for her, owning a gun is more than just a matter of
    self-protection. She loves the social scene, including the people she
    meets at the shooting range. "It's a fun hobby. A lot of very nice
    people are involved in it. And I enjoy learning about these kinds of
    weapons."

    Her boyfriend, an engineer named Joe Ligon, says that he doesn't see
    the point of controls like those adopted by most industrialized
    countries, including Canada, because they offer no guarantee.

    "In the U.K., they banned handguns, and a guy went into a church
    armed with a sword," he explains, referring to a 1999 incident in
    which a naked 26-year-old Londoner burst into a Catholic church and
    slashed 11 worshippers with a samurai sword, injuring four
    critically. A court later ordered him detained indefinitely due to
    insanity.

    Chet Szymecki agrees with Mr. Ligon. The 39-year-old project manager
    from nearby Yorktown, Va., believes in being ready if a gunfight
    should break out at the mall or he is threatened by a bad guy when
    pumping gas. "The only way to stop a crime," he says, "is to meet it
    with equal or greater force."

    Except perhaps when he's in the shower, Mr. Szymecki carries a gun
    everywhere -- although, like all visitors to the Dixie show, he has
    had to have it disabled at the door with the help of two local
    policemen. (One of the cops, Wayne Lloyd, is trying to sell a
    Remington 12-gauge shotgun, which he has displayed alongside the pink
    plastic ties he is using to disable the guns. "I've got the box and
    everything for it in the car." Asking price: $550.)

    "If I'm out mowing the grass, I've got a firearm on my hip," Mr.
    Szymecki says. "If I'm changing the oil on my wife's Suburban, I've
    got a firearm on my hip."

    He is so accustomed to carrying a hidden gun that he avoids driving
    through jurisdictions such as Maryland because it has stricter gun
    laws and doesn't permit concealed weapons.

    Although he grew up in Erie, Pa., not far from the Ontario border,
    "unfortunately, I can no longer visit Canada," he says, arguing that
    the Canadian ban on handguns means he can't protect his wife and
    children north of the border. U.S. visitors can bring rifles if they
    are on a hunting trip but, except for competitions, handguns have
    long been outlawed.

    Gun-lovers such as the NRA contend that there should be no
    restrictions on individual gun ownership because of the
    Constitution's Second Amendment, which was passed shortly after the
    country gained independence and reads:

    "A well-regulated militia being necessary to the security of a free
    state, the right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be
    infringed."

    Gun-control advocates insist that the amendment was passed to protect
    the collective rights of states to maintain armed militias, but the
    NRA believes it guards the gun-owning right of individual Americans,
    an approach the courts have, until now, been reluctant to back. But
    two weeks ago, gun advocates were given a huge boost when an appeals
    court struck down the District of Columbia's ban on handgun
    possession in private homes, citing the Second Amendment.

    The NRA greeted the decision as a major victory, but Washington Mayor
    Adrian Fenty says the ruling has hurt efforts by the District to
    reduce its high rate of gun violence. He vows to do "everything in
    our power to get this decision overturned," and the case is expected
    to go the U.S. Supreme Court, which hasn't ruled on the Second
    Amendment in almost 70 years.

    Mr. Szymecki fully embraces the view that self-protection is the only
    way to safeguard personal security. He likens his gun to the seat
    belt in his car, saying: "The fact is that crime has always been
    around . . . I'd rather have a gun and not need it, than need and not
    have it."

    In the hope of developing a love and respect for guns among his
    children, who are 13, 11 and 9, Mr. Szymecki takes them frequently to
    the shooting range and recently bought an assembly kit for an AR-15,
    the civilian version of the M16 semi-automatic rifle that's standard
    issue for U.S. infantry in Iraq and elsewhere.

    "We assembled it on the dining-room table," he says.

    Justin Krauss is surrounded by piles of ammunition -- projectiles of
    all shapes and sizes imported from Russia, Serbia and Argentina,
    wherever the price is cheapest. For the ecologically minded, there
    are even some lead-free bullets that were made in Canada.

    Every Friday, the 24-year-old Mr. Krauss loads a van at his
    employer's headquarters in Ohio and heads out on the gun-show
    circuit. "I'll do 40 shows a year," he says. "`I like shooting,
    myself, and I like talking to people about what's new."

    Working on commission, he sells anywhere from $10,000 to $200,000
    worth of shells in a weekend. "If we go to a big machine-gun shoot,
    those guys will eat up a lot of ammo. Some guys are shooting 600 to
    800 rounds a minute at 25 cents a round."

    What's his biggest offering? He reaches for a yellow-tipped
    .50-calibre cartridge, a lethal-looking shell the size of a ballpoint
    pen. Patrons looking to put this one to use need only visit the
    nearby display of Rabbit Ridge Enterprises, a licensed gun dealer
    where pride of place is reserved for a Barrett .50-calibre,
    single-shot sniper's rifle. A favourite of U.S. forces in Afghanistan
    and Iraq, the weapon can rip through tank armour or knock down an
    aircraft from a distance of 2,000 yards -- almost two kilometres.

