Best gun for a dirty job - Page 2

Best gun for a dirty job

This is a discussion on Best gun for a dirty job within the Defensive Carry Guns forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; A revolver IS NOT what you want in that type environment! I would second a Glock or M&P go with whichever suits you best. IMO, ...

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Thread: Best gun for a dirty job

  1. #16
    VIP Member Array 5lima30ret's Avatar
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    A revolver IS NOT what you want in that type environment! I would second a Glock or M&P go with whichever suits you best. IMO, they are both about equal in the reliability in a dirty corrosive environment. Good luck!
    Retired Police Lieutenant, Former UH-1N Huey & MH-53 Pave Low Gunner, Retired USAF Reserve, Glock Armorer, AL Retired LEO CPP, NRA Certified Pistol Instructor, LEOSA Qualified, Active FOP Executive Board Member

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  2. #17
    Member Array ddrew's Avatar
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    How are you carrying it?

  3. #18
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    I AM WITH @OldChap . You need a holster that will cover the gun. Regardless of the gun you might buy there is no guarantee that foreign matter will not foul it. Sounds like your work calls shielding the gun from foreign matter. You might consider a belt pouch that zips closed. I think DeSantis makes them.
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  5. #19
    Senior Member Array johndp1911's Avatar
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    I keep waiting for my memo: once you pay 700-800+ for a handgun you have to jump on the Glock hating band wagon. This thread shows them to be more reliable than the more expensive Kimber and you don't have to carry oil and a microfiber rag in an accessory holster to keep it looking pretty.
    I wouldn't think twice about going with a Glock, OP

  6. #20
    Distinguished Member Array MB53's Avatar
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    As said, get a GLock.

  7. #21
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    Ak 47. Done. Your welcome.
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  8. #22
    Member Array wondering's Avatar
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    My first thought seeing the thread title was a Glock or an SP101. But after seeing that debris actually prevented the hammer from dropping, I would be hesitant to carry anything with a hammer or as many openings into the action that a revolver has. Though to be fair if the SP101 fails, you can beat the perp to with it.

    I would suggest a Glock as well, for all the above reasons and one more consideration, the Glock mags are enclosed in plastic and that keeps debris from entering the mags through the mag release holes. I've had pocket lint jam up a magazine follower which would have made my pistol a 2-shot wonder....if I needed a reload.

    Personally, I wouldn't carry a Kimber auto even if I worked in a sterile clean room....but that's just me.

  9. #23
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    I have not carried my Glocks in many years, but I would strongly suggest a Glock.
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  10. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by subhuman View Post
    lets not be mistreating the HK at work, beat up the Glock lol
    But if you carried a Mark 23, you could multi task with it, like using it to prop up a diesel engine or as a part of a hoist or jack or something.

  11. #25
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    In an earlier post above I suggested a belt pouch holster as a reliable and protective solution. Just decided to see if there is an ideal product and found this video from Craft Holsters. There is an embedded video showing the holster and how it works below. It is down near the bottom of the page. I am going to order one for my PPS M2 just for the occasion when I might need it. It ia lot cheaper than buying another gun.

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  12. #26
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    Just gotta ask: Do we really know that the revolver doesn't work and work well in dirty environments, or are we hypothesizing that it won't based on appearances, a superficial assessment of its mechanical design, or what is read in firearms forums?

    I'm "livin' the dream" yet, continuing to carry this same ol' revolver when the going gets truly tough. Since 1975 it's been carried afield in open top holsters, for hunting, fishing, hiking, and chores. It's lived under clean and not-so-clean vehicle seats for hours at a time on road trips. It's been deposited on dusty window ledges of deer stands or else left lying on the floor within reach, in bottoms of boats, canoes, and duck blinds, on gravel bars and in mud, in gritty waders pockets, been in the rain, been completely submerged in the lake on more than one occasion, been bled on, had snow, sand, sawdust, dirt, weed seeds, leaves, grass, twigs in the holster with it, Whether sawing up pickup loads of firewood, shoveling out pickup loads of road base, mowing high weeds and light brush, plowing or grading roads with a tractor, and more recently it suffered the indignity of being forgotten and subsequently tossed off the roof of the car onto asphalt pavement at 40 mph. This most recent photograph of it was taken after that mishap.



    Its long time holster companion, now completely worn out and replaced, bears mute testimony to the use to which the revolver's been subjected.


    The revolver's been a test bed, shooting quantities of experimental handloading concoctions that have "taken a walk on the wild side" by today's standards. It yet remains in time (only just).

    It's been gritty and very grimy, from extreme shooting of mass quantities of ammunition ("campaign firing" we used to call it) use or from deposits of foreign materials of various kinds. It isn't uncommon for it to be called on to work while gunked up, to lay a critter low or administer a coup de grâce. I'm still waiting for its first hiccup, bobble, or failure from a lifetime of heavy use. I haven't experienced it ... yet.

