Cold Weather Carry Access

Cold Weather Carry Access

This is a discussion on Cold Weather Carry Access within the Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; The weather in Missouri has been up and down this past fall into early winter. One day its freezing with snow and the next we ...

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 30
Like Tree41Likes

Thread: Cold Weather Carry Access

  1. #1
    Distinguished Member
    Array Old Man's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Somewhere Warm
    Posts
    1,536

    Cold Weather Carry Access

    The weather in Missouri has been up and down this past fall into early winter. One day its freezing with snow and the next we are approaching 70 degrees. Today the temperature has dropped back down to more seasonal ones. As I stepped out tonight to walk up the street to the mail box that serves our cluster of houses I had on my coat, hat, and gloves along with a carry pistol and spare mag. As I was walking along I was thinking about my carry method.

    Here are some questions to ponder upon.

    If you live in a cold climate, what do you do about access to your firearm when you are dressed for the cold?

    Do you change carry methods or locations?

    If you pocket carry, have you practiced drawing with your gloves on?
    forester58 likes this.

  2. #2
    VIP Member Array forester58's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    Wyoming
    Posts
    3,620
    I simply move my 642 from its Kydex AIWB holster to a coat pocket, usually left side so I can have hand on gun with less suspicion. Or, I have 2 snubbies, one AIWB and one in the left coat pocket. No, I do not use a holster in my coat as a 12 pound trigger is plenty safe in a coat and a holster would hamper shooting from my pocket.
    I rarely wear gloves even in sub zero weather but, if I have to handle a cold steering wheel or something I use fingerless wool gloves so handling and shooting a gun is not impaired. I have done so many years where I have to take notes outdoors that the fingerless just serve me better. If I had to wear normal gloves they would be snug fitting and thin.

    When it gets down in the minus teens and twenties I just keep my un-gloved left hand on the gun in my coat pocket and stuff the left glove in my other pocket in case I need it. There are always ways to be prepared with a little effort.

  3. #3
    Member Array aikironin21's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Location
    US
    Posts
    62
    Here in California, I get away with basically a hoodie year round. I carry strong side, IWB, at about 2:30. It's easy enough to access and draw my weapon as trained. Support hand grabs cover garment(s), and anchors to chest. Strong hand establishes grip etc.
    I'm the past, during a heavy rainy season, I have worn heavier, longer, jackets, and did use a shoulder rig, to carry my Deagle(.357mag). It just seemed just as, if not more, efficient, to partially unzip my coat, with my strong hand, while cheating my pistol closer with my support hand. There can be a definite flagging or lasering issue, of the support arm, when doing this. I used to carry my Deagle half cocked, safety off, with a round in the chamber, and would cock as I pressed out to full presentation. That way, even if in a hurry, I laser my support arm, along with keeping my finger off the trigger, my pistol isn't in a fireable condition.
    I would think in a heavy coat situation, maybe a chest rig would be more efficient, if you can't get away with a shorter coat, you can pull up to access your weapon. I haven't experimented with any chest rigs though.

    Sent from my moto z3 using Tapatalk

  4. Remove Advertisements
    DefensiveCarry.com
    Advertisements
     

  5. #4
    Distinguished Member Array DownInTheDark's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Flat side of Montana
    Posts
    1,217
    Where I live its flannel season 9-10 months out of the year. I tend to carry a Glock 22 or 23.

    During the summer I normally carry a J-frame or G43, which a t-shirt can hide on me.

  6. #5
    VIP Member Array Havok's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    US
    Posts
    7,181
    Where I live, cold weather means I wear jeans and flip flops instead of shorts and flip flops. My carry doesnt really change throughout the year.
    We get the government we deserve.

  7. #6
    Distinguished Member Array Novarider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    East TN
    Posts
    1,683
    Quote Originally Posted by forester58 View Post
    I simply move my 642 from its Kydex AIWB holster to a coat pocket, usually left side so I can have hand on gun with less suspicion. Or, I have 2 snubbies, one AIWB and one in the left coat pocket. No, I do not use a holster in my coat as a 12 pound trigger is plenty safe in a coat and a holster would hamper shooting from my pocket.
    I rarely wear gloves even in sub zero weather but, if I have to handle a cold steering wheel or something I use fingerless wool gloves so handling and shooting a gun is not impaired. I have done so many years where I have to take notes outdoors that the fingerless just serve me better. If I had to wear normal gloves they would be snug fitting and thin.

    When it gets down in the minus teens and twenties I just keep my un-gloved left hand on the gun in my coat pocket and stuff the left glove in my other pocket in case I need it. There are always ways to be prepared with a little effort.
    Have you ever practiced shooting from a pocket? I'm curious if the fabric of the pocket can get caught in the cylinder or hammer and make the gun useless.
    forester58 likes this.

  8. #7
    Distinguished Member Array RedSafety's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    Location
    Springfield, MO
    Posts
    1,720
    I'm having issues too. Coat in the morning, which means shoulder holster. Afternoon is long sleeve weather, so change over to vest carry. Only other option is my 3Speed all day, but may or may not work with the jobs that day. I could be standing all day or I could be working on my back or crawling around to get to a maintenance issue.
    Old Man likes this.
    When seconds count, help is only 18+ minutes away!

  9. #8
    Ex Member Array Cypher's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    705
    I live in Colorado, it's currently 25 degrees with a wind chill of 12.

