Tick bites.

Tick bites.

This is a discussion on Tick bites. within the Bushcraft - Primitive Skills - Survival Skills - Camping forums, part of the Related Topics category; Former NC Senator recently passed away due to complications from a tick bite; ticks must be the most evil critters one may encounter. Myself during ...

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  1. #1
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    Tick bites.

    Former NC Senator recently passed away due to complications from a tick bite; ticks must be the most evil critters one may encounter. Myself during a javelina hunt in southern Texas I found a small mark on my leg I thought was just a sticker from a cactus or other plant. Fast forward two weeks later I had this bulls eye rash on my leg. I went to sick call and the flight surgeon looked at the rash and said it appeared to look like Lyme disease, she took a blood sample and since it would take 2 weeks to get the result she went ahead and prescribed antibiotics. The results came back positive and the subsequent tests came back negative. Even 40+ years later I take any tick any tick bite seriously and at the sign of any symptoms I head to urgent care.

    Former Sen. Kay Hagan has died at 66, after complications from a prolonged illness

    Former U.S. Sen. Kay Hagan, D-N.C., died on Monday in her home in Greensboro, North Carolina, according to her family. She was 66.

    "We are heartbroken to share that Kay left us unexpectedly this morning," the family said in a statement. "Kay meant everything to us, and we were honored to share her with the people of North Carolina whom she cared for and fought for so passionately as an elected official."

    Hagan is survived by her husband, Chip, and her three children, Tilden, Jeanette and Carrie.

    In 2016, Hagan contracted a brain inflammation from a tick-borne virus. Hagan was hospitalized in Atlanta for about six months before beginning outpatient treatment, according to the Greensboro News & Record.
    https://abcnews.go.com/Politics/sen-...ry?id=66591473
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    Distinguished Member Array Shootnlead's Avatar
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    I take any tick any tick bite seriously and at the sign of any symptoms I head to urgent care.
    That is a great protocol for everyone to follow!
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    VIP Member Array G26Raven's Avatar
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    msgt/ret, I'm with you, I really hate ticks. One of the great things about living here in Utah is that there are so few ticks. I've only seen one that got on a friend while cleaning a buck, and that's been it. Have never picked up any myself despite all the time I have spent hunting in the brush.
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    I don’t know which I hate more - ticks or fire ants. This past year I had a fire ant bite/sting abscess between my toes, and a tick in he middle of my back I didn’t catch for a week. Deer ticks seem to be the worst around here. I had to get rid of my guinea fowl (roosting on a neighbors house), but when I had them, they took care of ticks.

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    +1 on msgt/ret’s concern about Lyme disease. BTDT just a year ago.

    I read on this or another’s forum the very most dangerous critter in our woods is the yellow jackets that zoom out and attack when we get close to their ground nests. The yellow jackets are vicious, surprising, and poisonous, especially in quantity. Fortunately we only get winged once or twice before we locate their ops base and nuke ‘em. Okay, good until they regroup somewhere else.

    Last year, with no sight of the tick nor the bullseye rash, I rapidly crashed from Saturday night til Monday morning. Crippling pain between my temples, abdominally, and low back. Unable to lie prone or keep food down for five days. I’m one of the fortunate ones, I have access to several good hospitals. I had four ED visits in four days while they tested extensively to rule out aneurism, stroke, gall bladder, and other engine and control problems. 2nd morning I awoke with dramatic Bell palsy R side of my face.

    2nd or 3rd morning they drew blood for test for Lyme disease. I was put in OBS unit fourth night, received doxycycline fifth day, and admitted late on on fifth day. Morning of sixth day the doxycycline had taken effect and I regained some appetite. Slept that day and sixth night, ate huge breakfast seventh morning. A week later the Lyme disease test came back positive. That was a year ago. All good now, I think.

    And last year I had a physical no insurer would have approved normally. Fluoro, CT, ultrasound, extensive blood work, MRI, all served to rule out the usual suspects and prove what we weren’t looking for - I was otherwise really healthy. Lyme disease is called the great imitator. My symptoms were dramatic which resulted in intense investigation to find cause. Many people apparently have milder symptoms of entirely other sorts that may mimic fibromyalgia, multiple sclerosis, or any of many other maladies. Until the disease is treated properly, the host continues to suffer nerve and muscle degradation.

    We’ve always been leery of ticks but now have a special regard for them. We live in the woods, spend a lot of time walking and working there. Our plan is Not so much for prevention but simply vigilance of tick exposure.
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    I was out hunting rock chucks in Eastern WA once and found myself absolutely covered with ticks, having never had a problem with them in that area before. I literally had to strip naked in the middle of that open range land and de-tick myself. I probably had 50-60 ticks on me. The wife found a couple more in my hair when I got home.

    Fortunately nothing became of it, but it was a long time before any of those rock chucks would look me in the eye.
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    A lot of friends who are Texas Game Wardens have recommended this stuff. Put it on you before wandering through the brush/woods.

    https://www.amazon.com/Nantucket-Spi...73a21d9627564f
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    My disabled son who lives in southern Missouri was scouting around looking for places to hunt dear and turkey. The weather was hot this fall and he got into a lot of ticks. He started showing flu like symptoms and they diagnosed him as having alpha-gal a disease caused by bites from the lone star tick. His wife eventually got it too. They must stay away from any products that are derived from mammals. Red meat and dairy and a ton of other things that they are finding out contain allergens. Now they are saying that chiggers carry alpha-gal too.
    It had been a long time since my son had felt well enough to do something like scout around for hunting areas and I was having a lot of fun kidding him about "eating his way through the woods." "There won't be any animals that will be safe."
    Some doctors say that alpha-gal will go away in a few years if you don't get bit by another tick but the allergist that they saw told them that it is permanent because she has treated people who have had it for over ten years.

