Deputy shoots S. Carolina homeowner - Page 2

Deputy shoots S. Carolina homeowner

This is a discussion on Deputy shoots S. Carolina homeowner within the Bob & Terry's Place forums, part of the The Back Porch category; Would the homeowner have been shot if he had palmed his pistola or held it behind his back? If the answer is no then I ...

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Thread: Deputy shoots S. Carolina homeowner

  1. #16
    Member Array bullet183's Avatar
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    Would the homeowner have been shot if he had palmed his pistola or held it behind his back? If the answer is no then I think he must bear some of the fault for his decision. Instead of attacking the police we should be discussing this as an opportunity to learn from it. Thank God he survived...for the sake of both parties.

  2. #17
    VIP Member Array jmf552's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Havok View Post
    Thatís also a possibility. We actually had something like this happen in Houston recently. People posing as DEA with a warrant knocking on someoneís door. They werenít good posers, but probably couple have fooled a fair amount of people.
    With outfits like the DEA, I wouldn't know a good poser from a bad one. From the documentaries I've seen, it seems a lot of DEA guys look like criminals. And the average citizen doesn't know what LE procedure is.

    Quote Originally Posted by Havok View Post
    Iím still curious why a police officer was responding to a medical alarm anyway.
    I know in a lot of jurisdictions, if paramedics or any fire department equipment is called, the police are dispatched also. They may only hang around to make sure everything is OK in fire department hands, but they will show up. I called 911 for a gas leak once on the police showed up with the fire department.

    There are some fishy things about this. Every time I've seen a patrol car pull up, to a house at night, all the flashing lights are on. You can see them all up and down the street. To me, that would be a clue it's the police outside.

    Here's what I keep seeing in the news: Law abiding homeowners shot at and hit by cops. Criminals shot at and missed by cops. What is up with all that?
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  3. #18
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    Most area that I have lived in, police respond first to most emergencies to render aid until EMS arrives.

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  5. #19
    Member Array KILTED COWBOY's Avatar
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    Responding police has a tough job.
    But it is their responsibility to make sure they are shooting at the BG.
    Especially when responding to call call at a home.
    Maybe more or better training.
    Also as my dad who was a detective for 30 years used to say.
    Not everyone is cut out to be a cop, he saw the lowering of standards way back in the 70's and predicted big problems back then.
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  6. #20
    VIP Member Array Texas Red's Avatar
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    Look...

    If I'm in my home, asleep in my bed, and there's someone banging on the door in the middle of the night, then I'm not the one who is a threat in this situation.

    I am where I belong, causing no grief whatsoever.

    Anyone disturbing me in this scenario, be they a cop, robber, or anyone else, has come to my home uninvited, unexpected and definitely unwanted.

    The locked iron security door allows me to open the inner door and "converse" with them w/o allowing them access.

    As a matter of fact, two years ago, I DID get a knock on the door at 3am and it was a pair of cops. I opened the inner door and they claimed they were responding to a 911 call. I had to point out to them that they were at the wrong address. And the thing is, my address is very clearly displayed on two locations; painted on the sidewalk and again on the front porch. How tough can this possibly be?

    That security door kept them outside and me inside, allowing the situation to be defused quickly, safely and amicably.

    But it left me with a little less confidence in the local yokels' ability to effectively respond to a real emergency.
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  7. #21
    VIP Member Array Havok's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bullet183 View Post
    Would the homeowner have been shot if he had palmed his pistola or held it behind his back? If the answer is no then I think he must bear some of the fault for his decision. Instead of attacking the police we should be discussing this as an opportunity to learn from it. Thank God he survived...for the sake of both parties.
    How often do you, or most police officers search an area while holding a gun behind your/their back? If the answer is never, then why would that standard be applied to the homeowner here?

    Quote Originally Posted by jmf552 View Post
    With outfits like the DEA, I wouldn't know a good poser from a bad one. From the documentaries I've seen, it seems a lot of DEA guys look like criminals. And the average citizen doesn't know what LE procedure is.


    I know in a lot of jurisdictions, if paramedics or any fire department equipment is called, the police are dispatched also. They may only hang around to make sure everything is OK in fire department hands, but they will show up. I called 911 for a gas leak once on the police showed up with the fire department.

    There are some fishy things about this. Every time I've seen a patrol car pull up, to a house at night, all the flashing lights are on. You can see them all up and down the street. To me, that would be a clue it's the police outside.

    Here's what I keep seeing in the news: Law abiding homeowners shot at and hit by cops. Criminals shot at and missed by cops. What is up with all that?
    I guarantee you wouldnít have opened the door for these guys. Around here police only respond to CPR calls, unless they are added because there are LE duties involved.
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  8. #22
    Member Array alsaqr's Avatar
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    There was a call from the alarm company to the dispatcher. A deputy was dispatched to the home.

    There is a message here: Don't point a gun at the big flashlight shining in your window.

