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Texas - pocket holsters illegal?

Thread: Texas - pocket holsters illegal?

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  1. rlggray's Avatar

    rlggray said:
    Here in my area, on the Gulf coast half way between Houston and Corpus Christi, I don't see many 30.06 signs at all. But I ain't been looking for em either.

    As far as pocket holsters, if they were illegal, I don't think they would be selling them at Academy and Cabelas and everywhere else.
     
  2. Camjr's Avatar

    Camjr said:
    I rarely if ever see 30.06 signs any more except at hospitals where I live in the DFW area, but much more prevalent in Dallas than Fort Worth or the rest of the Metroplex. 30.07 signs are more common, but I never carry openly. It seems many of the 30.06 signs came down when 30.07 became an option. Business owners I've chatted with didn't like having 2 large-print, imposing signs cluttering up the entrances to their places, and just went with 30.07 or removed both. I've always got a J-Frame 642 in either a Nemesis or Mika pocket holster, whether I have a pistol on my hip or not. Just my $0.02...

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  3. bmcgilvray's Avatar

    bmcgilvray said:
    Austin's a lost cause and the liberal stench is wafting over Dallas to the extent that I'm having to hold my nose when we're in or through there.
    Charter Member of the DC .41 LC Society "Get heeled! No really"

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  4. since9's Avatar

    since9 said:
    Quote Originally Posted by bmcgilvray View Post
    Austin's a lost cause and the liberal stench is wafting over Dallas to the extent that I'm having to hold my nose when we're in or through there.
    I conquer. I came very close to moving to Austin about a decade ago due to the proliferation of IT there, but changed my mind after reviewing its changing demographics. It's like San Fan II.
    I CC'd for 20 years. Then I OC'd for 10 years. These days, it's about 90% CC, 10% OC. // As a Virginia Tech Alum, I say that tragedy was avoidable. Too bad the school's administration didn't learn from their mistakes.
     
  5. OldChap's Avatar

    OldChap said:
    If UT ever closes down, Austin will dry up and blow away with the first blue norther.

    Dallas was starting to be lost many years ago. Most folk fled to the suburbs and immediately became so politically powerful the city of Dallas was unable to annex them.
    "The difference between genius and stupidity is that genius has limits."
     
  6. bigdogtx's Avatar

    bigdogtx said:
    Quote Originally Posted by ButtShot14 View Post
    Well, the liberals seem to be creeping in like cockroaches, mostly in Austin and Houston. We sure would like to see them go somewhere else. Maybe you could transplant a few where you moved to.
    Metroplex as well with all the influx of commifornia companies setting up shop.
     
  7. since9's Avatar

    since9 said:
    [QUOTE=OldChap;7687038]If UT ever closes down, Austin will dry up and blow away with the first blue norther. /quote]

    I think what bigdogTX said might carry the day, instead: "Metroplex as well with all the influx of commifornia companies setting up shop."

    I'm going to compare the numbers using my alma mater, Virginia Tech, as I'm very familiar with the school, city of Blacksburg, and surrounding area (Christiansburg, Montgomery County). It's a well-established and stable region, with just 13.1% and 12.9% population growth over the decades preceding the census years 2000 and 2010. They have some light industry but most people in the surrounding area, really are either there in support of the students, staff, families, and all the derivatives, including people who work at gas stations, movie theaters, restaurants, retailers, utilities, etc. That and there are a significant number of retirees in the area.

    Virginia Tech has 33,403 students, with a town (Blacksburg, VA) population of 44,563 and a metro population of 159,587.

    UT Austin has 51,525 students. If it were truly focused on the university, then using Virginia Tech's largely university-focused numbers, Austin Texas should have a city population of 68,740 and a metro population of 246,167.

    But it doesn't. The numbers are far higher at 950,715 and 2,168,316, respectively. That's 13.8 and 8.8 times higher than proportionally expected, respectively. Put another way, 881,975 (93%) residents of Austin, out of it's full 950,715 complement of residents, have absolutely nothing to do with the university at all. Similar numbers for the metro area (89%).

    Thus, would Austin "dry up and blow away" if UT Austin disappeared?

