How do I learn to shoot without buying a .22?

How do I learn to shoot without buying a .22?

This is a discussion on How do I learn to shoot without buying a .22? within the Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Backstory: I want to buy a gun. I've shot guns before, but never enough to develop habits, good or bad. I read pretty much everywhere ...

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Thread: How do I learn to shoot without buying a .22?

  1. #1
    New Member Array Halvorsenb's Avatar
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    How do I learn to shoot without buying a .22?

    Backstory:
    I want to buy a gun. I've shot guns before, but never enough to develop habits, good or bad. I read pretty much everywhere that you should start with a .22 rifle, then a .22 revolver, then a centerfire pistol, so as not to get into bad habits with recoil anticipation. I am a young married guy working my way through school and cant afford more than 1 gun right now, and the belt/holster/carry permit to go with it.

    The actual question:
    How can I buy a 9mm and not get into bad habits anticipating recoil? Tons of dry fire practice is the only thing that comes to mind. What other things could I do to learn to shoot well without having to buy a .22?

  2. #2
    VIP Member Array G-man*'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Halvorsenb View Post
    Backstory:
    I want to buy a gun. I've shot guns before, but never enough to develop habits, good or bad. I read pretty much everywhere that you should start with a .22 rifle, then a .22 revolver, then a centerfire pistol, so as not to get into bad habits with recoil anticipation. I am a young married guy working my way through school and cant afford more than 1 gun right now, and the belt/holster/carry permit to go with it.

    The actual question:
    How can I buy a 9mm and not get into bad habits anticipating recoil? Tons of dry fire practice is the only thing that comes to mind. What other things could I do to learn to shoot well without having to buy a .22?
    I have taught many, many females who have never fired a weapon before how to shoot without recoil anticipation with a 9mm or 38 spl service revolver, so sir, you can learn also.

    My advice will be to find someone who is a teacher, and not just an instructor to work with you.
    That is the shortest route to quick success.
    " Blessed is that man, who when facing death, thinks only of his front sight.”
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  3. #3
    Member Array arte710's Avatar
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    But on a limited budget, you'll get a lot more .22 ammo than 9 mm...

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    Senior Member Array M1911A1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by G-man* View Post
    ...My advice will be to find someone who is a teacher, and not just an instructor to work with you.
    That is the shortest route to quick success.
    That's excellent advice!

    Your learning regimen should include a lot of preparatory dry-fire (no ammunition) practice, during which you should be supervised in learning grip technique, sight-picture maintenance, and index-finger isolation.
    You don't need to know what those things are yet, as long as your chosen teacher does. So ask, and critically consider the clarity of the teacher's explanation.
    Steve
    Retired Leathersmith and Practical Shooter

    "Qui desiderat pacem, præparet bellum."

  6. #5
    VIP Member Array Havok's Avatar
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    You dont need to buy 3 rimfire guns before buying a centerfire gun. There is nothing wrong with buying a 9mm for your first gun. First handgun I ever shot was a 9mm and first I ever bought was a .45. It sounds like you are wanting a carry gun, and are on a tight budget. Id say look into the gun you want to buy to carry, maybe rent some guns at the range, see what you like, and buy one, then take a pistol class. No use in buying a .22 if its going to prevent you from buying a gun that you can carry, and learning how to use it.
    We get the government we deserve.

  7. #6
    Distinguished Member Array KILTED COWBOY's Avatar
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    I learned to shoot a .45 1911 by my father in my teens.
    You do not need to start with a .22 to learn to shoot a handgun effectively.
    On a small budget get what you think you need to carry for your defense.
    As you start making more money you can then add more ponies to the stable

  8. #7
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    I agree that you should find a source of good instruction. There are good basic firearms courses that teach the basics in a classroom and then familiarize you with firing a pistol or a rifle. There are also personal trainers but they are likely to be more expensive.