    Owning a Barrett will set you back a cool $3,999. "It's a beautiful
    weapon," a salesman gushes.

    The easy availability of such a powerful firearm frightens
    gun-control advocates such as Tom Diaz of the Violence Policy Center.
    "It's easier to buy a .50-calibre, anti-armour sniper rifle than it
    is to buy a handgun," he says. "Just imagine the potential targets
    that the rifle is capable of defeating, from helicopters to landing
    and taxiing jets and tanks full of toxic chemicals." Some fans use
    the Barrett for long-range target shooting at special ranges. A
    favourite activity: blowing up propane tanks.

    Gun shows came under special scrutiny after the 1999 Columbine High
    School shootings in Colorado when 12 students, a teacher and the two
    shooters were killed, with another 23 people wounded. It turned out
    that the student perpetrators, who were both minors, had acquired
    three of their guns from a private vendor at a gun show with the help
    of an 18-year-old friend.

    On the heels of Columbine, the U.S. Senate passed legislation
    requiring background checks for all sales at gun shows, but that
    measure attracted the ire of the NRA and failed to pass in the House
    of Representatives.

    "You can forget about any meaningful gun control in a Republican
    Congress," says Kristin Rand, legislative co-ordinator at the
    Violence Policy Center. Because shows make buying so easy, she
    contends, licensed dealers are encouraged to ignore the law and
    either keep certain weapons off the books or sell to friends of
    people not allowed to buy. "It's an atmosphere that encourages
    illegal activity."

    In 2004 and 2005, agents from the ATF, along with state and local
    police, descended in large numbers on gun shows in the Richmond area
    after discovering that 400 guns bought at the shows had been involved
    in crimes.

    Tracking sales, the agents found that buyer use of false addresses
    was rampant, but gun aficionados objected to the operation, and a
    congressional hearing was called to examine the exercise of such
    "intimidation."

    Organizer Steve Elliott says he doesn't believe that events like his
    Dixie show are a problem. "We don't draw a big crowd of undesirables.
    Crime guns don't come from gun shows or pawn shops. They come from
    family and friends and other means. It's much easier for a criminal
    to buy a stolen gun than to go here and go through a background
    check," he says, overlooking the fact that such checks aren't
    required when buying from private sellers.

    According to Mr. Elliott, "it's perfectly legal for somebody to
    dispose of his own private property. I've got 150 or so guns, and I'm
    not in the business of buying and selling guns. But when I get ready
    to sell, I'm going to sell them here or somewhere else."

    Given attitudes like that of Mr. Elliiott, gun-control advocates are
    pessimistic than much will change soon. "The NRA has millions of
    dollars and a huge grassroots army of people who will fight the
    slightest tightening of the laws," says Ms. Rand. "Our side can't
    match that
    .


    "The NRA consistently pushes the idea that, if you allow any
    restrictions on guns, the ultimate aim is to confiscate all guns.
    They are completely paranoid."

    As for Mr. Cadden, he has no pangs of conscience about possibly
    placing a lethal weapon in the hands of somebody who may decide to
    shoot up his neighbourhood or slaughter his family.

    "If your daddy kicked you around when you were a kid and you're going
    to buy a gun and kill somebody, that's not my problem."
    ------------------------------------------------------------------
    Do you think Ms. Rand mistakenly gave up a little too much information here? Perhaps, as the gun grabbers say, they don't have the majority of America behind them?????
    "Each worker carried his sword strapped to his side." Nehemiah 4:18

    Guns Save Lives. Paramedics Save Lives. But...
    Paramedics With Guns Scare People!

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  3. #2
    VIP Member
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    Barrett .50-calibre, single-shot sniper's rifle. A favourite of U.S. forces in Afghanistan and Iraq, the weapon can rip through tank armour
    That's funny right there.... if it wasn't by the volume of idiots that repeat the lie.
    You have to make the shot when fire is smoking, people are screaming, dogs are barking, kids are crying and sirens are coming.
    Randy Cain.

    Ego will kill you. Leave it at home.
    Signed: Me!

  4. #3
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    My letter to the paper:
    I just read Alan Freeman's article/editorial and I want to correct some information.
    The article gives the strong hint that Gun Shows are the primary source of weapons for criminals, not so. According to a new study by the FBI, more than 80% of the weapons criminals use come from robberies or other illegal means. Also an study made about Attacks on Police Officers by Criminals it was discovered that in 800 cases studied not one single weapon used came from a gun show.
    (“Violent Encounters: A Study of Felonious Assaults on Our Nation’s Law Enforcement Officers.” )
    Also, it is contradictory that Mr. Freeman's sugests gun shows are the main source of guns for the criminals in one parragraph but then mention that police officers are present at the show. I don't know how is it in Canada, but down here criminals shy away from police and armed law-abading citizens.

    There are several other points I could make, but I will make just one more if you let me and I quote from the article:
    "Barrett .50-calibre, single-shot sniper's rifle. A favourite of U.S. forces in Afghanistan and Iraq, the weapon can rip through tank armour"

    First, ir is not the weapon but the ammunition that produces the damage. Second, the .50 caliber ceased to be an effective anti-tank round somewhere around 1917-1918. If Mr. Freeman had take a bit of time to ask somebody with actual knowledge in firearms or not to base his article on data provided by people with a political axe to grind, he could have been more accurate. Instead he turned out another hit piece against legal gun owners to which we are pretty much inmunized after decades of the same song.
    You have to make the shot when fire is smoking, people are screaming, dogs are barking, kids are crying and sirens are coming.
    Randy Cain.

    Ego will kill you. Leave it at home.
    Signed: Me!

  5. #4
    Distinguished Member Array 4my son's Avatar
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    Nice letter Miggy,

    When will they ever do an article on how these "hotbeds" for guns, for some reason don't suffer the same crime rates as those areas that try to prevent anyone from possesing guns.

    One would think that with this concentration of criminal's and criminal activity, the crime rates would be higher.

    One would think.
    "fundamental principle of American law that a government and its agents are under no general duty to provide public services, such as police protection, to any individual citizen." [Warren v. District of Columbia,(D.C. Ct. of Ap., 1981)]
    If I have to explain it, you wouldn't understand

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    I thought all of the fat jokes were kinda funny. I'd be angry, but it's mostly true (at gun shows anyway).

    All in all, for obviously being a biased piece of work, it could have been a lot worse. Then again, I don't feel fear at the term assault weapon.
    ...He suggested that "every American citizen" should own a rifle and train with it on firing ranges "at every courthouse." -Chesty Puller

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    Member Array Bryan's Avatar
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    What BS, so called fair and balance my A##. What a completely emotion driven argument. So a criminal that can but a hot gun off the street for $100 is going to go into a gun show and buy it for $399?????!?

    Yea criminals have drug money but they are pretty thrifty too. As for terrorist they can make good weapons from readily available items from the grocery store. The only thing we can do is stop them when they reveal themselves.
    -Diplomacy: The art of saying nice dogie until you can find a rock.
    -The truth is a three edged sword.
    -Your brain is your primary weapon everything else is just a tool.
    -When the only tool you have is a hammer then everything starts to look like a nail.

  8. #7
    VIP Member Array SammyIamToday's Avatar
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    I really don't understand why people make such a big deal over where criminals get their weapons. It's painfully obvious that they are going to get them regardless. It seems like the best idea would be to target the criminals themselves and not inadvertant suppliers.
    ...He suggested that "every American citizen" should own a rifle and train with it on firing ranges "at every courthouse." -Chesty Puller

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    Senior Member Array Free American's Avatar
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    Glad to see the anti's are starting to realize they "can't match that" hopefully the typical defeatist attitude expressed by liberals will drive them to quit the gun control fight too.
    They who give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety. Benjamin Franklin


    Previously known as "cjm5874"

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    Quote Originally Posted by SammyIamToday View Post
    I really don't understand why people make such a big deal over where criminals get their weapons. It's painfully obvious that they are going to get them regardless. It seems like the best idea would be to target the criminals themselves and not inadvertant suppliers.
    Now there you go making sense again.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SammyIamToday View Post
    I really don't understand why people make such a big deal over where criminals get their weapons. It's painfully obvious that they are going to get them regardless. It seems like the best idea would be to target the criminals themselves and not inadvertant suppliers.

    +1

    Penalize the actual crime, not the tool. If a murder is committed, it doesn't really matter how it was done.
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    Distinguished Member Array Colin's Avatar
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    A lot of Canadian gun nuts responded to this as well, truely a crap article written by a person with an axe to grind and a brain in neutral.

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    [QUOTE
    Mr. Harris is packing a Kahr P9 semi-automatic handgun, which he is
    wearing on his ample hip. He explains that he doesn't conceal his gun
    because it's too uncomfortable to hide it under his clothes.

    [/QUOTE]






    that was enough to tell me the author didn't know what the hell they were writing about.

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    Another example of moron who don't know what they hell they are talking about, ie: Canadians, writing articles on the very subject that they know nothing about!

    This fool needs to shut the heck up and stand in line for the next 6 years for some minor medical procedure that I can go to my Doctors office and have done today if I want.

    Canada is a haven for liberals and hippies. It's a wonder the whole country doesn't smell like an armpit and unwashed hippy hair. Ewwww.
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  15. #14
    Distinguished Member Array Colin's Avatar
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    "cough" Brady, Jane Fonda, etc "cough"
    Well your country has it fair share of anti-gun nutbars as well.....

    We are doing our best to counter these idiots, but sometimes it's like stepping on cockroaches, the squishing sound brings out more of them. Sometimes they respond in their e-mails to us like a cockroach caught in the light. Not used to have their opinions questioned and their noses rubbed into facts.

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