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    Senior Member Array DownInTheDark's Avatar
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    I found about 5 or 6 ticks on me this year with one embedded. Thankfully the season here is pretty short, but I work outside so I check for them regularly.
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    VIP Member Array G26Raven's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldVet View Post
    I was out hunting rock chucks in Eastern WA once and found myself absolutely covered with ticks, having never had a problem with them in that area before. I literally had to strip naked in the middle of that open range land and de-tick myself. I probably had 50-60 ticks on me. The wife found a couple more in my hair when I got home.

    Fortunately nothing became of it, but it was a long time before any of those rock chucks would look me in the eye.
    Too much information...
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    Ticks can be quite dangerous due to the numerous diseases they carry. To minimize your risk, you can do the following:
    - Apply permethrin to the clothes and accessories (packs, hammocks, sleeping bags, tents, boots) that you routinely use for the foresty outdoors. This generally requires the clothes to be clean, dry, and should be done in a ventilated location that's preferably outside. You should do it at least 24h before putting any of this stuff against your skin. A single application is good for about 3 months if you don't wash the clothes, and 2-3 washes if you do.
    - Apply DEET-containing solution to exposed skin, as well as around the ears and at the hairline. There is little evidence that any DEET concentration works much better than others, so I prefer 10-20% and not higher, as you get similar benefit with less toxicity. You can apply it to the face by spraying your hands and then carefully wiping any area of your face aside from eyes and lips that you want to protect.
    - Check for ticks at least once every 24 hours
    - Remove any tick you find immediately using the tick removal tool, without squeezing it.
    - Do not burn it or treat it with any chemicals
    - If you are traveling an extended distance away from medical help you can ask your physician about doxycycline prophylaxis. A single 100mg tablet can be taken as post-exposure prophylaxis for Lyme disease if you have a tick that may have been on your skin for more than 24 hours. When taken 24-72 hours after exposure it gives you nearly 100% protection against Lyme. It won't help with any viral diseases however.
    - If you have a tick bite and subsequently develop any new rash or fever within the next week, you need to immediately seek medical attention.

  13. #12
    VIP Member Array airslot's Avatar
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    I keep a bottle of 100% DEET in the Jeep. Spray around pant cuffs and exposed skin. It can irritate soft skin, but then, mine is more like hide.
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    VIP Member Array graydude's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gnius View Post
    Ticks can be quite dangerous due to the numerous diseases they carry. To minimize your risk, you can do the following:
    - Apply permethrin to the clothes and accessories (packs, hammocks, sleeping bags, tents, boots) that you routinely use for the foresty outdoors. This generally requires the clothes to be clean, dry, and should be done in a ventilated location that's preferably outside. You should do it at least 24h before putting any of this stuff against your skin. A single application is good for about 3 months if you don't wash the clothes, and 2-3 washes if you do.
    - Apply DEET-containing solution to exposed skin, as well as around the ears and at the hairline. There is little evidence that any DEET concentration works much better than others, so I prefer 10-20% and not higher, as you get similar benefit with less toxicity. You can apply it to the face by spraying your hands and then carefully wiping any area of your face aside from eyes and lips that you want to protect.
    - Check for ticks at least once every 24 hours
    - Remove any tick you find immediately using the tick removal tool, without squeezing it.
    - Do not burn it or treat it with any chemicals
    - If you are traveling an extended distance away from medical help you can ask your physician about doxycycline prophylaxis. A single 100mg tablet can be taken as post-exposure prophylaxis for Lyme disease if you have a tick that may have been on your skin for more than 24 hours. When taken 24-72 hours after exposure it gives you nearly 100% protection against Lyme. It won't help with any viral diseases however.
    - If you have a tick bite and subsequently develop any new rash or fever within the next week, you need to immediately seek medical attention.
    ^^^ Excellent advice.

    All my outdoors clothing is permethrin treated.

    Easiest and most cost effective is to make a permethrin dip using a jug of permethrin from your local ag store. There are formulas and quantities online somewhere that give mix ratios. Or just pour some in a 5 gallon bucket with some water. Wearing rubber gloves soak a piece of clothing (exterior, not undergarments) then hang on a line to thoroughly bake dry in the sun; best done outdoors in the summer. Once dried the permethrin bonds to fabric. Them wash and dry at least once to remove any excess, just in case. That's basically the same as the military dip treatment bags we use. (It's the internet; use this advice with caution and look up the best mix ratios.)

    The permethrin spray cans work too, but get expensive for many sets of outerwear, and probably don't last as long as dip treated.

    I can pick ticks off a fresh deer kill, set them on treated clothing, and they immediately try to run and jump off like they're walking on lava.
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    VIP Member Array OldVet's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by G26Raven View Post
    Too much information...
    The rock chucks would agree.
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    Senior Member Array Stirling XD's Avatar
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    I have a cousin that's a doctor that went with a group of kids from church to Central American country for a mission trip. For whatever reason, they weren't allowed to take bug spray (airline or TSA rules I think). So for bug protection, they bought some permethrin and mixed it up in a 55 gallon drum and everyone came over and dipped their clothes in it and hung them up to dry. He said it worked well for them while they were there.
    Has anyone tried turning the country off and then back on again?

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