    I want to address that beginners should state with low caliber guns when they first learn. Learning to control a 22 is not learning to control a larger caliber. If you want to have a 9mm pistol, learn to shoot a 9mm from the getgo. Every year thousands of people join the military. They go through the same sequence of training that I did 60 years ago. First hours in the classroom, then hours learning to disassemble, clean, and reassemble the weapon you will be shooting. Then dry fire practice of stance, grip, sighting, etc. Then finally supervised live fire training with personal instruction when necessary, and everybody needs some for different reasons. Once you have that down you actually get to shoot without someone looking over your shoulder.

    Now here is the thing. That training begins with the standard rifle or pistol in use at that time. There is no graduated caliber learning/shooting there. You learn on the weapon you will use. Every year thousands of mean women learn to shoot that and they succeed.

    Find a good instructor or course of instruction. If you let people on the Forum know where you are from and ask for recommendations you might just get some good ones. And do know that you can get basic training at many local ranges where you can rent a gun while learning the basics.

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    Motivation and an a mind open to being coached are more important than the tool you start out with, within limits. A .454 Casull, for example, would not serve well as a beginner's gun.
    Smitty
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    Good advice has been offered and most support your desire to start with a 9mm. I would offer a suggestion for consideration as you look for a 9mm if you choose to go this route. It will be easier to learn to shoot if you choose a pistol that is not a super small one. Larger pistols are easier for most persons to learn to shoot. A Glock M19 or S&W M&P Compact are easily concealable for most persons with the right belt and holster. The larger pistol makes the recoil easier to deal with learning. The longer sight radius and longer grip make shooting easier, too.

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    VIP Member Array hogdaddy's Avatar
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    If your not shy about a 4 in 38 sp. would not be a bad on to start with. S&W md 10 comes to mind ; )
    H/D
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    Distinguished Member Array DownInTheDark's Avatar
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    My first handgun was a J-frame 357 mag. I still cant hit anything with it but I didn't pick up any non curable bad habits.
    Bad Bob and ETXhiker like this.

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    A defensive caliber isn't a bad start, just be aware a short , small gun is typically more difficult to learn on that a full size.
    "In matters of style, swim with the current; in matters of principle, stand like a rock." Thomas Jefferson


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    VIP Member Array jmf552's Avatar
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    I saw a Senior Chief Navy Small Arms Marksmanship Instructor (SAMI) take a petite female ensign who had never fired a gun before and got her to qual as an Expert with a standard issue .45 1911, with just one hour or training and dry fire, using the pencil technique. The first live fire she ever did was the qual. He got me to qual Expert the same way, but I had been shooting for a while.

    I'm surprised that technique has fallen out of favor, but I've heard the SEALs still use it.
    Attack Squadron 65 "Tigers", USS Eisenhower '80 - '83, peackeeping w/Iran, Libya, Lebanon and E. Europe

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    Quote Originally Posted by Halvorsenb View Post
    I read pretty much everywhere that you should start with a .22 rifle, then a .22 revolver, then a centerfire pistol, so as not to get into bad habits with recoil anticipation.
    What you read is very good advice when you are ready to start teaching your 6 or 7 year old how to shoot. It is silly, useless, advice for adults.

    Do what @G-man* says. You'll be fine.
    Getting old was not on my list of "things to do" in the Golden Years!

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  16. #15
    New Member Array Halvorsenb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jmf552 View Post
    I saw a Senior Chief Navy Small Arms Marksmanship Instructor (SAMI) take a petite female ensign who had never fired a gun before and got her to qual as an Expert with a standard issue .45 1911, with just one hour or training and dry fire, using the pencil technique. The first live fire she ever did was the qual. He got me to qual Expert the same way, but I had been shooting for a while.

    I'm surprised that technique has fallen out of favor, but I've heard the SEALs still use it.
    Is this the technique you are referring to?

    https://primitivesurvivors.com/1911-...-pencil-drill/

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