Govt., securing their future -- long article

This is a discussion on Govt., securing their future -- long article within the The Second Amendment & Gun Legislation Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; I see this as a way for the Government making sure the future applicants of CCW are denied, due to "disqualification" Boston Massachusetts Globe article. ...

Results 1 to 14 of 14

Thread: Govt., securing their future -- long article

  1. #1
    Ex Member Array ibez's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    255

    Lightbulb Govt., securing their future -- long article

    I see this as a way for the Government making sure the future applicants of CCW are denied, due to "disqualification"

    Boston Massachusetts Globe article.

    http://www.boston.com/news/local/art..._begin/?page=1

    Mental screening for young to begin
    Mass. doctors to offer questionnaires for children on Medicaid
    By Carey Goldberg
    Globe Staff / December 27, 2007

    As of Monday, annual checkups for the nearly half a million Massachusetts children on Medicaid will carry a new requirement: Doctors must offer simple questionnaires to detect warning signs of possible mental health problems, from autism in toddlers to depression in teens.

    The checklists vary by age but ask questions about children's behavior - whether they are spending more time alone, seeming to have less fun, having trouble sleeping - that are designed to trigger discussion between parents and doctors. The conversations may or may not lead to a referral to a specialist.

    Over the last several years, such questionnaires have increasingly become the standard of care in pediatric practices, but - spurred by legal action - Massachusetts is jumping ahead of other states by requiring the screens for all its young Medicaid recipients.

    The new requirement represents "a huge step forward in a direction that is a national trend," said Dr. Robin Adair, a University of Massachusetts Medical School pediatrician and screening specialist.

    Supporters say the screening can catch issues earlier, before they develop into hard-to-manage crises.

    Skeptics warn that more children could end up on heavy-duty medications that they don't really need.

    "In a more perfect world, screening for mental illness amongst children would clearly be a good idea," said Dr. John Abramson, a clinical instructor at Harvard Medical School and author of "Overdosed America."

    "But let's look at the realities of the world we live in," he said. "What happens is that there's a very quick translation of mental health symptoms into drug treatment."

    Others wonder how Massachusetts' overburdened mental health system for children will handle the new patients the screening is expected to identify.

    Already, children's psychiatrists and psychologists are often overbooked. Children with serious mental illness sometimes end up stuck in psychiatric hospitals for lack of mental health services in the community.

    If, as expected, the new screening requirement turns up more children with mental health problems, "I do think it creates a potential additional access problem," said Dr. David DeMaso, chief of psychiatry at Children's Hospital Boston.

    The new screening requirement stems from a lawsuit, Rosie D. v. Romney, that accused the state of falling down on its obligations to poor, mentally ill children. The federal judge in the case ruled in January 2006 that Massachusetts must improve its care, and the new requirement is the first step in the state's court-ordered remedy plan.

    Families may decline the screening if they wish. If a screen turns up signs of potential trouble, it is also up to the family whether to pursue further help and an official diagnosis.

    The new requirement applies to the 460,000 children and young adults covered by MassHealth, the state Medicaid program, at annual checkups from birth to age 21.

    The state's private insurers generally already reimburse children's doctors for such written screens, and Medicaid will now pay $9.73 to cover the testing.

    The majority of pediatricians still rely on conversational questions such as "How are you doing in school?" or "Does your child have friends?" But research shows that written questionnaires are more accurate at picking up potential problems.

    The tests can also home in on children whose problems might otherwise be missed. According to national estimates, about 10 percent of children have some sort of significant psycho-social problem, from hyperactivity to anxiety to stress from living amid domestic violence.

    "The earlier we intervene, the more impact we can have on brain development," DeMaso said.

    The screening is not meant to produce a diagnosis, but rather to act as a "check engine light," calling attention to a potential problem, said Lisa Lambert, executive director of the Parent/Professional Advocacy League, which represents families with mentally ill children.

    "If it lights up, you need to call your mechanic, find out what the problem is and if it needs to be repaired," she said.

    One of the league's family support specialists, Kathy Hamelin of Fitchburg, said her own experience as the mother of an autistic son has convinced her that expanded early screening is one of the best things to come out of the Rosie D. case.

    When her now 17-year-old son, Kevin, was a toddler, she said, he would scream and cry all the time, smash his head against the wall when frustrated, and flap his hands bizarrely. When she asked her pediatrician about the hand-flapping, he said, "That's nothing. That's just an excitement reflex and he'll outgrow it." In fact, she said, it is a classic autism trait. Kevin's diagnosis and treatment came only years later.

    If the pediatrician had used an autism screening tool, it might have sounded an early alarm.

    "Our family suffered tremendously because of this," she said, "and I just feel like if he had had early diagnosis, not only the pain and frustration we felt as overwhelmed parents would have been less, but we would have received early intervention," which "would have put him in a much better position than he is now."

    As the routine screening gets underway, the state will be tracking how many children are tested and how many screens indicate a need for follow-up, said Emily Sherwood, who is overseeing the state's remedy for the Rosie D. case as director of its Children's Behavioral Health Interagency Initiatives. The state also plans to expand mental health services for children and make them more family friendly.

    She said parents and clinicians may decide on a variety of responses to worrisome scores: to wait and watch a while. To handle the problems themselves. Or to seek a referral to a mental health specialist.

    The screenings in doctors' offices "help us understand mental health as a part of health," she said. "It's really up to parents and primary care clinicians how they want to use this tool."

    Medicaid law already requires that children be screened annually for various problems, such as hearing and vision loss, as well as for mental illness. This new requirement specifies the method of screening for mental health problems, asking clinicians to choose from among eight standard tools for the screening. Each screen is geared toward a target age; some look for specific problems, such as substance abuse and autism.

    Research suggests that the screens will boost the number of children referred to mental health providers - but not overwhelmingly.

    Dr. Karen Hacker, executive director of the Institute for Community Health at Cambridge Health Alliance, has used and researched mental health screening for four years, and has found that between 5 percent and 7 percent of children score high enough to cause concern. Other practices have found rates as high as 12 percent.

    But, she pointed out, many of those children were already in counseling. Some families decided not to pursue further help, and of those who did, many did not show up at appointments. She has not seen a dramatic uptick in the use of psychiatric medications since the screens were added to routine care, she said, though she understands that is a cause for concern.

    "We're going to have to see how this unfolds," she said.

    Carey Goldberg can be reached at goldberg@globe.com.
    the government uses medical professions to do their dirty work .

    .

  2. Remove Ads

  3. #2
    VIP Member Array SIGguy229's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Kommie-fornia-stan
    Posts
    7,073
    OMG.....no way.....glad I don't live there. I wonder what happens to the information??....and can it be expunged? Otherwise, it also looks like another way to get kids hooked on pharmacuticals.
    Magazine <> clip - know the difference

    martyr is a fancy name for crappy fighter
    You have never lived until you have almost died. For those that have fought for it, life has a special flavor the protected will never know

  4. #3
    Ex Member Array ibez's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    255
    I dont think they expunge anything in Massachusetts

    this record will follow those persons for life I think

    .

  5. #4
    Distinguished Member Array P7fanatic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Texan in NWFlorida
    Posts
    1,588

    Cool

    Massachussetts seems to be getting more pukt up every day.


    "The price of freedom is eternal vigilance." -Thomas Jefferson

    "Liberalism is a Mental Disorder." -Michael Savage

    GOOD Gun Control is being able to hit your target! -Myself

  6. #5
    VIP Member Array Janq's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    6,781
    Quote Originally Posted by ibez View Post
    I dont think they expunge anything in Massachusetts

    this record will follow those persons for life I think.
    True (1) and as things are going here I'd bet on it (2).

    - Janq
    "Killers who are not deterred by laws against murder are not going to be deterred by laws against guns. " - Robert A. Levy

    "A license to carry a concealed weapon does not make you a free-lance policeman." - Florida Div. of Licensing

  7. #6
    Distinguished Member Array bandit383's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Oklahoma
    Posts
    1,681
    Hummm...what is the priority...get help for children that may need it or worry about whether they will lose their 2A rights??? The "I think it will follow them" is not the same as it will follow them.

    We condemn random acts of destruction and death by youth...that is rising exponentially...but when attempts to identify 'mentally at risk' children...people go into the bunker mode. I'm keeping an open mind and truly hope at risk children can be identified early so they can get help.

    Rick

  8. #7
    VIP Member Array SIGguy229's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Kommie-fornia-stan
    Posts
    7,073
    Quote Originally Posted by bandit383 View Post
    Hummm...what is the priority...get help for children that may need it or worry about whether they will lose their 2A rights??? The "I think it will follow them" is not the same as it will follow them.

    We condemn random acts of destruction and death by youth...that is rising exponentially...but when attempts to identify 'mentally at risk' children...people go into the bunker mode. I'm keeping an open mind and truly hope at risk children can be identified early so they can get help.

    Rick
    Unfortunately, the way laws are being written, they are finding more and more ways to take away rights. Since we are the only community being impacted, yeah, I pay attention.

    Taking care of the children is NOT the responsibility of the State--but of the parents.

    Apparently you can still be mentally ill and have 1st, 3rd, 4th, 5th, and 6th Amendment rights...but not the Second. Why is that? Mentally ill or not, bad people do bad things--and there are already laws on the books designed for preventing mentally ill people from getting firearms. Unfortunately, the system relies on people doing their job (a la VA Tech shooter) and in VA that system failed terribly.

