How do I learn to shoot without buying a .22? - Page 2

How do I learn to shoot without buying a .22?

This is a discussion on How do I learn to shoot without buying a .22? within the Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; When you look at 9mm pistols, see if there an airsoft/pellet analog of your choice. Sig, for example, has pellet pistol copies of the P226/229’s ...

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Thread: How do I learn to shoot without buying a .22?

  1. #16
    VIP Member Array Cuda66's Avatar
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    When you look at 9mm pistols, see if there an airsoft/pellet analog of your choice.

    Sig, for example, has pellet pistol copies of the P226/229’s as well as their P320’s/M17 pistols.
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  2. #17
    VIP Member Array HotBrass45's Avatar
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    One thing to consider is that you can buy a 9mm platform, then get a .22 rimfire conversion kit for it. An example would be a Kimber, who manufacturers both 1911s and the rimfire kits. You can change calibers in about 1 minute. This way you can shoot both cartridges out of the same platform, so you’re just learning on one gun, not two different guns
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  3. #18
    Member Array Nosler Guy's Avatar
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    You could certainly do a lot worse than a 9mm for a first pistol. I started with a snub nose .357 magnum revolver in double action only. I did have a lot of fun with that little gun but looking back I could have gone with a .38 and been just fine. When it comes to learning how to shoot pistols, larger is easier. The larger the pistol the easier it is to shoot well. This goes against the philosophy of carry guns as they tend to be small in size for better concealment. My suggestion would be to pick a 9mm in the larger sub compact to smaller compact size class. Something around the size of a Glock 19 or Glock 48. I only mention Glock in those sizes because most people are familiar with them. Depending on your budget there are lots of quality 9mm pistols out there. There is a screaming deal on S&W Shield 9mm pistols right now and they are offering a rebate. Palmetto State Armory has them advertised for around $249 before the rebate. They are good quality guns for a very reasonable price. Keep your eyes open and you will find something that meets your needs. I agree with finding somebody that is a teacher for learning how to shoot. You will usually find those types volunteering their time at shooting events like NRA Women on Target.
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  5. #19
    New Member Array Halvorsenb's Avatar
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    I was planning on getting an Rock island cco 1911 in 9mm. I've shot a 1911 before and liked how it felt, just looking for a lighter one if I'm gonna carry it all day.

  6. #20
    VIP Member Array airslot's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Halvorsenb View Post
    I was planning on getting an Rock island cco 1911 in 9mm. I've shot a 1911 before and liked how it felt, just looking for a lighter one if I'm gonna carry it all day.
    Good holster, good GUN BELT, and you shouldn't have a problem with the weight. I recently started carrying a 9mm Colt competition series. Once I found the right position on the belt the weight was not a problem. I had to come forward from the M&P9c's location.
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  7. #21
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    9 mm is inexpensive to shoot, and a great beginners caliber too. Both my wife and I learned on 9 mm. 45 would be fine too, but costs more.
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  8. #22
    VIP Member Array jmf552's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Halvorsenb View Post
    Is this the technique you are referring to?

    https://primitivesurvivors.com/1911-...-pencil-drill/
    That's the basic idea, but that version is less challenging than the one we did. Ours followed the "aim small, miss small" principle.

    We would start with a dot on the paper, not a circle. We would aim at that dot. The first time we "fired" the pencil, it created a second dot, hopefully right below the aiming dot. If the dots were not lined up, we would repeat until we could get the second dot right below the first. Once we could do that, we would keep aiming at the first dot and repeating until all our "shots" would hit that same second dot. You should be able to do any number of "shots" and wind up with only two dots, the aiming dot and the dot you keep hitting over and over. The instructor kept repeating that until we could keep all our "shots" onto one dot, we would not shoot expert. He was relentless. If we even got a few shots into it and we were making multiple dots, we had to start over.

    I will say that this is not an enjoyable drill. It is tedious, frustrating and can be mind-numbingly difficult. I imagine that is why it is falling out of favor. But it got me and that ensign to shoot expert in an hour and I never shot less than expert again. In fact, I went on to compete on a National Match team.

    Some people will say this does not teach you to handle recoil, but it can. We were taught to "ignore" recoil per se. Recoil just happens. You "ride" the recoil and then get the sights back on target. Anticipating recoil leads to micro-flinches. But the process of realigning the sights never changes. So after each pencil shot, we had to tilt the barrel up to re-seat the pencil and then recock the hammer. Then we would have bring the sights back down to alignment. It was like recoil in slow motion. Every time we fired on the range, the sights were taken off target upwards by recoil and we realigned the same way. Handling recoil is just not anticipating and creating that mental "rhythm" of realignment.

    A more challenging version of the pencil technique is shown on YouTube by former SEAL sniper and shooting instructor Chris Sajnog. He prints out a line of dots on a piece of paper. He aims at each one in turn. When he is done, he should have a line of dots below the printed dots that are as even as the printed dots. I haven't tried that one yet, but I plan to.
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  9. #23
    VIP Member Array Chuck808's Avatar
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    I’ve never owned a 22 pistol, and only shortly owned a 22 rifle, after learning how to shoot on other center fire guns.

