Historical Analysis of Rights and Politics, and Grand Hypocrisy from the NAACP

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    Member Array Jeff S.'s Avatar
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    Historical Analysis of Rights and Politics, and Grand Hypocrisy from the NAACP

    Historical Analysis of Rights and Politics, and Grand Hypocrisy from the NAACP.



    Many a gun owner will declare that his sovereignty is strengthened by his very ability to keep and bear arms. Freedom certainly is not derived from the muzzle of a gun; nevertheless, armed individuals are the Constitutes of an armed populace, which is the last and ultimate safeguard against tyranny at large. History is abundant with examples that tyranny most easily stems from the disarmament of the people. The example closest to the heart of Americans was the American insurrectionists who fought the British and won their independence. Part of their newly won independence was canonized in the enumeration of the right of the people to keep and bear, which further ensured a general militia in order to secure a free State.

    Alas, the descendants of our Forefathers would themselves use the techniques of disarmament to enslave a people. The Civil War no more freed the Negro than the Space Age made every person a rocket scientist. Color people, though legally free according to Federal guidelines, were still considered subordinate by Southern State laws. Predictably, these famous “Black Codes” included that no color person be armed (depriving him of property rights and the ability to defend himself).

    When the Constitution was ratified, the anti-Federalists insisted on a Bill of Rights. This Bill of Rights was a safeguard against Federal encroachment on liberty. It was doubted whether any one of the three branches of Federal government would indeed remain limited. There were even doubts that a Federal Supreme Court would uphold the Constitution or the Bill of Rights. There was much less commentary by the anti-Federalists on the whether local State government would impose the threat to liberty that the Federal government imposed. Some early commentators wrongly viewed that “[the Bill of Rights] command [was to] bind state governments, contra the orthodox public understanding of those who drafted and ratified the Bill of Rights- orthodox honored in John Marshall’s canonical 1833 opinion in Barron v. Baltimore. (1)”

    In Barron v. Baltimore, it was held that the Bill of Rights did not include the 'No State shall…' language, and therefore it did not bar State action. If it were meant to act as a barrier against State action, then the drafters of the Bill of Rights would have used similar language used elsewhere in the Constitution to bar State action, according to the Supreme Court. Needless to say, acts by Congress in the aftermath of the Civil War to free negroes was kept in check by the Supreme Court decision on Barron v. Baltimore. Enter the Fourteenth Amendment.

    The drafters of the Fourteenth Amendment respected the Constitution, and therefore wished to use Constitutional mechanisms to over-ride Barron v. Baltimore. They amended the Constitution to broaden the scope of the Bill of Right. John Brigham, the chief creator of the Fourteenth Amendment, had these concerns in mind:

    [John Brigham’s] February 28 speech mentions the Bill of Rights a dozen times… He ask[ed] why his opponents are
    Quote Originally Posted by Brigham
    "Opposed to enforcement of the bill of rights, as proposed?"
    and quotes Barron v. Baltimore to answer claims that the Federal Bill of Rights already is enforceable against the States. Brigham ask[ed],
    Quote Originally Posted by Brigham
    "Is the bill of rights to stand in our Constitution hereafter, as in the past five years within eleven States, a mere dead letter?"
    and describes the proposed amendment as
    Quote Originally Posted by Brigham
    secur[ing] the enforcement of these provisions of the bill of rights in every State....
    He sums up the issue as:
    Quote Originally Posted by Brigham
    "[W]hether you will give by this amendment to the people of the United States the power, by legislative enactment, to punish officials of the States for violation of the oaths enjoined upon them by the Constitution? That is the question and the whole question."(2)
    The Fourteenth Amendment states, in part, “No State shall make or enforce any law which shall abridge the privileges or immunities of citizens of the United States.” A quick note about the meaning of ‘privileges or immunities.’ There is no question that this phrase was synonymous to ‘rights or liberties,’ and in fact dictionaries from the time period used both terms as synonyms for liberty. (3)” (Ex. “In reaction, the Fourteenth Amendment reflected the broad common usage of “privileges or immunities,” including the pre-existent natural rights of the sort identified in Corfield and the personal rights guaranteed by the Bill of Rights. (4)”

    In short, the Fourteenth Amendment passed with the intent and public understanding that the Bill of Rights (as well as all natural rights) were now a barrier against both Federal and State action.

