Trigger reset question

Trigger reset question

This is a discussion on Trigger reset question within the Defensive Carry Guns forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; New shooter here...my wife and I have been shooting 3x so far, once for a beginner class, once with rental guns, and once with our ...

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Thread: Trigger reset question

  1. #1
    Member Array namtrag's Avatar
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    Trigger reset question

    New shooter here...my wife and I have been shooting 3x so far, once for a beginner class, once with rental guns, and once with our new pistols. We have been watching some YouTube videos on trigger control, and it really bothers us that in most of them, the maker of the video tells you to wait to hear the click that indicates the gun has reset. How can you hear the click when you have ear protection on?

    Seriously though, what I have been doing is letting the trigger completely back out before shooting again. Is this correct, or am I supposed to just let it out to the reset point, then get my sight picture, then pull the trigger again? The reason I have been letting the trigger all the way out is that I want to take my time since I am a beginner.

    Thanks for the help!

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    VIP Member Array sdprof's Avatar
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    Even with ear pro, you can hear and feel the reset click. It may be more distinct with some guns than others.

    Is that the one and only way to shoot? No. Some other instructors do advise to let the trigger go all the way forward.

    Going just to reset can make for a bit faster shooting. Right now, you probably need to be working on consistent, accurate shooting.

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    Member Array namtrag's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sdprof View Post
    Even with ear pro, you can hear and feel the reset click. It may be more distinct with some guns than others.

    Is that the one and only way to shoot? No. Some other instructors do advise to let the trigger go all the way forward.

    Going just to reset can make for a bit faster shooting. Right now, you probably need to be working on consistent, accurate shooting.

    Welcome the club.
    Thanks so much...we weren't even listening for it because we just figured we wouldn't be able to hear it. I will let the trigger out slowly a few times at the range next time so I can better feel where the reset point is. From what I have seen, it's pretty short on my pistol, an M&P 9c.

    It's hard to practice this at home because I can't pull the trigger a second time unless I re-rack the gun.

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    "Shooting from reset" isn't anything you need to worry about for right now - it's a mid-level skill. Get comfortable shooting for now, concentrating on grip, sight picture, and trigger press. In shooting a succession of shots - I won't even say rapid fire - it's best if you simply don't let your trigger finger lose contact with the trigger. The temptation for a lot of new shooters is to run the finger all the way to the front of the trigger guard after a shot. Then the finger gets a "running start" for the next shot and effectively impacts the trigger, which will likely pull the shot.

    As sdprof stated, you'll probably feel the reset more than hear it. You don't need to shoot live ammo to experience this: with the gun unloaded, no ammo anywhere in the room (standard practice for dry fire), rack the slide, pull the trigger until you hear/feel the striker release, and leave your finger all the way back on the trigger. Rack the slide, then slowly ease the trigger forward until you feel/hear it reset. Now press the trigger back until it "fires." "Rinse and repeat" until you get a feel for where the reset point is.
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    Member Array gqllc007's Avatar
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    Poster above nails it
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    Gotcha, guys! I will give it a try tonight. I sat and "shot" wall sockets last night while watching the football game, just trying to get used to focusing on the front sight, and to get the trigger pull down (also switching hands, as I still haven't figure out which hand I should shoot with lol). These tips help a lot, and I really appreciate that you guys are so helpful to us noobs!

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    Member Array jumperj's Avatar
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    If you're right handed, you probably shoot with that hand or vice-versa. It's good though to get a feel for one handed shooting with both hands, but that will come later on. Right now, I would just concentrate on SAFETY, shot placement, SAFETY, trigger control, SAFETY, and grip. You'll get a feel for where your trigger resets as you get more familiar with your firearm. Stay SAFE and good luck

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    Member Array namtrag's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jumperj View Post
    If you're right handed, you probably shoot with that hand or vice-versa. It's good though to get a feel for one handed shooting with both hands, but that will come later on. Right now, I would just concentrate on SAFETY, shot placement, SAFETY, trigger control, SAFETY, and grip. You'll get a feel for where your trigger resets as you get more familiar with your firearm. Stay SAFE and good luck
    I have another thread where I explain, but basically, I am half lefty and half righty, but not ambidextrous, and definitely am left eye dominant. So I am trying two-handed shooting using either hand as the one pulling the trigger. I went last Friday and tried some each way, but did it on the same target. Next time I will do a separate target for each hand just to see.

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    If you're left-eye dominant, then shoot lefty if you can. That precludes a lot of problems that arise from cross-eye dominance. Be sure to practice shooting righty as well, though.

    One other dry-fire drill is to work the trigger with a penny lying flat on the top of your slide right next to the front sight. You need to be able to complete the trigger press without the coin falling off the gun. This is an even better drill if you have a conventional DA gun where you can keep stroking the trigger without working the slide.
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    Member Array namtrag's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gasmitty View Post
    If you're left-eye dominant, then shoot lefty if you can. That precludes a lot of problems that arise from cross-eye dominance. Be sure to practice shooting righty as well, though.

    One other dry-fire drill is to work the trigger with a penny lying flat on the top of your slide right next to the front sight. You need to be able to complete the trigger press without the coin falling off the gun. This is an even better drill if you have a conventional DA gun where you can keep stroking the trigger without working the slide.
    Yeah, I am leaning towards lefty, but my wife said it looked like I shot better righty as she observed me at the range. I was a good boy and just concentrated on the front sight, so I have no idea which hand was more accurate! lol

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    Some folks squeeze the grip SOOOO TIGHTLY as to negates most of the "sensitivity" in their trigger finger. Yet "riding the sear" is primarily a pro (competition) shooter's technique for shaving fractions-of-seconds off of their split-times. IMHO, it is (at best) an advanced pistolero's concern. Meaning there are a lot of basics that need to be practiced (...practiced, practiced) before a defensive shooter need concern themself with it.

    On the other hand, over-squeezing the grip is a MUCH more common (and less discussed) handgunner's issue. You need to allow your trigger finger to move freely & independently from the rest of the fingers on your dominate hand. If your forearm is rock-hand from your grip? That won't happen. So try this, don't grip the pistol with your forearms. Use your pectoral (chest) muscles to press your palms squarely toward one-another from either side of the grip. In a two-handed grip, it'll ideally control your pistol. Now, with a relaxed forearm (on your dominate hand) you'll be AMAZED at the control & "feel" you'll now discover in your trigger finger. Hits will become easier & faster.
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    Quote Originally Posted by ghost tracker View Post
    Some folks squeeze the grip SOOOO TIGHTLY as to negates most of the "sensitivity" in their trigger finger. Yet "riding the sear" is primarily a pro (competition) shooter's technique for shaving fractions-of-seconds off of their split-times. IMHO, it is (at best) an advanced pistolero's concern. Meaning there are a lot of basics that need to be practiced (...practiced, practiced) before a defensive shooter need concern themself with it.

    On the other hand, over-squeezing the grip is a MUCH more common (and less discussed) handgunner's issue. You need to allow your trigger finger to move freely & independently from the rest of the fingers on your dominate hand. If your forearm is rock-hand from your grip? That won't happen. So try this, don't grip the pistol with your forearms. Use your pectoral (chest) muscles to press your palms squarely toward one-another from either side of the grip. In a two-handed grip, it'll ideally control your pistol. Now, with a relaxed forearm (on your dominate hand) you'll be AMAZED at the control & "feel" you'll now discover in your trigger finger. Hits will become easier & faster.
    G T addresses some things that a lot of pistol shooters are guilty of and even brag about while not understanding what they do. When I asked J. Michael Plaxco how hard to grip a gun he shook my hand in a near effeminate grip and said "this hard". Kinda hard to believe but a lot of peeps over grip. On the edge of a conversation between Chip McCormick and Steve Nastoff I overheard them talking about using their week hand to provide most of the grip support while allowing their strong hand to provide minor grip and allow proper handling of the trigger.

    J.M. Plaxco's advice for proper trigger operation negates the need to feel/hear trigger reset. Prep the trigger - meaning place your finger on the trigger and take out any slack. Then squeeze/press (not pull) the trigger. Release the trigger. Then repeat the sequence as needed. So much simpler than all this current nonsense about resetting and it works with all trigger types and it's completely fast enough once you learn the sequence.

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    I did a significant amount of shooting including competitions for close to 20 years and never had any idea there was such a thing as trigger reset until about a year ago. I never needed to know and I still don't. I am very accurate and fast enough "for my age bracket". That does not mean you shouldn't learn your trigger reset point. It does mean you shouldn't worry about it NOW.

    It is possible that I actually was using the trigger reset point, especially in competition, without even being aware of it. It's pretty hard to do a REALLY FAST double tap if you let the trigger really all the way out. But I do not know.
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    Senior Member Array LeanHard's Avatar
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    Ideally you only want to let the trigger to travel to reset. You gain nothing from bringing the trigger all the way out and taking back up the slop. If your a new shooter this isn't that critical, but once you start mastering the basics and want to try quick follow-up shots it will show it's worth to have good reset control. Less time pulling the trigger means faster follow ups along with less movement to throw your sights off.

    In a nut shell you fire and while the gun is coming back down on target you are already resetting the trigger so by the time the front sight settles back on the target your already at the wall of the trigger to pull again. You only shoot as fast as you can control the front sight. I'm not a expert, that's just my opinion.
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    Member Array bpurdy0's Avatar
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    Most guns have a trigger reset that you can feel as well as hear. You might also want to try using electronic hearing protection as it will protect your ears from loud noised while letting you hear things that you wouldn't normally hear with regular hearing protection. Also take the time to find the reset poi t at home. To do this, verify the gun is unloaded, pull the slide back and release, pull the trigger, keep the trigger depressed as you pull the slide back, release the slide and slowly release the trigger until it clicks.

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