    And, it's not the only revolver around here that has been subjected to hard use.

    Of course this post is all anecdotal, but it's personal observation. Not too many lawmen or otherwise "operators" have ever subjected a handgun to the heavy shooting use and outright abuse that this revolver's successfully sustained. I ain't buying into the notion that the revolver is the ineffective weak sister of the handgun world.


    Sometimes auto pistol users become a bit over smug ... bleats the old geezer clinging to old ways.
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  13. #27
    Member Array m5215's Avatar
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    For very dirty environments I would want an HK USP9 or a SIG P226.
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  14. #28
    Senior Member Array KILTED COWBOY's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bmcgilvray View Post
    Just gotta ask: Do we really know that the revolver doesn't work and work well in dirty environments, or are we hypothesizing that it won't based on appearances, a superficial assessment of its mechanical design, or what is read in firearms forums?

    I'm "livin' the dream" yet, continuing to carry this same ol' revolver when the going gets truly tough. Since 1975 it's been carried afield in open top holsters, for hunting, fishing, hiking, and chores. It's lived under clean and not-so-clean vehicle seats for hours at a time on road trips. It's been deposited on dusty window ledges of deer stands or else left lying on the floor within reach, in bottoms of boats, canoes, and duck blinds, on gravel bars and in mud, in gritty waders pockets, been in the rain, been completely submerged in the lake on more than one occasion, been bled on, had snow, sand, sawdust, dirt, weed seeds, leaves, grass, twigs in the holster with it, Whether sawing up pickup loads of firewood, shoveling out pickup loads of road base, mowing high weeds and light brush, plowing or grading roads with a tractor, and more recently it suffered the indignity of being forgotten and subsequently tossed off the roof of the car onto asphalt pavement at 40 mph. This most recent photograph of it was taken after that mishap.



    Its long time holster companion, now completely worn out and replaced, bears mute testimony to the use to which the revolver's been subjected.


    The revolver's been a test bed, shooting quantities of experimental handloading concoctions that have "taken a walk on the wild side" by today's standards. It yet remains in time (only just).

    It's been gritty and very grimy, from extreme shooting of mass quantities of ammunition ("campaign firing" we used to call it) use or from deposits of foreign materials of various kinds. It isn't uncommon for it to be called on to work while gunked up, to lay a critter low or administer a coup de grâce. I'm still waiting for its first hiccup, bobble, or failure from a lifetime of heavy use. I haven't experienced it ... yet.

    And, it's not the only revolver around here that has been subjected to hard use.

    Of course this post is all anecdotal, but it's personal observation. Not too many lawmen or otherwise "operators" have ever subjected a handgun to the heavy shooting use and outright abuse that this revolver's successfully sustained. I ain't buying into the notion that the revolver is the ineffective weak sister of the handgun world.


    Sometimes auto pistol users become a bit over smug ... bleats the old geezer clinging to old ways.
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  15. #29
    Member Array Tennessee Jed's Avatar
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    For carrying in really harsh environments, I sometimes take into consideration how easy or hard it is for me to completely disassemble the gun, just in case I need to go deep to remove debris or dry something out.

    I one time dropped an S&W 642 into water, immediately picked it up, cleaned it as best I could without taking off the sideplate and drying out the innards, only to find rust there a few weeks later. It was a learning experience. That was when I decided I needed to learn how to disassemble and re-assemble an S&W revolver.

    For me, there's nothing easier to completely disassemble all the way down to pins and springs than a Glock. 1911's aren't bad once you learn the proper sequence.

    That said, personally, if carrying one of my wheelguns means that I need to get more comfortable with sometimes completely disassembling it to remove small debris or dry something out, then so be it.
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  16. #30
    Member Array m5215's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tennessee Jed View Post
    For carrying in really harsh environments, I sometimes take into consideration how easy or hard it is for me to completely disassemble the gun, just in case I need to go deep to remove debris or dry something out.

    I one time dropped an S&W 642 into water, immediately picked it up, cleaned it as best I could without taking off the sideplate and drying out the innards, only to find rust there a few weeks later. It was a learning experience. That was when I decided I needed to learn how to disassemble and re-assemble an S&W revolver.

    For me, there's nothing easier to completely disassemble all the way down to pins and springs than a Glock. 1911's aren't bad once you learn the proper sequence.

    That said, personally, if carrying one of my wheelguns means that I need to get more comfortable with sometimes completely disassembling it to remove small debris or dry something out, then so be it.
    If you get a firearm wet especially if the inner parts get wet, get as much water out as possible and then spray it down with WD-40 as soon as possible as it is specifically designed for water displacement (WD). I have never had any of my firearms get wet but I have heard from others that WD-40 will help remove any remaining water contamination and prevent rust from setting in.
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