    Enter the Slaughter-House Cases. Agreed by nearly all scholars left, right, or center, it is clear that not only was the Fourteenth Amendment, in part, meant to make the Bill of Rights applicable against the States, but also that it was the privileges or immunities section of the Fourteenth Amendment quoted above that did so. To reiterate, this was the clear intention of the drafters, as well as the public understanding. In 1873, the Supreme Court would rule on what would come to be known as one of the worst ruling by the Court: The Slaughter-House Cases. In essence, the Slaughter House Cases castrated the purpose and meaning of the Fourteenth Amendment. “The Privileges or Immunities Clause was all but erased from the Constitution in The Slaughter-House Cases, 83 U.S. (16 Wall.) 36 (1873). Slaughter-House refused to consider the clause’s original public meaning or its framers’ well-known intent. Instead, the Slaughter-House majority identified substitute language in place of Article IV’s actual text, and utilized this new constitutional language to justify the imposition of its own policies upon the Fourteenth Amendment’s contrary command. (4)” The Slaughter-House Cases is widely seen as a tragic setback of civil rights and liberties. In the coming decades, the Supreme Court would a fanciful, complex legal dogma of selective corporation as a way to apply fractions of enumerated liberty against the States.

    Recently, the Supreme Court ruled in Heller that the Second Amendment refers to an individual’s right to keep and bear arms, and that this right includes the notion of armed self-defense. Furthermore, they ruled that this right pre-exists the Second Amendment, and that it is fundamental to ordered liberty. The result of the Heller decision was a blossoming of legal guess-work about whether the Second Amendment would become incorporated (be applied against the States). The selective incorporation of the Second Amendment, if it is indeed incorporated, will come from the Fourteenth Amendment, but not from the appropriate 'No State shall… abridge the privileges or immunities' section, but from the due process section. In any case, the City of Chicago and its surrounding suburbs were recently sued because of a ban on handguns and had other regulations (similar to regulations found unconstitutional in Heller). Note that Heller sued D.C., and therefore the case is currently only applicable to the Federal government. The new case, McDonald v. Chicago, is seeking incorporation of the Second Amendment. The lawyer, Alan Gura (the same attorney in the Heller case) is doing something rather extraordinary. He claims in his brief that the Supreme Court need not over-ride precedent of the due process clause to incorporate, but he is also arguing in his brief that it is an appropriate time to hold the Second Amendment (and the entire Bill of Rights) applicable to States by using the section of the Fourteenth Amendment that was intended to do just that: the 'No State shall… abridge privileges or immunities' section. In essence, it is time to over-rule the Slaughter-House Cases. The historical parallel here is beautiful. A meaningful Second Amendment as pertaining to the States was a very large reason for the creation of the Fourteenth, so there is no better case to finally over-rule the Slaughter-House Cases than a case dealing with the Second Amendment.

    As expected, the NAACP swoops in with a brief of their own. They filed their brief in support of neither party, meaning they are not arguing in favor of one side or the other. Instead, they are arguing their own brand of legal reasoning. The mission statement found on NAACP’s website states,
    Quote Originally Posted by NAACP's Mission Statement
    “The mission of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People is to ensure the political, educational, social, and economic equality of rights of all persons and to eliminate racial hatred and racial discrimination. (5)”
    This coincides with the Fourteenth Amendment perfectly. Therefore, it would seem reasonable, even demandable that the NAACP cherish the possibility of the Fourteenth Amendment finally being read as it was intended, which would in turn make their proclaimed mission statement more a reality. Instead, they argue… Well, why put words in their mouth? Allow them to speak for themselves:

