Kind of An Odd Question

Kind of An Odd Question

This is a discussion on Kind of An Odd Question within the Bob & Terry's Place forums, part of the The Back Porch category; Mrs OldChap and I have been trying to give some advice to our grand-son-in-law concerning his occupation. He has worked in the oil industry (oilfield ...

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  1. #1
    VIP Member Array OldChap's Avatar
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    Kind of An Odd Question

    Mrs OldChap and I have been trying to give some advice to our grand-son-in-law concerning his occupation.

    He has worked in the oil industry (oilfield chemicals) for a number of years, but he and our grand daughter have grown really weary of the constant ups and downs of the oilfield. They recently moved here to Houston and he found a good job in the (you guessed it) oil industry. Now oil prices go down because of a virus in China (!!!) and they're cutting hours.

    Our grand daughter came to us for advice about what other jobs were out there for a non-college guy besides oil. No question he needs a marketable skill set in another field, but we are both sort of at a loss.

    What occupations have to train a new employee in a skill set because no school offers training for that job? Hopefully some industry that is always looking for new hires and is sort of recession-proof? I was thinking something like auto body repair???

    Seeking some wise counsel.

    Thanks in advance for any thoughts.
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    In know that in Georgia several of the new manufacturers have had to train in-house for precision machine operator positions because the VocTech training...well...sort of sucks from what I'm being told in that area. Southern Co. Power also has an apprentice program that produces some amazingly trained people and SC pays a good wage and is pretty darn recession proof. I've worked with some of their trainers in one of my volunteer positions and its a terrific program from what I can tell.
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    VIP Member Array Havok's Avatar
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    Is there a reason he can’t go to some sort of school to learn a skill? I think that would open up a lot more opportunity than being limited to fields where your new employer will train you. What does he like to do, and what types of things is he good at?
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    Member Array Dial1911's Avatar
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    My friend’s son makes a great living hanging and servicing garage doors. He learned the trade working as an apprentice. Intial pay was tough, but once he had the skills and moved up in the organization things got much better.

    If you really have the home and business growth that I read about, this might be worth looking at.
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    I recommend someone with a high school diploma, clean background check, and a driver's license with a clean record go to utilities and get a job as a meter reader or other entry level position. After you are there and show a good work ethic, you can bid on other jobs that include on-the-job training and apprenticeships.
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    A few ideas:

    Electrical power generation is nearly recession-proof. I'd look more closely at the generating end (power plants, solar & wind power) than the distribution side. Climbing power poles in nasty weather is challenging enough if you're young and healthy, lots less fun as you get older.

    Health care and its associated technological advances (e.g., imaging) is a field that keeps growing.

    If auto repair is appealing, look at trade schools that offer ASE certification, and specializing in electric vehicle technology will probably be a better choice income-wise than auto body repair.
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    Ex Member Array xXxHeavy's Avatar
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    Does he have any carpentry and/or masonry skills...…..hire a few guys always room for a new General Contractor and maybe the beginning of his own business.....
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    When I retired, I checked in with a couple of the local unions, thinking about an apprenticeship. If he's in his 20s or early 30s, this might be an idea. Starting wage is rather rough, and does include yearly raises, but once he gets his journeyman, pay opens up quite a bit.

    FYI: I didn't do it because I retired from the military at 44, and had a few health issues that were slowing me down some at the time, which would have made it difficult for me to compete with others that would have been in the program.
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    VIP Member Array 5lima30ret's Avatar
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    Welder in the shipbuilding industry is a big one in my area, maybe Houston as well. Licensed HVAC techs are always needed in most all areas. Licensed journeyman electrician is another trade needed most everywhere. All these jobs tend to be fairly recession proof IME. Good luck!
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    VIP Member Array OldChap's Avatar
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    Thanks again for all the great suggestions.
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    VIP Member Array Texas Red's Avatar
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    Seems like welders are always in demand. Training wouldn't be too long, I don't think.

    Picking up some computer skills at the local community college and getting a certificate rather than an associate degree might be another avenue.
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    The Marines are always looking for a few good men...

    He needs to find a job in something that he enjoys. Making money is fine, but making money in a job one hates isn't so fine. Sounds like a hands-on guy, so welding, auto repair, A&P tech possibly.
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    Ask him what his "Dream Job" would be. If you do something you enjoy doing, it's not a job it's a career.

    I started as an apprentice with a CAT dealer. It paid a decent wage to start, even back in the Seventies and there was no shortage of hours available. Spent many years in the equipment industry before transitioning full time into the pleasure boat industry. There's a whore's market, boat dealers suck (mostly) and have little if any loyalty to their employees or customers.

    Had my own shop on the west coast and made a lot of money. Now at 67, I work part time selling marine parts and electronics and the rest of the time I'm installing what I've sold and still billing my time at $100 per hour.

    I've said this before. "As long as I have my big red toolbox, I'll never go hungry".

    The key is to find something you "LOVE TO DO" and strive to be the best at doing it.
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    Distinguished Member Array Rabbit212's Avatar
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    HVAC in Houston is a gold mine.
    Welder in Houston tons of work.
    Auto Tech is always in demand.
    No to truck driver its not what it used to be and the future is in driverless trucks.
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    VIP Member Array dangerranger's Avatar
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    If he has a background in Oil field Chemicals, Chemical sales, Chemical testing, etc . There are good jobs in Water treatment. They are nearly recession proof. Water treatment includes Drinking water, Air Conditioning cooling towers, Boilers, and waste water treatment. all of them are good paying jobs. And none require a collage degree. If he likes it he may decide that some collage is needed to move forward, but none is needed to get your foot in the door. Good Luck, DR

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