Standards of Marksmanship - Page 4

Standards of Marksmanship

This is a discussion on Standards of Marksmanship within the Carry & Defensive Scenarios forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Originally Posted by Andyd While it is helpful to know one's own reactions and preparing one's firarms skills, a huge impact on the outcome of ...

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Thread: Standards of Marksmanship

  1. #46
    JD
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andyd View Post
    While it is helpful to know one's own reactions and preparing one's firarms skills, a huge impact on the outcome of any fight is the aggressiveness that is used by an individual. Take a fist fight of two individuals of about the same physical abilities, the more aggressive one will almost always win.
    What all is encompassed by physical abilities?

    I've seen plenty of aggressive wrestlers and strikers choked out by "passive" BJJ practitioners.

    I've also seen shooters aggressively dump 30 rounds at a Texas Star and not hot a darn thing.

    Aggression / violence of action is a required component for sure but I still want to be more skilled than the other guy.

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  2. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andyd View Post
    While it is helpful to know one's own reactions and preparing one's firarms skills, a huge impact on the outcome of any fight is the aggressiveness that is used by an individual. Take a fist fight of two individuals of about the same physical abilities, the more aggressive one will almost always win.
    The more technically skilled and the one who keeps his head in the fight wins more than sheer aggressiveness. In real fights the factors in order are skill, size, strength, physical condition. Of course nothing matters if you are not willing. What that means is the bigger/stronger person in the fight has a huge advantage. For a smaller person to reliably beat a much bigger/stronger opponent they must be much more skilled. Physical condition is last because if you are big and skilled the fight will not last long enough to be a factor against a smaller less skilled opponent.

    You see there are many factors involved, too many in fact to predict the outcome without knowing the adversary. To assume, for example that because one is an ex con that he is a good fighter would be wrong, but to say that he is not adverse to violence would be correct.

    This is why when I was a cop I strove to be the best, to not only win, but to dominate any fight I was in. Exercise, martial arts, competitive shooting, I took any advanced training available.
    JD, OldVet, OD* and 5 others like this.
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  3. #48
    VIP Member Array Fizban's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andyd View Post
    While it is helpful to know one's own reactions and preparing one's firarms skills, a huge impact on the outcome of any fight is the aggressiveness that is used by an individual. Take a fist fight of two individuals of about the same physical abilities, the more aggressive one will almost always win.
    aggression? … not hardly.
    Think like a man of action - Act like a man of thought

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  5. #49
    VIP Member Array G-man*'s Avatar
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    No conversation on what it takes to win a confrontation of any genre would be complete if one of the most important ingredients was left out of the soup......luck:)
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    " Blessed is that man, who when facing death, thinks only of his front sight.”
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  6. #50
    Senior Member Array M1911A1's Avatar
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    After shooting in IPSC competition for a few years, our group ("club"?) switched to a much more practical form of Practical Shooting.
    In fact, we made it up from scratch, as we went along.

    We had found that IPSC/SWPL shooting was much too formalized, was much too equipment-dependent, and required much too little thought.
    What we wanted was to use everyday guns and everyday rigs (both concealment and military/field) in solving everyday problems.
    We also wanted to include both rifles and shotguns.

    The very first thing that we discovered was "the buzzer effect."
    Those of us who had been high-level IPSC shooters would need to "make ready" before a course-of-fire began, and then they would wait for a start signal before beginning their runs through the course.
    But in the real world, problems just happen, and there is no time to "make ready" for a course-of-fire. Also, there is no "start" signal.

    Some IPSC shooters just couldn't handle this, and a few of them dropped out because they felt that "they couldn't win."
    We tried to instill the concept that there wasn't any "winning score," but rather only a better chance of survival gained from an open, learning-experience culture.
    As I previously wrote, the highest-level IPSC/SWPL competitors just couldn't handle that.

    The biggest hurdle of all, for competitors, was the lack of a consistent "start" signal.
    The best competitive shooters absolutely needed that, and failed completely without it.

    So the "start" signal, I suggest, is the biggest difference between using formal competition as a means of testing defensive skills, versus using much less formal and much more realistic skill tests.


    P.S.: Several of our founding members went on to become part of Colonel Cooper's very first cadre of instructors, at Gunsite. (Not me.)
    msgt/ret and OD* like this.
    Steve
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  7. #51
    JD
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    I don't know where to start with this.

    I need coffee. That's it, I need coffee.

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