    Hardly. The area would take about a 10% hit. That's all. The remaining 90% of its people, activities, income, business, etc. have absolutely nothing to do with Austin.

    There's another community with which I'm very familiar, and that's Merced, California, where I lived for a year while stationed at Castle AFB, which shut down in 1995. As I met my ex in Merced in 1991, my in-laws were living there and we continued to keep in touch through about 2005. I heard first-hand reports of the impact of Castle's closure for a decade, and I could see it myself whenever I visited, which was roughly every 2 to 3 years.

    A personal anecdote: My son was living in Merced with his mom in 2015 when he called me up in April of that year and asked, "Dad? Can I come live with you?" It wasn't because he wasn't getting along with his mom. It was because he observed the low quality of education and knew he'd have a much better shot of reaching his dreams if he came to live with me here in Colorado Springs.

    Needless to say, I was tickled pink. :)
    I CC'd for 20 years. Then I OC'd for 10 years. These days, it's about 90% CC, 10% OC. // As a Virginia Tech Alum, I say that tragedy was avoidable. Too bad the school's administration didn't learn from their mistakes.
     
  8. OldChap's Avatar

    OldChap said:
    [QUOTE=since9;7690818]
    Quote Originally Posted by OldChap View Post
    If UT ever closes down, Austin will dry up and blow away with the first blue norther. /quote]

    I think what bigdogTX said might carry the day, instead: "Metroplex as well with all the influx of commifornia companies setting up shop."

    I'm going to compare the numbers using my alma mater, Virginia Tech, as I'm very familiar with the school, city of Blacksburg, and surrounding area (Christiansburg, Montgomery County). It's a well-established and stable region, with just 13.1% and 12.9% population growth over the decades preceding the census years 2000 and 2010. They have some light industry but most people in the surrounding area, really are either there in support of the students, staff, families, and all the derivatives, including people who work at gas stations, movie theaters, restaurants, retailers, utilities, etc. That and there are a significant number of retirees in the area.

    Virginia Tech has 33,403 students, with a town (Blacksburg, VA) population of 44,563 and a metro population of 159,587.

    UT Austin has 51,525 students. If it were truly focused on the university, then using Virginia Tech's largely university-focused numbers, Austin Texas should have a city population of 68,740 and a metro population of 246,167.

    But it doesn't. The numbers are far higher at 950,715 and 2,168,316, respectively. That's 13.8 and 8.8 times higher than proportionally expected, respectively. Put another way, 881,975 (93%) residents of Austin, out of it's full 950,715 complement of residents, have absolutely nothing to do with the university at all. Similar numbers for the metro area (89%).

    Thus, would Austin "dry up and blow away" if UT Austin disappeared?

    Hardly. The area would take about a 10% hit. That's all. The remaining 90% of its people, activities, income, business, etc. have absolutely nothing to do with Austin.

    There's another community with which I'm very familiar, and that's Merced, California, where I lived for a year while stationed at Castle AFB, which shut down in 1995. As I met my ex in Merced in 1991, my in-laws were living there and we continued to keep in touch through about 2005. I heard first-hand reports of the impact of Castle's closure for a decade, and I could see it myself whenever I visited, which was roughly every 2 to 3 years.

    A personal anecdote: My son was living in Merced with his mom in 2015 when he called me up in April of that year and asked, "Dad? Can I come live with you?" It wasn't because he wasn't getting along with his mom. It was because he observed the low quality of education and knew he'd have a much better shot of reaching his dreams if he came to live with me here in Colorado Springs.

    Needless to say, I was tickled pink. :)
    Two facts stand out. First, I would think from your post that you've never set foot in Austin? Sadly, statistics may be used to prove almost any point. "Dry up and blow away" for non-Texans, means to lose the majority of it's influence on the surrounding communities and state as a whole. Much of the economic power of Austin has fled to the suburbs, and those suburbs, being out of the realm of taxation by the city, are so politically powerful that at times Austin must knuckle under to the wishes of those constituents. Walking the ground a little would let you know about that. That phenomena is exactly replicated in Dallas.

    Second, it is glaringly obvious that you only include students in your "analysis" of the economic impact of a university on a city. Do you have any idea what the actual dollar figure is for the impact of UT on the city of Austin? Your post is a university regents' dream...a university consisting of only revenue generating students with zero overhead. In addition, many Texas universities are supported by oil and gas revenue taxes - millions of dollars that disappear if the school goes. UT is no exception.

