Different Type of Class: Competition Handgun (Kinda Long)

Different Type of Class: Competition Handgun (Kinda Long)

This is a discussion on Different Type of Class: Competition Handgun (Kinda Long) within the Defensive Carry & Tactical Training forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; In the course of my lifetime I've taken roughly 14 or so defensive oriented shooting classes (shotgun, carbine, handgun, low-light, & injured Shooter) in addition ...

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Thread: Different Type of Class: Competition Handgun (Kinda Long)

  1. #1
    VIP Member Array Chuck R.'s Avatar
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    Different Type of Class: Competition Handgun (Kinda Long)

    In the course of my lifetime I've taken roughly 14 or so defensive oriented shooting classes (shotgun, carbine, handgun, low-light, & injured Shooter) in addition to the 23 years of Army training and a LE academy. Past few years I've averaged a class or 2 a year, mostly because I enjoy taking classes and it lets me keep up with the new stuff. I also compete in IDPA and 3Gun.

    Last year after finishing another couple classes I slowly came to the realization that the odds of me ever making use of this training was slim, and due to age, lifestyle etc. getting slimmer. Odds of being engaged in an active gun fight, about 0%, odds of shooting a match next month (actually tomorrow night) 100%. So I decided to re-orient my time/disposable income to something I would make use of.

    This past SAT I took Merle Edington's Competitive Performance - Phase 1 Class at Mill Creek Rifle Club in Desoto, KS. Hie Bios on the site, BLUF: Special Ops background, founding member of AMU competition team, Grand Master in a couple disciplines, won a bunch of chit. He's also a nice guy and pretty funny, instructs very well (which is really the important stuff).

    https://shootingsolutionsllc.com/


    his is a group pistol instruction class of 8-12 students and approximately 8 hours in length.
    The class is focused on practical shooting fundamentals that will help improve competitive performance. We will work through the primary aspects of Fundamentals and their application in the competitive shooting world. Along with the work on each of the topics below, we will spend time discussing the evolution of the fundamental, and why the correct application is so important to the competitive shooter.
    Topics covered in this class were: freestyle shooting platform, definition of sight picture/alignment and it practical use (or not!), ergonomics of gun fit, placement of equipment, ammunition choice, steel target engagement, and the need for speed vs accuracy. Class was primarily geared towards USPSA shooting, so some of the equipment, engagements, reloads etc. are not aligned with IDPA rules, but the meat of the class was practical for IDPA.

    Class lasted about 8hrs till the rain came in, I went through just over 600 rds.

    Equipment used: CZ75 SA Accu-Shadow lite from the custom shop, my standard IDPA holster and mag carries, my normal match reloads of 147grn at power factor.

    This was different than defensive shooting, but really when you piece it together not that dramatically different. Similar concepts of "seeing what you need to see, to make the shot you need to make" (quote I've stolen from a previous instructor (Jabo Long) was apparent throughout the class. Stressing efficiency of movements (reloads, draw, footwork) was even more evident than in most of the tactical/defensive classes I've taken.

    Very, very, good instruction on recoil management and the 'extra' sight picture to reduce splits while maintaining accuracy. Some fantastic instruction on target transitions, especially wide transitions found in matches utilizing your knees to drive the upper torso.

    Stuff I had issues with:

    Reloads, I'm "OK" at reloads, but one issue this class identified (and we did a lot of reloads) was that I'm not reestablishing my grip very well after the reload. This results in some c & D hits (1s & 3s in IDPA speak) after reloading is complete. I got caught multiple times with an air-gap between my firing and support hand.

    Table pick-ups/starts, learned a new technique to do this, and I'm just not getting it. It's something I'm going to have to spend some time on.

    I shoot too fast, relying on a cadence or rythm rather than watching the sights. It's like I'm doing "hammers", but extending the distance past being acceptable for what should be 3 sight pictures. This causes me to drop points going from zero's to 1s on IDPA TGT, rather than staying on the sights. I shave a couple .01s or .001's on some tgts and on other's it's costing me 1.0s in points down, or worse 5.0 for popping a no shoot.

    So, overall a very worthwhile class for competition, and if you just want to shoot well and fast. One note about the students in this particular class that's different from other classes I've taken. Without an exception, these guys (12 total with one woman and 4 junior shooters) could shoot...there were no basic marksmanship issues. A couple of the juniors, were flat out awesome.

    So now like after every class I've taken I've got some stuff to work on.......
    homo homini lupus est

  2. #2
    Senior Member Array NETim's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck R. View Post
    In the course of my lifetime I've taken roughly 14 or so defensive oriented shooting classes (shotgun, carbine, handgun, low-light, & injured Shooter) in addition to the 23 years of Army training and a LE academy. Past few years I've averaged a class or 2 a year, mostly because I enjoy taking classes and it lets me keep up with the new stuff. I also compete in IDPA and 3Gun.

