Why don't people get more training?

Why don't people get more training?

This is a discussion on Why don't people get more training? within the Defensive Carry & Tactical Training forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; In your opinion, why does the average CCW holder typically not get more training than the legally required minimum training? Peace favor your sword, Kirk...

View Poll Results: Why don't people get more than legally min training?

Voters
54. You may not vote on this poll
  • Lazy

    1 1.85%
  • Think their existing skills are sufficient

    13 24.07%
  • Don't have enough time/too busy

    7 12.96%
  • Classes are too expensive

    8 14.81%
  • Don't know that more training is available

    0 0%
  • Don't know where to train

    0 0%
  • Don't know what instructor to trust for "good" training

    4 7.41%
  • other (explain in post)

    21 38.89%
Page 1 of 14 1 2 3 4 5 11 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 205
Like Tree588Likes

Thread: Why don't people get more training?

  1. #1
    Member Array lklawson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Dayton, OH
    Posts
    36

    Why don't people get more training?

    In your opinion, why does the average CCW holder typically not get more training than the legally required minimum training?

    Peace favor your sword,
    Kirk
    CG11 and flh like this.

  2. #2
    VIP Member
    Array Mike1956's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Marion county, Ohio
    Posts
    33,060
    Where indifference and ignorance meet--they don't know what they don't know, and they don't care.
    "Stop being dangerous, and you become edible." William Aprill

    Be careful what you put out there. The Universe is listening.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Array entertainment72's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Posts
    645
    I don't because training like the military or a cop is not necessary for me to defend myself.
    msgt/ret, G-man*, OD* and 8 others like this.

  4. Remove Advertisements
    DefensiveCarry.com
    Advertisements
     

  5. #4
    Ex Member Array CG11's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    NorthWestern Arizona
    Posts
    5,322
    I don't get more training because I have training and experience - and I recognize that this is a weak argument given how old and outdated that training is, but I bolster it with the fact that at almost 69 years old, with metal replacement parts, various health issues, and me being about as flexible as a 2X12, I doubt that training is going to be beneficial, or survivable, for me. When I have to get on the floor, it takes some time and help, a chair arm, etc, to regain my feet. Yes, I absolutely agree and recommend training beyond basics - if you are able to benefit from said training.
    OD*, AzQkr, OldChap and 12 others like this.

  6. #5
    flh
    flh is online now
    VIP Member Array flh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    New York...NOT ...Noo Yawk
    Posts
    2,070
    Welcome aboard,

    Very good first post ,
    OldChap likes this.



    If it is ever your misfortune to be attacked, alertness will have given you a little warning, decisiveness will have given you a proper course to pursue, and if that course is to counterattack, carry it out with everything you've got! Be indignant. Be angry. Be aggressive.

    Jeff Cooper

  7. #6
    flh
    flh is online now
    VIP Member Array flh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    New York...NOT ...Noo Yawk
    Posts
    2,070
    I beleave that it's like having a fire extinguisher , they have it but never expect to need it ....



    If it is ever your misfortune to be attacked, alertness will have given you a little warning, decisiveness will have given you a proper course to pursue, and if that course is to counterattack, carry it out with everything you've got! Be indignant. Be angry. Be aggressive.

    Jeff Cooper

  8. #7
    VIP Member Array LimaCharlie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Northwest Oregon
    Posts
    14,846
    Mindset is far more critical than all of the training possible. I have wealthy father and sons relatives who attend three or four nationally recognized training camps per year. In a critical situation, I would not want to be anywhere near them.
    OldVet, OldChap, AzQkr and 15 others like this.
    Second Amendment: The difference between politicians and rulers.
    US Navy - US Army, Retired
    NRA Benefactor Life Member

  9. #8
    VIP Member Array G-man*'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Central Kentucky
    Posts
    18,002
    It could simply be life priorities and interests.

    Look; you have to realize that the vast majority of people are not like the very minority group here who have guns and shooting in the forefront of our minds every day.

    For many there are many other interests that dictate where they spend their time and money. Hobbies such as hiking, fishing, antique collecting, riding horses, motorcycles and atv’s, or you name it, far outweigh the interest in topics of SD , or shooting guns in general.

    And probably for many that do have more than a passing interest in SD and shooting, there is relevance.
    Simply put, many do not see the relevance in what they need for their daily lives in the current and prevalent crop of shoot’em up schools designed for LE and military style situations.

    The gun culture has become an extremely puffed up and condescending group as a whole. Casting judgment on anyone that does not see things their way or share the zeal.
    " Blessed is that man, who when facing death, thinks only of his front sight.”
    -Jeff Cooper

    “ Looking around doesn’t cost you anything; and it’s a healthy habit”
    -Joe Foss

  10. #9
    VIP Member Array Chuck R.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    NE, KS
    Posts
    2,920
    I checked the "believe their skills are adequate" block.

    Based on the "odds" of a civilian being in an armed conflict, the vast majority are right.

    The last few years I've been taking a defensive class or 2 a year. I've literally got a binder full of certificates, spent thousands in tuition, more in ammo, gas etc. Far better trained now than when I was on active duty.

