What determines a Texas LTC resident vs nonresident

What determines a Texas LTC resident vs nonresident

This is a discussion on What determines a Texas LTC resident vs nonresident within the Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Texas only question: What determines if your LTC is resident or non resident? The physical address on the card or your DL? I am active ...

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Thread: What determines a Texas LTC resident vs nonresident

  1. #1
    New Member Array Matth3w's Avatar
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    What determines a Texas LTC resident vs nonresident

    Texas only question:

    What determines if your LTC is resident or non resident? The physical address on the card or your DL? I am active military and have an AZ driver’s license but I live in Texas and the physical address on my permit is Texas. I was also a resident of Texas in El Paso when I took the course and received my first license.

    I would consider that resident. But I’m curious to know for sure.

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    Most states have specific rules governing active duty military applications and renewals for a LTC. You ought to call the TX Department of Public Safety to get the information you need from the source of the regs.
    high pockets, OldVet and OneGunTX like this.
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    Being active military creates several special situations. I am sure there many people on this forum able to answer your inquiry.

    What is your permanent address; that is to say what address does the government consider to be your permanent address?

    Another way to look at it is this: Under what address do you file your Federal Income Taxes? As far as the government is concerned, that is your permanent address of record, and would basically determine whether you need a Texas resident or non-resident license.

    Good luck. Someone on your base of assignment should be able to better answer your question.


    Edit: I just read 1942Bull's answer and he is correct. Someone in the Texas Department of Public Safety, or the Texas State Attorney's Office should have your answers.
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    New Member Array Matth3w's Avatar
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    TX directed me to PA to call the sheriff, but the woman at the licensing office said that if my address said Texas on the permit, it was a resident permit. I realized I asked a similar question here many years ago but now it's different because my license states Texas physical address.

    My federal income taxes are filed under my current Texas address, but I still file Taxes in PA.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Matth3w View Post
    TX directed me to PA to call the sheriff, but the woman at the licensing office said that if my address said Texas on the permit, it was a resident permit. I realized I asked a similar question here many years ago but now it's different because my license states Texas physical address.

    My federal income taxes are filed under my current Texas address, but I still file Taxes in PA.
    OK, I am confused. You have a TX permit an AZ drivers license, and you pay taxes in PA. So I guess you one lived in PA, and I have lived here all my life except when in the Corps. PA says it would consider you a TX resident because you have a TX address. Rereading your OP I see that you have a TX permit with your TX address on it. If you have a TX resident permit it means your are considered a TX resident. That means your renewal application should be under your TX address, which the state obviously origiannly recognized upon issuing you a permit. I suggest you renew as a TX resident if what I have detailed above is accutrate.

    Why TX would direct you to PA to determine TX residency is not understandable. You reside in TX. You need a TX permit. You are in the military and are subject to changing location as ordered, but right now you are in TX, and that is
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    Quote Originally Posted by Matth3w View Post
    Texas only question:

    What determines if your LTC is resident or non resident? The physical address on the card or your DL? I am active military and have an AZ driver’s license but I live in Texas and the physical address on my permit is Texas. I was also a resident of Texas in El Paso when I took the course and received my first license.

    I would consider that resident. But I’m curious to know for sure.
    Texas considers active duty stationed in Texas to be a resident for LTC purposes.
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    Just a side note to the OP. In case you were not aware Texas has no personal income tax. As it looks like you have options you might want to re-evaluate your tax situation.
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    Most states consider active duty military at a permanent duty station to be a resident, if the service member chooses. When I was in Texas, I claimed residency in Texas so I wouldn't have to file state income tax. Obviously, since your permit has your TX address, you have a TX resident permit.

    These benefits do not apply to TDY (like for a school). You can also maintain your home of record (HOR) with the military in whichever state you wish to return after your service.
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    Actually all LTC applicants must reside in Texas SOMETIMES:

    Do I have to be a resident of Texas to obtain a Texas License to Carry a Handgun (LTC)?

    No. Per Texas Government Code §411.173, legal residents of another state or persons who relocate to Texas with the intent to establish residency may obtain an LTC. Those individuals must submit an application, pay the required fees, successfully complete the required training in Texas and submit all supporting documents. They also must submit form LTC-6, two passport style photos and a copy of their out of state driver license or state issued identification card. Note, however, that all LTC applicants must be legal residents of Texas or another state.
    As far as I know, Texas does not have a non-resident LTC. However, with typical Texas 19th century language and wording of state laws, it is confusing. I would call the DPS Licensing Division in Austin and ask them directly. Whatever I told you would probably be open to interpretation.

    Note that current members of the armed forces are exempt from having to take the licensing course, which is only offered in Texas - again as far as I know!
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