    Last year after finishing another couple classes I slowly came to the realization that the odds of me ever making use of this training was slim, and due to age, lifestyle etc. getting slimmer. Odds of being engaged in an active gun fight, about 0%, odds of shooting a match next month (actually tomorrow night) 100%. So I decided to re-orient my time/disposable income to something I would make use of.

    This past SAT I took Merle Edington's Competitive Performance - Phase 1 Class at Mill Creek Rifle Club in Desoto, KS. Hie Bios on the site, BLUF: Special Ops background, founding member of AMU competition team, Grand Master in a couple disciplines, won a bunch of chit. He's also a nice guy and pretty funny, instructs very well (which is really the important stuff).

    https://shootingsolutionsllc.com/




    Topics covered in this class were: freestyle shooting platform, definition of sight picture/alignment and it practical use (or not!), ergonomics of gun fit, placement of equipment, ammunition choice, steel target engagement, and the need for speed vs accuracy. Class was primarily geared towards USPSA shooting, so some of the equipment, engagements, reloads etc. are not aligned with IDPA rules, but the meat of the class was practical for IDPA.

    Class lasted about 8hrs till the rain came in, I went through just over 600 rds.

    Equipment used: CZ75 SA Accu-Shadow lite from the custom shop, my standard IDPA holster and mag carries, my normal match reloads of 147grn at power factor.

    This was different than defensive shooting, but really when you piece it together not that dramatically different. Similar concepts of "seeing what you need to see, to make the shot you need to make" (quote I've stolen from a previous instructor (Jabo Long) was apparent throughout the class. Stressing efficiency of movements (reloads, draw, footwork) was even more evident than in most of the tactical/defensive classes I've taken.

    Very, very, good instruction on recoil management and the 'extra' sight picture to reduce splits while maintaining accuracy. Some fantastic instruction on target transitions, especially wide transitions found in matches utilizing your knees to drive the upper torso.

    Stuff I had issues with:

    Reloads, I'm "OK" at reloads, but one issue this class identified (and we did a lot of reloads) was that I'm not reestablishing my grip very well after the reload. This results in some c & D hits (1s & 3s in IDPA speak) after reloading is complete. I got caught multiple times with an air-gap between my firing and support hand.

    Table pick-ups/starts, learned a new technique to do this, and I'm just not getting it. It's something I'm going to have to spend some time on.

    I shoot too fast, relying on a cadence or rythm rather than watching the sights. It's like I'm doing "hammers", but extending the distance past being acceptable for what should be 3 sight pictures. This causes me to drop points going from zero's to 1s on IDPA TGT, rather than staying on the sights. I shave a couple .01s or .001's on some tgts and on other's it's costing me 1.0s in points down, or worse 5.0 for popping a no shoot.

    So, overall a very worthwhile class for competition, and if you just want to shoot well and fast. One note about the students in this particular class that's different from other classes I've taken. Without an exception, these guys (12 total with one woman and 4 junior shooters) could shoot...there were no basic marksmanship issues. A couple of the juniors, were flat out awesome.

    So now like after every class I've taken I've got some stuff to work on.......
    Thanks for the report!! This sounds like what I need. I'm stuck solidly in C Class. I do all kinds of dumb stuff on stages which naturally hurts my scores.

    I'm sorry I missed this class. :(
    Chuck R. likes this.
    Don't try to be fancy. Shoot for the center of mass. The world is full of decent people. Criminals we can do without. -- Jeff Cooper (19202006)

  3. #3
    VIP Member Array matthew03's Avatar
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    Great write up. Sounds like a worthwhile class to attend.

    It always amazes me how little participation the forum gives to training/class etc. compared to equipment/new guns.
    Chuck R., NETim and Bad Bob like this.
    Appalachian Concealment


    I don't train to fight some street urchin, I train to fight the evil version of myself, and that person scares me, because I know the time I put into my training on how to beat him.

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  5. #4
    VIP Member Array Chuck R.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NETim View Post
    Thanks for the report!! This sounds like what I need. I'm stuck solidly in C Class. I do all kinds of dumb stuff on stages which naturally hurts my scores.

    I'm sorry I missed this class. :(
    I'm in the exact same position. I'll place within the top 5, sometimes a few notches higher and it's always due to some stupid chit I did. It always a case of "what could have been IF I hadn't........ Merle had a good way of explaining that the difference between a GM and a Master class shooter was a percentage of consistency, the GMs are just more consistent on each and every stage, no bad stages.
    NETim and Bad Bob like this.
    homo homini lupus est

  6. #5
    VIP Member Array Chuck R.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by matthew03 View Post
    Great write up. Sounds like a worthwhile class to attend.

    It always amazes me how little participation the forum gives to training/class etc. compared to equipment/new guns.
    New guns are cool, paying for knowledge not so much. It's just human nature.
    NETim, matthew03 and Bad Bob like this.
    homo homini lupus est

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