    But that's about to change as I'm leaning towards taking more competition based training. Bottom line for me is that the odds are getting longer (they were remote to begin with) that I'll be engaged in a lethal conflict whereas I know I'll be in a match in just a couple days. While classes are still fun and I enjoy learning new things I'm just going to re-focus some.

    That and the belief that the majority of individuals that have successfully used a firearm in self defense had no formal training.
    homo homini lupus est

  11. #10
    Ex Member Array AzQkr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    In the Superstitions
    Posts
    19,639
    Quote Originally Posted by entertainment72 View Post
    I don't because training like the military or a cop is not necessary for me to defend myself.
    What is necessary, if anything, for you to defend yourself? IYO?
    Secret Spuk and Bad Bob like this.

  12. #11
    Ex Member Array AzQkr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    In the Superstitions
    Posts
    19,639
    My training over the years has resulted in my staying upright and breathing. I know in one of the DGU's, without one very specific skill I was given which was used, I'd have not survived the encounter [ a 2 on 1 situation very up close and personal ]. Having spent upwards of 30K in training venues since 71, surviving that one incident was worth every penny spent prior on training.

    Better to have it and never need it than need it and not have it on tap to respond as effectively as possible. How many students have come through a course of fire thinking they were "good to go" who discovered they really didn't know what they thought they knew about surviving with a gun. There's shooting skills and then there's learning to stay alive with a handgun, the two are often confused as interchangeable, they are not.

  13. #12
    VIP Member Array OldVet's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    The Florida Twilight Zone
    Posts
    32,884
    I voted "Other" for a host of reasons, which Gman pretty much nailed right on the head.

    I, for one, never had much disposable income, and what I did have had far more usefulness elsewhere than running some firearm obstacle course. There was hunting, drinking, fishing, drinking, camping, drinking...so many different things that took priority. Furthermore, there were not that many courses available.

    I've watched videos of a few of the current courses, and frankly, now that I have the time and money to take one if I chose, the body would not hold up. Even a hour session at the local range shooting line is a serious strain that takes too much time to recover.

    It's all a matter of priorities, and most of us do not place what many of these courses offer very high on that list. There's nothing wrong with the training, but it's not necessary for many.
    Retired USAF E-8. Curmudgeon on the loose.
    Lighten up and enjoy life because:
    Paranoia strikes deep, into your life it will creep. It starts when you're always afraid... Buffalo Springfield - For What It's Worth

  14. #13
    VIP Member Array lionround's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Memphis
    Posts
    2,836
    Like CG11 said, if someone would come up with a training regimen geared toward those of us with arthritis, who walk with a cane and have trouble moving laterally as well as getting up off the floor, that might be useful. At 63, I don't need to be in a training session taught by some 30-something Marine or SF guy with a bunch of other 30 or 40-somethings running around on the range. I would be more likely to limp through the training and hold everybody else up.
    PPS1980, CG11, AzQkr and 8 others like this.
    Memphis -- No. 2 on the list of most crime ridden cities in America. Working on being No. 1 but we just can't catch Detroit.

    1950 Colt .38 Police Positive Special
    2013 SCCY 9mm CPX-2 Stainless Steel
    US Army 1973-1977, 95B

  15. #14
    VIP Member
    Array PPS1980's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Location
    The Free State of Georgia
    Posts
    2,240
    How many reasons do you need/want?

    - So MANY tacitard instructors out there that know less than nothing but are assertive, loud, and dress the part.
    - Been there, done that. Shot competitively for years. Practice at the range weekly. Been on both ends of a drawn weapon.
    - I'm not training to retake a building/town/compound. I'm training to put shots on target in <20yrds in a self-defense situation.
    - I'm not going to be carrying 3 weapons.
    - I don't own an 5.11 clothes.
    - My hair is no longer crew cut.
    __________________
    I prefer dangerous freedom over peaceful slavery.
    - Thomas Jefferson 1787
    Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?
    NRA Life Member - Member GA Carry Organization

  16. #15
    Ex Member Array AzQkr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    In the Superstitions
    Posts
    19,639
    Quote Originally Posted by lionround View Post
    Like CG11 said, if someone would come up with a training regimen geared toward those of us with arthritis, who walk with a cane and have trouble moving laterally as well as getting up off the floor, that might be useful. At 63, I don't need to be in a training session taught by some 30-something Marine or SF guy with a bunch of other 30 or 40-somethings running around on the range. I would be more likely to limp through the training and hold everybody else up.
    In my first course offered in Tuscon, an older disabled gent came in from Wash. state with his cane. Used it throughout the two days of skills training. Sat out the moving and shooting portions for obvious reasons. He came with a laser on his gun, thinking he needed it. He took it off at the first break, he discovered it was a crutch, he didn't need a crutch, only his cane to be able to perform the skills like every other younger person there.

    I've held a course for mobility challenged in Florida. They learned new skills they could put to use immediately in the real world, many discovering they were far more capable than they thought they were, once challenged. Of course, the course was adapted to their particular ailments/mobility issues. One lady who showed up with her husband [ from Va. ] in a wheelchair discovered she could put one of the skills she's learned that weekend to very effective use after she was knocked on her back in her wheelchair. The confidence she gained in her ability to respond effectively from the chair was well worth the price of admission and costs assoc. with coming all that way to Fla.

Page 1 of 14 1 2 3 4 5 11 ... LastLast

Sponsored Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •