How do you become comfortable with a striker for a CCW? - Page 2

How do you become comfortable with a striker for a CCW?

This is a discussion on How do you become comfortable with a striker for a CCW? within the Defensive Carry Guns forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Originally Posted by OldChap Welcome to DC. Learn to shoot properly...always recite the 4 rules of gun safety in your head...forget about hammers, strikers and ...

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Thread: How do you become comfortable with a striker for a CCW?

  1. #16
    VIP Member Array 5lima30ret's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldChap View Post
    Welcome to DC.

    Learn to shoot properly...always recite the 4 rules of gun safety in your head...forget about hammers, strikers and other such distractions.

    I forgot: Always remember...there is no trophy for the one who re-holsters the fastest.
    ^^^THIS!^^^
    Retired Police Lieutenant, Former UH-1N Huey & MH-53 Pave Low Gunner, Retired USAF Reserve, Glock Armorer, AL Retired LEO CPP, NRA Certified Pistol Instructor, LEOSA Qualified, Active FOP Executive Board Member

    "I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me" Phil 4:13

  2. #17
    Member Array Cypher's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chemcal View Post
    How do you become comfortable with a striker for a CCW?
    Carry it

  3. #18
    Member Array SunTsu's Avatar
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    I don't feel comfortable shooting a gun with a safety. The trigger is covered and can not accidentally fire. The Safety on the other hand, that is generally not covered, and I have had it flip in the holster.

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  5. #19
    VIP Member Array OldVet's Avatar
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    Back in 2009 when I decided to start carrying, I had my concerns also. I read up on and thought long and hard about striker-fired handguns before deciding to buy a Glock 30. With 10 years of carrying and shooting a striker-fired gun, I have no idea what my concerns were. While my preferred carry gun is a DA/SA firearm, I have no qualms with striker guns and still carry one to this day.

    In other words--get over it. It's a gun and is supposed to fire when the trigger is pulled. It's not the gun that NDs, it's the gun handler.
    Retired USAF E-8. Curmudgeon on the loose.
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  6. #20
    Senior Member Array entertainment72's Avatar
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    get one with a safety. On the rare occassion I carry my SR9c I engage the safety to holster it and then flick it off once securely in the rig.
    drmordo and Workaholic like this.

  7. #21
    Senior Member Array lee n. field's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chemcal View Post
    Hi All

    Most strikers I can shoot more accurately than TDA, DAO, or LEM. However, in over 15 years of CC, I've never carried one. The reason is fear of A/N discharge. I practice, but tight groups come much easier with aforementioned guns I don't carry. Any one been there and have good advise?
    How I got comfortable with Glock is
    1. taking it apart and figuring out how it worked. It's not "going off by itself". The striker doesn't have sufficient spring pressure (I don't think) to touch off a primer if it should slip off the sear surface, and it would have to batter its way through a steel pin (the striker block) even if it did.
    2. grip mods to suit me.
    3. Installing a striker control device backplate, to make holstering safe(r).


    It's partly a psychological thing. I get that. What I worry about "brain fart" NDs. Over familiarity and a moment's inattention and "BOOM!". Any bit of technology that helps head that off is a good thing. The "striker control device" backplate tipped me over to trusting the Glock and occasionally carrying it. The much maligned grip safety of the XD/XDM/XDS get you a similar level of safety, through a slightly different path.

    "Striker vs. hammer" really doesn't matter.

  8. #22
    VIP Member Array LimaCharlie's Avatar
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    I am comfortable carrying a loaded striker-fired gun, I just don't like them.
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  9. #23
    New Member Array djcomm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Havok View Post
    Like most other guns they will only fire if you pull the trigger(unless itís a 320). Itís Just a matter of getting used to it.
    If you want a 320 make sure it has been through the voluntary recall or purchased after the recall.

    As far as feeling comfortable, it comes with time. The danger is being too comfortable and losing respect for safety fundamentals. Finger off the trigger and careful slow holster/reholster.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G935A using Tapatalk

  10. #24
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    Training. 99% of my shooting from a holster is at home with laserlyte trainers. Rules at the ranges I have access to do not allow shooting from a holster, engaging multiple targets or moving while shooting. So I do that at home and riddle various objects around the house with red dot hits and reloads/malfunction drills.

    Also, my first handgun was a DA revolver, then a striker. Not that big of a change. What threw me off was when I got a DA/SA Beretta. The hair-trigger second shot is jarring.
    I know little on the subject so I'll speak at length.

    If you have an excuse for failure, you will.

  11. #25
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    At close distance front sight on point of aim. then pull trigger three times. No magic required, Hammer or striker means nothing. Rapid response means everything. Forget the technicalities, Kill the enemy.

  12. #26
    Distinguished Member Array dennis40x's Avatar
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    I have never had a negative discharge thus handling problem with Gen3 Glocks or Gen1 S&W MP series pistols. If you are competent in handling procedures there shouldn't be a problem if not use a different pistol operating system.

  13. #27
    Distinguished Member Array SOS24's Avatar
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    There are several things that I do, many of which have already been mentioned, to give me sufficient comfort to carry a striker fired carry
    - training and practice
    - a good kydex holster that completely covers the trigger
    - usually I holster the gun then put it on my belt
    - when holstering, ensure nothing is inside the holster and sight gun into holster
    - Even with all of the above, the only striker fired gun I carry is a PPS M2 because of the striker cocking indicator, which allows my to know if the trigger is moved while holstering by placing my thumb on the slide plate.

  14. #28
    Member Array Big Western's Avatar
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    It all comes down to establishing your confidence with a striker pistol; Formal training, then solo practicing what you've learned, really helps. But it all comes down to being vigilant about gun safety, using a rigid, quality kydex holster, and ALWAYS ensuring nothing is in your holster as you insert the pistol- not folded over leather, fabric, clothing, keys, or a burrito. If you can't see clearly into your holster, remove it, eyeball it, then reholster the pistol and reattach to your body.
    "If you're in a gunfight there's no such thing as enough ammo, and your gunfight will only last as long as your ammo." - Clint Smith

    "There are only two times you can carry too much ammo, when you're drowning or on fire."
    - Mike Hughes of Gunsite

  15. #29
    VIP Member Array ColoradoDiablo's Avatar
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    Keep your booger finger off the bang switch and all is well...

    But seriously...be deliberate and know what you are doing at all times when holstering, unholstering, and drawing. If you do that, you will be more than fine IMHO.
    U.S. Army, Retired (1986 to 2014)
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  16. #30
    Member Array Big Western's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SmoothJazz View Post
    Some striker fired guns do have relatively heavy trigger pull.
    Springfield XD series has a grip safety which can help avoid a ND while holstering the gun.
    Interesting... I would think most people reholster without altering their grip, so wouldn't that result in the XD grip safety being depressed while reholstering?
    Rabbit212 likes this.
    "If you're in a gunfight there's no such thing as enough ammo, and your gunfight will only last as long as your ammo." - Clint Smith

    "There are only two times you can carry too much ammo, when you're drowning or on fire."
    - Mike Hughes of Gunsite

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