    But that's ok...because any new laws will only affect gunowners...
    Magazine <> clip - know the difference

    martyr is a fancy name for crappy fighter
    You have never lived until you have almost died. For those that have fought for it, life has a special flavor the protected will never know

  9. #8
    VIP Member Array Redneck Repairs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    5,134
    Hummm...what is the priority...get help for children that may need it or worry about whether they will lose their 2A rights??? The "I think it will follow them" is not the same as it will follow them.
    IMHO its not about " help the children " . It is about the fact you cannot rule a free man the sooner we can get someone institutionalized either via criminal or medical means the sooner we ( the .gov ) can exert control over that individual . It is at the point that all i need to hear to know an idea is bad is any form of " its for the children " . Most at risk children need PARENTING not drugs or medical intervention . You wont fix what is wrong with our children by ceding control to either the government or the medical profession. Its a bad precident , that will only increase the power of the " Nanny State" .
    Make sure you get full value out of today , Do something worthwhile, because what you do today will cost you one day off the rest of your life .
    We only begin to understand folks after we stop and think .

    Criminals are looking for victims, not opponents.

  10. #9
    Distinguished Member Array bandit383's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Oklahoma
    Posts
    1,681
    Quote Originally Posted by SIGguy229 View Post
    Taking care of the children is NOT the responsibility of the State--but of the parents.
    I'm pretty sure I didn't say or the article says that testing makes the children the "responsibility of the state"...just as testing for downsyndrome (sp) doesn't. I also believe that my parental responsibilities would be compromised if I did not test, especially if I suspected some problems developing...just as in children's cancers.

    Sorry, I fall on the side of the fence that catching mental and physical developmental problems early is a good thing and trumps concerns about 2A. Will it make a difference...only time will tell. But as our country continues to grow, so do social problems, manifested in part by mental health issues. It is in my category of seeing through the forest inspite of the trees...

    Rick

  11. #10
    VIP Member Array friesepferd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    east TN
    Posts
    2,341
    oh boy. and it begins

  12. #11
    Restricted Member Array SelfDefense's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Tucson
    Posts
    2,736
    When you use a welfare program (Medicaid) then you need to follow the rules and not complain. Don't like the rules? Don't use the welfare program.

    The fact is that many people who use Medicaid are mentally ill and their children are also slow. Some of the parents may not even recognize ther child's problems. This testing may allow for earlier detection and possible cure or medical control of children that need help.

    Tying this to 2A is a bit of a stretch...

  13. #12
    VIP Member Array obxned's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    OBX, NC
    Posts
    2,655
    It's a government program that will help you and your chidren.

    Be afraid, be VERY afraid!
    "If we loose Freedom here, there's no place to escape to. This is the Last Place on Earth!" Ronald Reagan

  14. #13
    Ex Member Array ibez's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    255
    Quote Originally Posted by SelfDefense View Post
    When you use a welfare program (Medicaid) then you need to follow the rules and not complain. Don't like the rules? Don't use the welfare program.

    The fact is that many people who use Medicaid are mentally ill and their children are also slow. Some of the parents may not even recognize ther child's problems. This testing may allow for earlier detection and possible cure or medical control of children that need help.

    Tying this to 2A is a bit of a stretch...
    Millions of military personnel get on some sort of Govt. assistance after their tour of duty

    guess its OK for the Govt. to strip them of their 2nd Amendment rights, they should "not complain" right ?


    .

  15. #14
    BAC
    BAC is offline
    VIP Member Array BAC's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Tampa, FL
    Posts
    2,292
    Quote Originally Posted by SelfDefense View Post
    Tying this to 2A is a bit of a stretch...
    I'm inclined to agree.

    Further, and to me the most confusing part of the article, is that it states compliance is completely voluntary. Parents can decline the screening, and if they don't decline the screening can elect to handle treatment on their own. I don't quite understand the purpose of this.

    On a negative note, if this does result to increased perscription drug uses and general medical costs, guess who's footing the bill...

    I see this as an issue, yes, but a 2A issue? Eh...


    -B

Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Similar Threads

  1. Securing/Concealing Long Guns in Vehicle...
    By agentmel in forum Defensive Rifles & Shotgun Discussion
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: May 15th, 2009, 09:35 PM
  2. Guns At The Workplace Long Article But Worth It
    By HKinNY in forum Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: September 23rd, 2008, 11:54 PM
  3. MSN/Marie Claire Pro-Gun Article (Long)
    By srfl in forum Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: May 3rd, 2007, 12:19 AM
  4. ...Rally Around S.C. Teen Who Killed Grandparents...(long article)
    By RETSUPT99 in forum Off Topic & Humor Discussion
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: April 9th, 2007, 12:01 AM
  5. Interesting article about the future of computing
    By XD9 in forum Off Topic & Humor Discussion
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: January 13th, 2006, 04:59 PM