    Petitioners [Alan Gura] urge the Court to consider incorporation of the Second Amendment primarily under the Privileges or Immunities Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment. See Pet’rs’ Br. at 9-65. But history, prudence, and principles of judicial restraint counsel that, before embarking on an exploration of this uncharted constitutional terrain, the Court should first look to its well-established framework under the Due Process Clause for determining whether a provision of the Bill of Rights applies to state and local governmental action. There is a danger that a shift to the Privileges or Immunities Clause as the primary source of incorporated rights could result in a rollback of constitutionally protected freedoms—both in terms of the range of individuals covered by the Fourteenth Amendment, and the scope of rights that the Amendment protects. Thus, this Court should not begin its analysis with a reexamination of long dormant constitutional text, the meaning and scope of which is unclear. (6)”

    Does this hold any water? Would the revival of the Fourteenth Amendment pose a danger to civil rights? To be fair, the NAACP is arguing that the precedence of the due process clause be preserved. But if the privileges or immunities clause is properly read by the Court, then civil rights will only be strengthened and broadened. Examine what the Reconstruction opposition to the enumeration of the Fourteenth Amendment stated during ratification debate: “The Fourteenth Amendment’s opponents shared this broad view of the Privileges or Immunities Clause. Representative Rogers stated,
    Quote Originally Posted by Rogers
    ‘What are privileges and immunities? Why, sir, all the rights we have under the laws of the country are embraced under the definition of privileges and immunities. The right to vote is a privilege. The right to marry is a privilege. The right to contract is a privilege. The right to be a juror is a privilege. The right to be a judge or President of the United States is a privilege. I hold if that [the Fourteenth Amendment] ever becomes a part of the fundamental law of the land it will prevent any State from refusing to allow anything to anybody embraced under this term of privileges and immunities." (7)

    In conclusion, it is an exciting time for American citizens. An all too long disingenuous Supreme Court decision that minimized the intended role of the Fourteenth Amendment may very well be overturned, as it should be. If the privileges and immunities clause is given its proper meaning, then the long standing and awkward dogma of selective incorporation will be superseded by the fact that all rights (and not selected ones) are inalienable. The NAACP wishes to reap the benefits of a properly read Fourteenth Amendment without conceding the right of people (whether colored or not) to bear arms. This despite the fact that the right to arms was a significant factor in the creation of the Fourteenth Amendment as the right to arms was (and still is) essential to the freedom of colored people. Former slave owners knew that the disarmament of newly freed slaves would kept them subservient, and one can only guess at the motivation of the NAACP.



    (1)Heller, HLR, and Holistic Legal Reasoning pg 174, By Akhil Reed Amar
    (2)Original Popular Understanding of the 14th Amendment As Reflected in the Print Media of 1866-68 pg 15, By David T. Hardy
    (3)(4)(7) See Petitioners' Brief in McDonald v. Chicago, Supreme Court of the United States. Counsel of Record: Alan Gura. Pg 6, 7, 25; also see pg 15.
    (5) http://www.naacp.org/about/mission/index.htm (11-25-09)
    (6) Brief of Amicus Curise NAACP Legal Defense & Educational Fund, Inc. In Support of Neither Party, in McDonald v. Chicago, Supreme Court of the United States

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    VIP Member Array hogdaddy's Avatar
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    PLEASE LEAVE THEM THERE (5) LETTERS ALONE IT'S THANKSGIVING & Have
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    Member Array sleepyhead's Avatar
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    Thanks! Very interesting read. Are you the author? If not, do you have a link?

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    Distinguished Member Array tiwee's Avatar
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    NAACP of all organizations should have been screaming about gun restrictions. Gun restrictions have been put in place repeatedly when blacks have pushed civil rights. The cost to the rest of us was the loss of our rights right along with the rights of blacks. Good lesson. Support loss of others rights and lose your rights also.