    Regardless...none of this has the slightest to do with the legality of pocket holsters in Texas. So this is all I'll say about anything off-topic.

    And back on topic. I've decided to try out a method of carry I initially thought might be impractical for a senior such as myself: ankle carry. I've already added a belly band holster to the mix, and I have sent for an Uncle Mike's "Tactical Ankle Holster". I did know a few members of the SWAT team who used this brand and claimed they worked very well for a low priced item. This is me trying to test out other discreet methods of concealed carry at church. Suit jackets lead to heat prostration in the sauna during the endless summer here. We'll see.

    My main problem with ankle carry is that, at my age, when you bend over and get all the way down to your shoe laces level, you tend to want to take care of everything that else might need fixin' while you're there!
    "The difference between genius and stupidity is that genius has limits."
     
  9. Pete63's Avatar

    Pete63 said:
    [QUOTE=OldChap;7691020]
    Quote Originally Posted by since9 View Post

    Two facts stand out. First, I would think from your post that you've never set foot in Austin? Sadly, statistics may be used to prove almost any point. "Dry up and blow away" for non-Texans, means to lose the majority of it's influence on the surrounding communities and state as a whole. Much of the economic power of Austin has fled to the suburbs, and those suburbs, being out of the realm of taxation by the city, are so politically powerful that at times Austin must knuckle under to the wishes of those constituents. Walking the ground a little would let you know about that. That phenomena is exactly replicated in Dallas.

    Second, it is glaringly obvious that you only include students in your "analysis" of the economic impact of a university on a city. Do you have any idea what the actual dollar figure is for the impact of UT on the city of Austin? Your post is a university regents' dream...a university consisting of only revenue generating students with zero overhead. In addition, many Texas universities are supported by oil and gas revenue taxes - millions of dollars that disappear if the school goes. UT is no exception.

    Regardless...none of this has the slightest to do with the legality of pocket holsters in Texas. So this is all I'll say about anything off-topic.

    And back on topic. I've decided to try out a method of carry I initially thought might be impractical for a senior such as myself: ankle carry. I've already added a belly band holster to the mix, and I have sent for an Uncle Mike's "Tactical Ankle Holster". I did know a few members of the SWAT team who used this brand and claimed they worked very well for a low priced item. This is me trying to test out other discreet methods of concealed carry at church. Suit jackets lead to heat prostration in the sauna during the endless summer here. We'll see.

    My main problem with ankle carry is that, at my age, when you bend over and get all the way down to your shoe laces level, you tend to want to take care of everything that else might need fixin' while you're there!
    Totally agree. When I worked in the oil field in south Texas in the 70's, we'd take trips up to Austin. It always felt strange, as we were visiting the "Capitol of Texas", & it had a "smaller town feel" than where I lived.
    Funny you should mention this, as when I "finally do pare down" from my current carry of 4 pistols, I've already purchased an LCR in .357 mag, which will be going in an ankle holster! Got a G29 & G30s which will do belt duty.


    ONCE AGAIN, A SPOT ON POST!
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  10. Havok's Avatar

    Havok said:
    [QUOTE=since9;7690818]
    Quote Originally Posted by OldChap View Post
    If UT ever closes down, Austin will dry up and blow away with the first blue norther. /quote]

    I think what bigdogTX said might carry the day, instead: "Metroplex as well with all the influx of commifornia companies setting up shop."

    I'm going to compare the numbers using my alma mater, Virginia Tech, as I'm very familiar with the school, city of Blacksburg, and surrounding area (Christiansburg, Montgomery County). It's a well-established and stable region, with just 13.1% and 12.9% population growth over the decades preceding the census years 2000 and 2010. They have some light industry but most people in the surrounding area, really are either there in support of the students, staff, families, and all the derivatives, including people who work at gas stations, movie theaters, restaurants, retailers, utilities, etc. That and there are a significant number of retirees in the area.

    Virginia Tech has 33,403 students, with a town (Blacksburg, VA) population of 44,563 and a metro population of 159,587.

