Striker control device for Glock

Striker control device for Glock

This is a discussion on Striker control device for Glock within the Defensive Carry Guns forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; This item has been around for awhile, but this is the first video I've seen on it (not that I was looking for one before). ...

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Thread: Striker control device for Glock

  1. #1
    VIP Member Array G26Raven's Avatar
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    Striker control device for Glock

    This item has been around for awhile, but this is the first video I've seen on it (not that I was looking for one before). I think this is a very clever addition for a Glock and if I was carrying a Glock regularly, I would have one of these.

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    flh
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    Interesting butttt ...
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Striker control device for Glock-img_1955.jpg  




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    Member Array Spotsticker's Avatar
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    My standard comment. "Perfection ruined".
    If it is not for you there are many other fine pistols with a "safety".
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    VIP Member Array matthew03's Avatar
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    I have a customer who trains very hard with all the big name top tier trainers, his typical gun is a Sig P239, it's ingrained in him to thumb the hammer when he holsters; but when he runs glocks they are equipped with that device.

    Not something I care about or need, but he says they are 100% and don't effect anything mechanically in the gun if they were to fail.
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    VIP Member Array G26Raven's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by matthew03 View Post
    I have a customer who trains very hard with all the big name top tier trainers, his typical gun is a Sig P239, it's ingrained in him to thumb the hammer when he holsters; but when he runs glocks they are equipped with that device.

    Not something I care about or need, but he says they are 100% and don't effect anything mechanically in the gun if they were to fail.
    The only issue I could see is if the piece that blocks the striker broke, it seems like it could jam the pistol. Any mechanical device is subject to failure at some point, including original parts in the pistol itself.
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    All of my Glocks have the SCD installed on them, and they work great. Thumbing the "no hammer" has become ingrained with me, and I like that. This has nothing to do with your finger being your safety. It has to do with the possibility that something could snag the trigger while reholstering. Here's what Mas Ayoob had to say in a very recent thread over at GlockTalk:

    Strongly recommended. The SCD adds one more safety net to the holstering process. I'm a big fan. All upside, no downside that I can see.
    https://www.glocktalk.com/threads/ta...#post-27641944
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    Senior Member Array Psycho41's Avatar
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    Here's my take. The device requires that the user learn a new muscle memory behavior to put their thump on the back of the slide when holstering. But, a shooter should first ensure they learn the muscle memory/behavior to keep their finger off the trigger when holstering. So, in essence, they need to learn a second behavior to counteract the possibility of disregarding the first. If someone forgets the first (most important behavior), what's the chance they are going to remember the second? I'm curious if a person might not give trigger control the level of respect it deserves because they are putting more reliance on thumbing the slide. While the primary purpose of this device is for holstering, trigger control is important for all aspects of handing a firearm.

    If someone already has that muscle memory/behavior then I can see the usefulness. In any case it is an option. If someone feels it necessary, great. If not, they don't need to use it.
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    VIP Member Array G26Raven's Avatar
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    Psycho41, there are some people here, like myself, who carry DA/SA pistols. I am sure that most of them, like me, put their finger on the hammer when they holster. It's really not a difficult thing to learn how to do.
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    Nix
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    I'm curious about these SCDs. I find that I become 'hyperaware' when reholstering a Glock because that does seem to be a transition where accidents do occur. Having said that, I've never had an issue with a Glock firing either practicing dry or loaded.

    I guess the price tag has kept me in the 'curious' group and not the 'hey, I need that' group. Otherwise, I'd give one a try as it doesn't seem to hurt.
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    VIP Member Array OldChap's Avatar
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    I've carried a Glock for, conservatively, more than 55,000 hours, which includes thousands of re-holstering operations. I've never felt the need for a safety.

    My safety isn't my finger, it's my brain.

    Those who feel they need one, should certainly get one.
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    VIP Member Array Havok's Avatar
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    I still say this just creates a problem where there isnít one. I guess we live in a time where people shoot themselves and blame their holster or gun though.
    We get the government we deserve.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Psycho41
    But, a shooter should first ensure they learn the muscle memory/behavior to keep their finger off the trigger when holstering. So, in essence, they need to learn a second behavior to counteract the possibility of disregarding the first. If someone forgets the first (most important behavior), what's the chance they are going to remember the second? I'm curious if a person might not give trigger control the level of respect it deserves because they are putting more reliance on thumbing the slide.
    Given that I've yet to see a holster that can fit your finger in it along with the gun, I'd be willing to bet that many, if not most striker holstering discharges are caused not by lack of trigger discipline, but by something (shirttail, drawstring, etc.) snagging the trigger on the way into the holster.

    In my case, I'm 66 and about 10-15 pounds heavier than I'd like to be. I carry IWB at 2:30, and when I holster my pistol, the holster is pressed against my body, and it's very difficult to look the gun all the way in. The SCD allows me to thumb the slide and slowly holster the weapon, and if the trigger starts to move, I'll know it immediately. I do a lot of my range practice from the holster, so this is very important to me.

    I don't carry AIWB, but if I did, there's no way I'd carry a Glock without the SCD, no matter how thin I was. There's just too much at stake.

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    Member Array BBMW's Avatar
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    That thinking has caused a lot of negligent discharges. They call it "Glock leg" for a reason.

    My thinking goes past something like this device, all the way to wanting manual safeties on carry guns.

    Quote Originally Posted by flh View Post
    Interesting butttt ...
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  15. #14
    VIP Member Array matthew03's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Psycho41 View Post
    Here's my take. The device requires that the user learn a new muscle memory behavior to put their thump on the back of the slide when holstering. But, a shooter should first ensure they learn the muscle memory/behavior to keep their finger off the trigger when holstering. So, in essence, they need to learn a second behavior to counteract the possibility of disregarding the first. If someone forgets the first (most important behavior), what's the chance they are going to remember the second? I'm curious if a person might not give trigger control the level of respect it deserves because they are putting more reliance on thumbing the slide. While the primary purpose of this device is for holstering, trigger control is important for all aspects of handing a firearm.

    If someone already has that muscle memory/behavior then I can see the usefulness. In any case it is an option. If someone feels it necessary, great. If not, they don't need to use it.
    True, but thumb on back of slide, riding the hammer is old school. A whole bunch of trained people have that ingrained already. My thumb goes on the back of the slide when holstering a striker gun.
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    VIP Member Array Havok's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BBMW View Post
    That thinking has caused a lot of negligent discharges. They call it "Glock leg" for a reason.

    My thinking goes past something like this device, all the way to wanting manual safeties on carry guns.
    Probably called Glock leg because before Glocks people actually took responsibility for their actions.
    G26Raven, flh and OldChap like this.
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