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    VIP Member Array paramedic70002's Avatar
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    They probably think it was black rabble rousers who defended themselves against whites in the Civil Rights era and now it's evil guns that are keeping black communities down. Classic case of can't see the forest for the trees.
    "Each worker carried his sword strapped to his side." Nehemiah 4:18

    Guns Save Lives. Paramedics Save Lives. But...
    Paramedics With Guns Scare People!

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    Member Array Jeff S.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sleepyhead View Post
    Thanks! Very interesting read. Are you the author? If not, do you have a link?

    Thank you. Yes, I am the author, but all I did was read all of the briefs from the current McDonald v. Chicago case.

    The only intellectual idea of my own is the connection and irony between the reason for the 14th Amendment (so color people could be armed and own property even against State laws as well as be counted as citizens) and the fact that the NAACP feels a revival of the P&I clause will be a danger for civil rights. They want one thing: the continued disarmament of colored people.

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    Member Array Jeff S.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by paramedic70002 View Post
    They probably think it was black rabble rousers who defended themselves against whites in the Civil Rights era and now it's evil guns that are keeping black communities down. Classic case of can't see the forest for the trees.
    Yes. In the NAACP LDF's brief, they slyly note how more black people are killed by guns today than were killed during the civil war. There wasn't a citation, so I doubt their claim. Nevertheless, what they fail to note is that gun violence is actually violence commited by humans, and the vast majority of blacks killed are from fellow blacks. In any case, strictly speaking, the color of a person's skin is irrelavant in a murder.

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    Distinguished Member Array nutz4utwo's Avatar
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    Jeff,

    thanks for the informative and researched opinion. I agree with most everything you have said. The ironies of our society seem to have no end.

    A question from above: if a constitutional text sits dormant, is it still valid?

    My answer: The 14th amendment is still part of the constitution and yes, it is valid and yes, it is time to enforce it via full incorporation.

    Unfortunately, doing so would turn the legal system on its head! (all gun convictions and convictions without a grand jury (5th amendment) would need to be reviewed). This won't happen...
    "a reminder that no law can replace personal responsibility" - Bill Clinton 2010.

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    Member Array Jeff S.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nutz4utwo View Post
    Jeff,

    thanks for the informative and researched opinion. I agree with most everything you have said. The ironies of our society seem to have no end.

    A question from above: if a constitutional text sits dormant, is it still valid?

    My answer: The 14th amendment is still part of the constitution and yes, it is valid and yes, it is time to enforce it via full incorporation.

    Unfortunately, doing so would turn the legal system on its head! (all gun convictions and convictions without a grand jury (5th amendment) would need to be reviewed). This won't happen...
    Thank you for the kind words. Yes, the irony of the modern world is something else. Even the names of our two dominate political parties, if examined, is quite humerous.

    The Constitution is the supreme law of the land, so yes even the third amendment is still valid despite its non-use. The Fourteenth Amendment, however, is anything but dormant. It has been read incorrectly.

    The last thing you speak of is called reliance issues.

    "3. Reliance. — However, to overrule a case not the day it was decided but decades later is to introduce additional jurisprudential wrinkles. And here we come to another facet of precedent, namely, its connection to reliance interests." See Amar, pg 156

    You are correct that over-ruling the Slaughter-House cases may prove to be difficult, but it transfers the difficulty to governments. If the handgun ban in Chicago is over-turned, for example, then those who were charged solely for a handgun possession violation will get their day in court, as they should. However, I have a feeling that the majority of cases incolving handgun charges involved felonies outside of weaponry, such as drug possession.

    In the end, reliance issues plays more a role when legal procedures are changed, and not when civil liberties are (correctly) broadened.

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    Distinguished Member Array nutz4utwo's Avatar
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    I shall have to read a little about reliance issues. What of the right to indictment by a grand jury? If we are arguing for full incorporation it may play a role in the justices decision...

    There have been a few SCOTUS rulings that leave me scratching my head. The Slaughterhouse Cases is certainly one of them.

    Staying tuned...
    "a reminder that no law can replace personal responsibility" - Bill Clinton 2010.

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