Training: Good or bad? - Page 3

Training: Good or bad?

This is a discussion on Training: Good or bad? within the Defensive Carry & Tactical Training forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; I believe practice is important too, like drawing from concealment & getting off the X, Shooting on the move ; ) H/D...

View Poll Results: Do you think training is good or bad?

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  • I carry concealed an I am in favor of firearms training.

    82 96.47%
  • I carry concealed and I am against firearms training

    0 0%
  • I carry openly and I am in favor of firearms training.

    2 2.35%
  • I carry openly and I am against firearms training.

    1 1.18%
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Thread: Training: Good or bad?

  1. #31
    VIP Member Array hogdaddy's Avatar
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    I believe practice is important too, like drawing from concealment & getting off the X, Shooting on the move ; )
    H/D
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  2. #32
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    I lost all confidence in NRA training after the fiasco with the mall ninja training asserted to be state of the art under Carry Guard. Again, most of the training I see offered is pure bs.
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  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by PPS1980 View Post
    I lost all confidence in NRA training after the fiasco with the mall ninja training asserted to be state of the art under Carry Guard. Again, most of the training I see offered is pure bs.
    Some of the best training I've had was under the auspices of the NRA. So was the absolute worst. As with many things, it depends.
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  5. #34
    Member Array Cypher's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hogdaddy View Post
    I believe practice is important too, like drawing from concealment & getting off the X, Shooting on the move ; )
    H/D
    I've told this story before, I think I've even told it here.

    I used to have a job where I spent my nights out in rural El Paso County checking electrical substations. At some of the substations the fence was a mile around and I would walk around those fences and I will practice four-point draws from a Safariland holster all night long. I didn't practice doing them fast. I didn't try for quickdraws. I just did it over and over and over and over and over again. I'll bet you I drew that gun five or six hundred times every night.

    A couple of months later I was getting ready to go to work one night and somebody started shooting at the end of my parking lot. I took cover and looked around to assess what was going on. That's when I realized that I had drawn my gun without even thinking about it.

  6. #35
    VIP Member Array hogdaddy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cypher View Post
    I've told this story before, I think I've even told it here.

    I used to have a job where I spent my nights out in rural El Paso County checking electrical substations. At some of the substations the fence was a mile around and I would walk around those fences and I will practice four-point draws from a Safariland holster all night long. I didn't practice doing them fast. I didn't try for quickdraws. I just did it over and over and over and over and over again. I'll bet you I drew that gun five or six hundred times every night.

    A couple of months later I was getting ready to go to work one night and somebody started shooting at the end of my parking lot. I took cover and looked around to assess what was going on. That's when I realized that I had drawn my gun without even thinking about it.
    That's a good thing "Muscle memory" Good to know you do it without hesitation ; )
    H/D
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  7. #36
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    I'm in the USCCA and watch some of their training videos and they are some pretty good articles in the magazine. I'd like to do a hands on class once a year if there was one local and didn't cost 5X my DCG.

    Just curious - does anyone shoot IDPA as a way to keep sharp on shooting skills/positional/gun handling?
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  8. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Terry 2.0 View Post
    I'm in the USCCA and watch some of their training videos and they are some pretty good articles in the magazine. I'd like to do a hands on class once a year if there was one local and didn't cost 5X my DCG.

    Just curious - does anyone shoot IDPA as a way to keep sharp on shooting skills/positional/gun handling?
    IDPA and USPSA are both very good at keeping up on and improving your skills.

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  9. #38
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    I've taken a lot of training because I started with zero firearms experience. I am a very slow learner, so to get to where I wanted to be I took courses in handgun, carbine, precision rifle, and shotgun. I will never be as good a shot as I would like to be, but I work at it regularly.

    I taught scuba diving and trained scuba instructors for many years. I designed courses and wrote textbooks on the subject. If there is one thing I learned from someone who was probably the best teacher I ever met, it's that "Practice doesn't make perfect. Only perfect practice makes perfect."

    You can practice with your weapons as much as you want, but if you practice it wrong and there is not someone there to critique you and tell you what you are doing wrong, you are not going to improve (and you might just be unsafe as well).

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  10. #39
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    The poll is good. The choices are fine. If someone wants to elaborate on their preferred training, the comments section seems to be supporting that. Otherwise the poll would have 1,000+ choices. The results would be so diluted, they would be useless.

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  11. #40
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    As long as the training is voluntary, and not mandatory, I'm in favor of it.

  12. #41
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    Training is good. Practice is good. Situational awareness is good. I still say that mindset is about 80% to 90% of survival. I have seen people excel in all aspects of training fail miserably under duress. I have seen people who barely made it through training perform admirably under duress.
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  13. #42
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    Obviously training is good. Not only is it good I would say it is vital. A boxer trains because he knows one day a fight is coming. As the old saying goes prior planning prevents piss poor performance. If you carry you should know how to use it. If you donít ever plan on using it then that is the only valid excuse I could see for not training. But if you donít ever plan on using it then why do you even carry?


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  14. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Terry 2.0 View Post
    Just curious - does anyone shoot IDPA as a way to keep sharp on shooting skills/positional/gun handling?
    Yeah, I shoot IDPA whenever I can. My bil started me in it 5 yrs ago, Iíd been carrying 15 yrs with only rudimentary training. Within 3 matches I realized benefits of trigger time, operating under pressure, shooting on the move and from cover, learning quick reloads, and making shots count. Over time I see these perishable skills ebb and grow in kind with my frequency of participation.

    For most of you these skills seem basic but shooting matches, for me, emphasizes them and highlights the ones Iím most needing to improve.
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  15. #44
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    So yes, I carry concealed and am in favor of voluntary training. The two-day training I had last month was way more valuable to me because Iíve been shooting awhile. As a boy I went through NRA safety and rifle training, and last year had IDPA safety officer training.

    Training for us civvies is like a whole lot of other services, Iím sure. From what I hear thereís questionable quality in some offerings. I checked with friends before committing to two days of training provided by Glock. Signed up for last October but Lyme disease kicked my butt and forced me to postpone until later. Glock was great about letting me reschedule to a later date.

    The Glock training class consisted of two eight-hour days of well-organized instruction and drills, dry fire plus 950 rounds. We practiced tap rack, without mags, over and over until my support hand was tired of hitting the grip butt. Without a flared magwell the mag opening is sharp! Then we practiced with mags with dummy rounds - trigger pull, tap the mag, rack the slide, trigger pull, tap the mag, over and over until it was almost automatic.

    Then we mixed live rounds with dummy rounds. Like I said, it was almost automatic - I sent a round downrange. The next one didnít fire. I immediately dropped the mag and was grabbing a fresh one. What?!! Okay, kinda embarrassing, especially after all thatís practice we JUST did on tap rack.

    The real point to this is, he showed a skill. He had us execute it dry whenever appropriate. Then we did it hot. And did it over and over again while he walked behind all nine of us, one by one, critiquing and correcting. Really well done. Nice too that the instructor is very skilled with his handgun. Every time he showed us a skill, he nailed it. And his accuracy and speed were better than our best shooter on the skills test at the end of the second day.

    I look fwd to my next training.
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  16. #45
    VIP Member Array wmhawth's Avatar
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    Training: Good or bad?
    Is this a trick question?

    Basic training for the inexperienced and continuous practice for the older more experienced can't be bad. As a practical matter I question how much money the average citizen needs to invest in high profile trainers but surely no good training is ever wasted.

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