    UT Austin has 51,525 students. If it were truly focused on the university, then using Virginia Tech's largely university-focused numbers, Austin Texas should have a city population of 68,740 and a metro population of 246,167.

    But it doesn't. The numbers are far higher at 950,715 and 2,168,316, respectively. That's 13.8 and 8.8 times higher than proportionally expected, respectively. Put another way, 881,975 (93%) residents of Austin, out of it's full 950,715 complement of residents, have absolutely nothing to do with the university at all. Similar numbers for the metro area (89%).

    Thus, would Austin "dry up and blow away" if UT Austin disappeared?

    Hardly. The area would take about a 10% hit. That's all. The remaining 90% of its people, activities, income, business, etc. have absolutely nothing to do with Austin.

    There's another community with which I'm very familiar, and that's Merced, California, where I lived for a year while stationed at Castle AFB, which shut down in 1995. As I met my ex in Merced in 1991, my in-laws were living there and we continued to keep in touch through about 2005. I heard first-hand reports of the impact of Castle's closure for a decade, and I could see it myself whenever I visited, which was roughly every 2 to 3 years.

    A personal anecdote: My son was living in Merced with his mom in 2015 when he called me up in April of that year and asked, "Dad? Can I come live with you?" It wasn't because he wasn't getting along with his mom. It was because he observed the low quality of education and knew he'd have a much better shot of reaching his dreams if he came to live with me here in Colorado Springs.

    Needless to say, I was tickled pink. :)
    What draws people to Austin other than the university though? What is Austin known for? Its definitely a very nice area(other than the people) but I really do think UT is what makes that city, and that without it, most people who are not from there would probably not ever consider moving there.
    We get the government we deserve.
     
  11. OldChap's Avatar

    OldChap said:
    Quote Originally Posted by Havok View Post
    What draws people to Austin other than the university though? What is Austin known for? Its definitely a very nice area(other than the people) but I really do think UT is what makes that city, and that without it, most people who are not from there would probably not ever consider moving there.
    You're right. Most folks I know who have visited Austin say they go for the music in the bars at night. Sort of like a large Bourbon Street experience, minus the Mardi Gras. Most of what keeps the bars open is UT students studying for the next day's exams!!!

    As a nice area to visit, I'll take most places in the Hill Country over Austin any day. Fredricksburg is one we have always enjoyed. And for a thrilling experience in Old West holsters, guns, and clothing, you can visit Texas Jack's Wild West Emporium. Sorry, they don't carry pocket or ankle holsters.

    https://www.texasjacks.com/

    The best thing about this place is that the little lady can shop for clothes, jewelry, hats, and boots if they've a mind, while you browse the guns, knives and stuff!
    "The difference between genius and stupidity is that genius has limits."
     
  12. Havok's Avatar

    Havok said:
    Quote Originally Posted by OldChap View Post
    You're right. Most folks I know who have visited Austin say they go for the music in the bars at night. Sort of like a large Bourbon Street experience, minus the Mardi Gras. Most of what keeps the bars open is UT students studying for the next day's exams!!!

    As a nice area to visit, I'll take most places in the Hill Country over Austin any day. Fredricksburg is one we have always enjoyed. And for a thrilling experience in Old West holsters, guns, and clothing, you can visit Texas Jack's Wild West Emporium. Sorry, they don't carry pocket or ankle holsters.

    https://www.texasjacks.com/

    The best thing about this place is that the little lady can shop for clothes, jewelry, hats, and boots if they've a mind, while you browse the guns, knives and stuff!
    I went to fredricksburg I believe last year. I remember wanting to browse in the gun shop there and my wife was much less excited than I was.
    We get the government we deserve.
     
  13. OldChap's Avatar

    OldChap said:
    Quote Originally Posted by Havok View Post
    I went to fredricksburg I believe last year. I remember wanting to browse in the gun shop there and my wife was much less excited than I was.
    Unless she is a dyed in the wool "north eastern woman", she will enjoy looking at the women's stuff they have at Texas Jack's.


    Edit: My apologies for misspelling "dyed".
    Last edited by OldChap; June 3rd, 2019 at 04:44 PM.
    "The difference between genius and stupidity is that genius has limits."