    BTW: Those windows on both sides of the door are stupid.
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  9. #23
    Senior Member Array OneGunTX's Avatar
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    This is troubling on so many levels

    How many problems can you find with the participant's actions based on this description from the article?

    According to Trench, through his attorney, all Trench, 62, knew was that he was awoken in the middle of the night (11:54 p.m. on June 13, according to police reports) by lights outside his home, and he saw someone in his front yard. He grabbed his pistol ó for which he had a concealed carry permit ó and pointed it through the side window at a potential intruder that he did not know was a police officer.

    At this point, the officer opened fire through the side window next to the front door, striking Trench four times. The bodycam footage begins rolling rolling shortly after, when the officer is demanding that Trench throw out his weapon. In the video, the door is clearly closed and Trench is inside his house, contrary to the department's initial claims.

    The video does not indicate whether the officer announced himself as a sheriff's deputy or stated his intentions before opening fire on a resident who was inside his home, but in the video, Trench is clearly unaware that the person who shot him is a sheriff's deputy, as one of the first things he said after being shot was to ask who his shooter was, and then followed that up with, "Oh my God, call the cops, please," to which the deputy responded, "I am the cops."
    Here is what I see:

    1) Cop opened fire first, asked questions afterwards
    2) Cop never identified himself, so homeowner did not know who was shining a flashlight into his home.
    3) Homeowner should have had someone calling 911 while he was investigating what was going on outside his house. Dispatch could have told him it was an officer.

    While I support police officers in shootings and often give them the benefit of any doubt, in this case I am troubled by the failure to ID, shoot first, ask questions afterwards. Especially, since it was night and the homeowner did not know who was prowling around outside his home.
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  10. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Havok View Post
    None of this has anything to do with what I said.

    Iím still curious why a police officer was responding to a medical alarm anyway.
    Not unusual at all. Patrol officers are frequently dispatched to investigate medical emergencies. Not every community has full-time emergency medical personnel, relying on volunteers who must frequently respond from home. Having an officer on hand is a matter of safety as well as providing LE response in the case of assaults, domestic violence, etc. Way before medical alarm devices (or cell phones, or internet) as a young police officer I responded to many, many ambulance calls and fire calls. I have also responded to the scenes of crimes with citizens holding suspects, frequently at gun point.

    I don't know enough about this specific incident to have a firm opinion. I will leave the investigation and determination in the hands of those charged with those responsibilities. Whatever the outcome there is a young sheriff's deputy who will live with his decisions and actions for the rest of his life.
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  11. #25
    VIP Member Array Havok's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by retired badge 1 View Post
    Not unusual at all. Patrol officers are frequently dispatched to investigate medical emergencies. Not every community has full-time emergency medical personnel, relying on volunteers who must frequently respond from home. Having an officer on hand is a matter of safety as well as providing LE response in the case of assaults, domestic violence, etc. Way before medical alarm devices (or cell phones, or internet) as a young police officer I responded to many, many ambulance calls and fire calls. I have also responded to the scenes of crimes with citizens holding suspects, frequently at gun point.

    I don't know enough about this specific incident to have a firm opinion. I will leave the investigation and determination in the hands of those charged with those responsibilities. Whatever the outcome there is a young sheriff's deputy who will live with his decisions and actions for the rest of his life.
    Are police in these areas EMTs or paramedics? Even in areas with volunteer fire departments, Iíve never heard of not having a full time EMS. Thatís new to me.
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  12. #26
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    I agree that the side lights on the front door are stupid. Some comments were made that the homeowner should not have pointed his gun toward the door. I believe the article stated that he was walking away from the door when the office shined his flashlight inside. He then turned around.
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  13. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Havok View Post
    ...

    Iím still curious why a police officer was responding to a medical alarm anyway.
    In two of the last three cities I lived it went like this: if the ambulance goes out, the fire truck goes out (unless there is another call), if the fire truck goes out, a police car is dispatched (unless officers are responding to other calls at that time).

    I do not think it at all unusual for a police car to respond to a medical emergency.

    Besides, it says in the report
    In audio footage provided by the Greenville County Sheriff's Department, an employee of the monitoring company indicates that she is "Donna from Five Star Urgent Response requesting urgent assistance for a subscriber."
    There is no mention this was reported to the sheriff's department as a medical call, merely as an emergency call from a subscriber.
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  14. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by alsaqr View Post
    There was a call from the alarm company to the dispatcher. A deputy was dispatched to the home.

    There is a message here: Don't point a gun at the big flashlight shining in your window.

    BTW: Those windows on both sides of the door are stupid.
    That is your opinion. You could be wrong. I requested mine for a specific reason and have no regrets. Is everything you don't like "stupid"?
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  15. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldVet View Post
    Is everything you don't like "stupid"?
    I don't like you and you're not stupid. Now, if you would send me a Christmas card, I would take back the part about not liking you.
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  16. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by lionround View Post
    I don't like you and you're not stupid. Now, if you would send me a Christmas card, I would take back the part about not liking you.
    Meh, who cares... I don't even like me.
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