Zero distance for a pistol caliber caribine?

Zero distance for a pistol caliber caribine?

This is a discussion on Zero distance for a pistol caliber caribine? within the Defensive Rifles & Shotgun Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; Where do you zero your PCC? I have a Scorpion Evo with a chopped down barrel, like 4.5” with a tri-lug. What distance do you ...

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Thread: Zero distance for a pistol caliber caribine?

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    VIP Member Array Chuck808's Avatar
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    Zero distance for a pistol caliber caribine?

    Where do you zero your PCC? I have a Scorpion Evo with a chopped down barrel, like 4.5” with a tri-lug. What distance do you zero at? I run a RMR on it, and typically shoot 147gr ammo since I shoot it suppressed.

    25 yards? 50? 100? What gives a good solid relatively flat trajectory out to 100 yards or so?

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    50 yards for my Kriss Super V, in .45 acp. 50 yards also, for the two AR pistols in 5.56. Red Dots on the Kriss & the 10.5" barreled pistol. Iron sights only on the 7.5" AR
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    VIP Member Array G-man*'s Avatar
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    A 25 yard zero is fine out to 100 yards. At that point the projectile will cross, and rise above the line of sight until it begins its downward trajectory. At 100 yards it should be close enough.
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    Senior Member Array DownInTheDark's Avatar
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    As I sit bored waiting at a tire store I messed around with Hornadys ballistic calculator. Zeroing in a projectile going 1200 fps this is what I came up with. 135 gr bullet, 1.5 scope height, bc .35.

    50 yard zero at 100 yards: -5.1 inches.
    100 yard zero at 50 yards: +2.6 inches.
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    VIP Member Array Chuck R.'s Avatar
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    I zero mine; 16" 147s for 50 yds.

    Still on steel at 100 and at 150 I aim at the neck/shoulder line to hit COM. I agree that a 25Y should keep you on ok at 100.
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    Determine your farthest shot you're reasonably going to take.

    Use a ballistic calculator with correct input on velocity, bullet weight. Run a 25/50/100 yrds zero formula and find the one that is the flattest trajectory. Make sure you input how far above the bore your rmr sits and plug that into the calculations, as it makes a difference which many forget to account for.
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    VIP Member Array OldChap's Avatar
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    I use 25 yards for the 9mm, but use 100 for the 5.56 and 300 Blackout pistols. They shoot quite a bit flatter. The 9mm will only be used at close ranges, so 25 is good.

    I've mentioned this a few times before, but this is an excellent ballistic calculator with more than you'll ever need:

    Strelok Pro. Ballistic calculator for Android

    Comes in all phone OS systems.
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    VIP Member Array G26Raven's Avatar
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    I zeroed my MPX at 25 yards. I consider it to be a short to "medium" (100 yards) range "weapon," err, I mean tool.
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    Rather than picking a single, "mostly likely" distance, I think a better approach is to estimate your closest distance, most likely encounter distance, and your furthest distance and plot those against your ammunition/firearm's ballistic trajectory.

    For example, here's the ballistic trajectory for a 223 Rem 70gr Berger VLD.

    1. Modify the presets as required to match your ammunition. Because I live at relatively high altitude, it does have an effect, albeit slight.

    2. Change the shooting angle to 0 deg.

    3. Change the Chart Range to the furthest distance you'd ever shoot that round in self defense. I cannot for the life of me envision a self-defense situation where I'd be shooting more than 300 yards, so I set it to that. Obviously, for handguns, it'll be 50 yards, 100 yards... Wherever you're comfortable.

    4. Reset the Zero Range (The range that a firearm is sighted at) to your most likely encounter distance. For me using a .223, that would be an urban combat situation of approximately 70 yards.

    5. Set the Wind Speed to 0 mph.

    6. Come up with a "most likely range." For me with this round, that might be 0 to 150 yards.

    7. Check your rise and drop distances to make sure that if you're aiming center body mass, you'll still hit it given your sight distance. For the chart to which I linked above, that's -1.5 inches on both sides (0 and 150 yards) of the 70 yard Zero Range.

    This tells me that if I aim center body mass anywhere between point blank range and 150 yards, at most my round will drop 1.5 inches.

    You can use this calculator for most rounds out there.
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    It really depends on your particular load, and your "point blank range" requirements.

    Using a decent ballistics calculator like the one linked below, for your 147 gr load if you zero at 25 yds your POI will be within 2" out to 80 yds. If you're just ringing steel plates you can probably extend that out to 150 yds, but for defensive purposes you're looking at a bullet drop measured in feet, not inches, past about 100 yards.

    ShootersCalculator.com | Ballistic Trajectory Calculator
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    Senior Member Array Gunnie's Avatar
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    For a PCC I say 25yds should give you kill zine hits out to 100yds.

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    Quote Originally Posted by gasmitty View Post
    It really depends on your particular load, and your "point blank range" requirements.

    Using a decent ballistics calculator like the one linked below, for your 147 gr load if you zero at 25 yds your POI will be within 2" out to 80 yds. If you're just ringing steel plates you can probably extend that out to 150 yds, but for defensive purposes you're looking at a bullet drop measured in feet, not inches, past about 100 yards.

    ShootersCalculator.com | Ballistic Trajectory Calculator
    Your link appears to be empty of data. If you would, please try it again, then click the Create a Link to This Graph and Chart button just below the chart. The page will reload and you'll see a "Trajectory Link Created" at the top.

    I entered your values, created a chart, and your input values and chart are depicted here.

    25 yards is very close-in for a zero angle with a 1.5 inch sight height. It's calculating a 3 inch rise at 140 yards before it falls to a 2 inch rise at 200 yards.

    Nothing "measured in feet," though. Not at 2,850 fps.
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    You have to enter your own ballistic load info - the link just takes you to the tool. My values entered for 9mm & 147 gr had nothing related to a 3" rise at 149 yards!
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    Now, let's do this for a typical handgun round, the Winchester Silvertip JHP 9mm Luger, 147 Grains.

    As you can see from this charter, things are significantly different. I'm centering at 10 yards (30 feet) as that's the maximum line of sight distance inside my home. Even so, the graph crosses the 0 height line again at 30 yards (100 feet), but remains within one (1) foot even out to 100 yards. So, if you want to hit center body mass at 100 yards, aim for the neck.

    Again, no drops measured in feet, even with this round's slow muzzle velocity of 1,010 fps due to it's relatively heavy mass.
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  16. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by gasmitty View Post
    You have to enter your own ballistic load info - the link just takes you to the tool. My values entered for 9mm & 147 gr had nothing related to a 3" rise at 149 yards!
    No, if you follow my instructions, the calculator will create a link to the data you entered so that no one else will need to reenter the data.
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