    My advice is buy the gun you want to use. If you’re planning to concealed carry, buy the gun you want to carry and learn to shoot with that. I suggest anyone’s first gun being a defensive handgun, usually a semi auto. Mine was a Glock 19. It served me well. The first rifle that I spent time with and learned how to shoot a rifle on was my WASR AK47.

    Don’t worry about anticipating recoil. You will learn how to mitigate that regardless of what you shoot, within reason. Obviously a snub nose airweight with 357 magnums, you’re going to develop a massive flinch. But with a regular 9mm? You should be good to go. Just buy a case or two of ammo and get some good training.

  10. #24
    Member Array mrtimm's Avatar
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    Training, training training. They'll provide you with the tools you need, then you can decide what to buy.

  11. #25
    VIP Member Array SpringerXD's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Halvorsenb View Post
    Backstory:
    I want to buy a gun. I've shot guns before, but never enough to develop habits, good or bad. I read pretty much everywhere that you should start with a .22 rifle, then a .22 revolver, then a centerfire pistol, so as not to get into bad habits with recoil anticipation. I am a young married guy working my way through school and cant afford more than 1 gun right now, and the belt/holster/carry permit to go with it.

    The actual question:
    How can I buy a 9mm and not get into bad habits anticipating recoil? Tons of dry fire practice is the only thing that comes to mind. What other things could I do to learn to shoot well without having to buy a .22?
    The .22 caliber advice is typically for children/young teens as a first rifle or handgun. You as an adult will have no trouble starting above that.
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  12. #26
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    Join the US Military and they'll give you that training AND pay you while you train!
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  13. #27
    VIP Member Array OldChap's Avatar
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    You probably need to read a little as well. I highly recommend this little book. Very well written and loaded with methods to learn the principles of marksmanship. Much easier than joining the Marines:

    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/16...?ie=UTF8&psc=1
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  14. #28
    VIP Member Array dangerranger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Halvorsenb View Post
    Backstory:
    I want to buy a gun. I've shot guns before, but never enough to develop habits, good or bad. I read pretty much everywhere that you should start with a .22 rifle, then a .22 revolver, then a centerfire pistol, so as not to get into bad habits with recoil anticipation. I am a young married guy working my way through school and cant afford more than 1 gun right now, and the belt/holster/carry permit to go with it.

    The actual question:
    How can I buy a 9mm and not get into bad habits anticipating recoil? Tons of dry fire practice is the only thing that comes to mind. What other things could I do to learn to shoot well without having to buy a .22?
    For a first gun , that you are going to carry, you are just going to have to settle your self that there are some compromises between the best carry gun and the best first gun.

    For a best first gun I would want it to have a full sized grip, good sized sights, and a longer sight radius. a little extra weight would not be bad either. [ it helps tame recoil].
    My best carry gun has none of those things. It has a short little grip, almost no sights, and less than a 2" barrel. All those things make it easier to carry, Not easier to shoot.

    The smallest gun I would get to learn on would be S&W Shield size, Or Ruger SP101 sized [with a 3" barrel.] You could do very well with a Glock 19, or similar sized guns. and still be carry sized. Right now on the used market Beretta has their Cheeta. It's a .32 that was bought back from a police department [probably in South America]. The price is right, they are larger than a pocket gun, but the down side is .32 ammo is expensive.
    Or a Star BM in 9mm, Both are under $200, Both were guns carried by both Military and police, Both would leave you with money to buy ammo! And a lesson or two in safety, gun handling, and marksmanship.
    https://www.jgsales.com/star-bm,-9mm...-p-101051.html

    Good Luck with what ever you pick. DR

  15. #29
    VIP Member Array multistage's Avatar
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    Here’s the problem:

    We can no more tell you what gun to buy than to tell you what vehicle to buy. Too many makes and models.

    As a full grown adult, you CAN run the cartridge of your choosing, be it a 9, 40, or 45. A 22 is hardly a requirement to get you started. Redundant.

    If you want to run a 1911 chambered for 9mm, get one, the one you want. Get a proper holster, belt, ammo, and a few extra magazines.

    Then find a guy (the RIGHT guy) to show you how to run it. Not the arrogant know-it-all one typically encounters at the range. There are many who have the skill and patience to show you the way. They are all to happy to help you out. Finding one isn’t hard. They’ll listen more than they’ll speak.

    A 22 is a useful, enjoyable round. But not mandatory in your position.

    As G-Man advised, the teacher will have you running in short order.

  16. #30
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    The worst thing you could get for a first gun is some dinky pocket pistol. They are difficult for experienced shooters to aim and operate. I would recommend a pistol large enough to fill your hand and point naturally. A longer barrel will have a longer sight radius and make things easier to hold steady. Then you are in the boat of having to buy that slick and sexy micro James Bond gun. Might as well have bought that .22 to begin with.

    You are looking at a mid sized pistol. That could be ok, depending on how it fits you. Lighter means more recoil. I really don't notice a few...several ounces on a good belt. So, how to become more proficient?

    Yes, find a good instructor. And then dry fire. Get snap caps (I like A-zoom). Practice, practice, practice everything you learn from your instructor. Drill, drill, drill everything, except for recoil with dry fire. Dry fire will get all of your fundamentals down (and it's free). Then take it to the range to learn recoil management.
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