    I've worked as a security guard for the last 12 years. Mostly at night and mostly outside. The reason that's relevant is because I have a lot of interaction with the cops and I watch them and I watch how they do things. One thing that I've noticed is that no matter how cold it gets I almost never see a cop in a coat, at most I see them wearing a light fleece. So that's how I try to dress

    When I'm at work I layer up from the inside and keep my coat as light weight as I can. Last winter I didn't need a coat until it got down to 12 below. I do the same thing at home just not with my uniform as the outermost layer. If I'm at home and I'm just going to the mail box and back I put on a Columbia fleece

    I have to use a phone at work to scan checkpoints while I'm making rounds so I wear light gloves and cut the trigger finger off. When I'm not at work I don't wear gloves.

    And always a good Thinsulate lined beanie

    Last edited by Cypher; December 28th, 2019 at 08:38 PM.

  10. #9
    Ex Member Array Cypher's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    705
    Quote Originally Posted by Novarider View Post
    Have you ever practiced shooting from a pocket? I'm curious if the fabric of the pocket can get caught in the cylinder or hammer and make the gun useless.
    forester58, Novarider and Old Man like this.

  11. #10
    New Member Array rlggray's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    904
    Fortunately, that's 1 less thing that I have to worry about. Where I live, a flannel shirt is about all that is required for about 99% of the winter season.

    For the other 1% of the time, I just throw on a light jacket and don't change the way I'm carrying.

  12. #11
    Member Array aikironin21's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Location
    US
    Posts
    62
    Quote Originally Posted by Cypher View Post
    I live in Colorado, it's currently 25 degrees with a wind chill of 12.

    I've worked as a security guard for the last 12 years. Mostly at night and mostly outside. The reason that's relevant is because I have a lot of interaction with the cops and I watch them and I watch how they do things. One thing that I've noticed is that no matter how cold it gets I almost never see a cop in a coat, at most I see them wearing a light fleece. So that's how I try to dress

    When I'm at work I layer up from the inside and keep my coat as light weight as I can. Last winter I didn't need a coat until it got down to 12 below. I do the same thing at home just not with my uniform as the outermost layer. If I'm at home and I'm just going to the mail box and back I put on a Columbia fleece

    I have to use a phone at work to scan checkpoints while I'm making rounds so I wear light gloves and cut the trigger finger off. When I'm not at work I don't wear gloves.

    And always a good Thinsulate lined beanie
    That's true. I used to wear micro fleece under my uniform too. I worked a prison yard for sixteen years. I didn't like wearing rain coats or jackets, because they covered up all my force multipliers. The best, thing to wear, when it was raining, but too warm for the fleece, was a good old fashioned pancho. Of course we don't carry guns inside, but a pancho allowed quick access to everything, baton, grenades, pepper spray.
    When I would work with people, who didn't normally work outside, they always wore too much, trying to maintain a level of comfort. After about three years on the yard, I gave up on being comfortable. Expensive jackets (within uniform regs), never delivered on the comfort, and seemed to just make gear harder to get to.
    Carrying concealed, however, is a different animal. I don't have uniform regulations my coats have to fit into. My weapon's holster and other carriers, are designed to be concealed, and low profile. Sure, they add a couple of inches in circumference, but when buying a coat, it's easy to take that into account. The amount of gear worn for duty, and the design of the carriers, are bulky. Uniform coats have cutouts for a firearm or baton, but cover everything else. If you can get away with wearing a coat that isn't too long, that you can clear like any other cover garment, then that's probably the way to go, and if it's super cold, add an under layer, rather bulking up over your weapon.

    Sent from my moto z3 using Tapatalk
    TSKnight likes this.

  13. #12
    VIP Member Array dangerranger's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Exact center of CA
    Posts
    5,617
    Altho it never gets that cold where I live, One of my sons worked in a Northern mountain area that regularly got extremely cold. On the coldest days he would carry a Glock. He said the plastic would warm up next to his skin much better than an all steel pistol. The steel would suck the heat away from him.

    My own changes are just moving the gun from a jean pocket to a coat pocket.
    One thing I have found about coat pocket carry is, If I am going to several non permissive areas where I would have to disarm, having the gun in a coat pocket I just swap out the coat for a lighter jacket. No one sees anything but an old guy putting his coat in the trunk. For my wife's work I would sometimes make several trips a day to the Post Office, Courthouse, or Government center. DR
    Old Man likes this.

  14. #13
    VIP Member Array forester58's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    Wyoming
    Posts
    3,620
    Quote Originally Posted by Novarider View Post
    Have you ever practiced shooting from a pocket? I'm curious if the fabric of the pocket can get caught in the cylinder or hammer and make the gun useless.
    Yes, I have ruined a few Goodwill jackets doing just that. My 642 has no exposed hammer but I have done the same with a Speed six that had a bobbed hammer and they always shot to empty. Ideally a totally covered hammer is best.
    The one negative is it did cause the material to smoke and I was a little concerned about some synthetic material catching fire.
    Some of my older revolvers have a hammer mounted firing pin and I suspect these,even bobbed might catch that pin on material but, I have never tried it with the older guns.
    The cylinder has yet to catch any material.
    M1911A1 and Rock and Glock like this.

  15. #14
    Ex Member Array Cypher's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    705
    I live in a town with five military installations so can get an entire set of these (all 4 pieces) for about 15 bucks at just about any surplus store a d they are orders of magnitude better than the old brown polypropylenes



    See next post for second video
    Rock and Glock likes this.

  16. #15
    Ex Member Array Cypher's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    705
    Rock and Glock likes this.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Sponsored Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •