REM MOD 7 Upgrade

REM MOD 7 Upgrade

This is a discussion on REM MOD 7 Upgrade within the Defensive Rifles & Shotgun Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; Like many my M7 in .260 Rem was mediocre at best, minute of deer on a good day. My boy's killed a couple with it, ...

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Thread: REM MOD 7 Upgrade

  1. #1
    VIP Member Array Chuck R.'s Avatar
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    REM MOD 7 Upgrade

    Like many my M7 in .260 Rem was mediocre at best, minute of deer on a good day. My boy's killed a couple with it, but I couldn't get it under 1.5-2 MOA consistently. It's got a very nice little Leupold VX3 2.5x8 on it and overall makes a great little package for stands and carrying, but not something I'd take out to western KS chasing mulies.

    Broke down and bought an HS Precision stock and it arrived a couple weeks ago. Took it out back with my "best" 120 Nosler load, which with the old stock was a little over 1.5 MOA. Here's the result at 100ys:



    Conditions were pretty good, 62 degrees, 3-5 variable 9 O'clock, Shots 1+2 showed promise...then shot 3 lead me to the "here we go again" thoughts. Right up until shots 4+5 were touching it for .424"!!

    I think that shots 1&2 (clean bore) settled it into the stock.

    So I figured it's a fluke. Adjusted the sights and shot 6-8, by now the wind was up a bit, but 3 into .757". By now I had 2 rds left, so I moved to a piece of steel at 220 yards and aimed midway between the bull & edge due to wind:



    Didn't let the barrel cool, just took 2 shots as if it was a deer.

    So now it's "minute of small deer", the HS stock cut the group size by about 1/2. Might be able to get it a little tighter with some more load development, but I don't think an animal is going to notice the improvement. The chrono stats were pretty impressive for 10rds; 2924 MV, ES 18, SD 6.18. Really very, very, good, especially the MV for the 20" tube. As it sits now:



    Might have to find my son a new rifle.....
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    That's got to be satisfying! But boy, they don't give those H-S stocks away.
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    I don't know much about the Model Seven, but I'd be curious to see how the action is bedded in the OEM stock. My .30-06 700 (wood stock) accuracy was good but not great. I bought a glass bedding kit, opened up the forearm channel to alleviate any barrel contact, and bedded the receiver per kit directions. Accuracy immediately went sub-MOA with most loads when I did my part. Made a believer of me in checking the bedding of rifles that need a bit better accuracy.
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  5. #4
    VIP Member Array Chuck R.'s Avatar
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    It's my 2nd M7, this was the basic M7 with the plastic stock, no bedding with a couple pressure points towards the forearm tip.

    IAW Remington, the M7s need to have pressure points due to the thin barrels. Just google REM M7 accuracy issues......they're great little gun, but not noted to be tack drivers. The HS stock is the same one that comes as OEM on the new 'HS M7 stainless" and also incorporates a pressure point. The HS stock shaves some weight, makes it balance better and sure as hell helped the accuracy. Overall weight now loaded; scope, mounts, sling, 4rds 120 Nosler BT is right at 7lbs, 14.4 ounces.

    The stock was (is?) my 1st step in fixing this gun, was on my way to having it rebarreled too, but based on today that can wait. I still might drop a new trigger in it.

    My other M7; Mannlicher stocked .350 Rem Mag from the custom shop with Swarovski 1.25-4x. Great timber elk rifle, very accurate and kills on both ends:



    Magnum barrel contour and is free-floated with a bedded action.
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  6. #5
    VIP Member Array G-man*'s Avatar
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    The M7 would fill the bill as the perfect rifle for me, the pinnacle of what would make me happy. Itís got the light weight, potable, handy, fits me perfectly when brought to shoulder level, and with a compact fixed 4x would be everything I ever wanted.

    Problem is, Iíve had a 7mm08, 243 and a 6mm, and I could barely keep the groups on a paper plate at 100 yards, so they are gone.
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  7. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by glockman10mm View Post
    The M7 would fill the bill as the perfect rifle for me, the pinnacle of what would make me happy. Itís got the light weight, potable, handy, fits me perfectly when brought to shoulder level, and with a compact fixed 4x would be everything I ever wanted.

    Problem is, Iíve had a 7mm08, 243 and a 6mm, and I could barely keep the groups on a paper plate at 100 yards, so they are gone.
    Bigger paper plates would have been cheaper.
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  8. #7
    VIP Member Array Chuck R.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by glockman10mm View Post
    The M7 would fill the bill as the perfect rifle for me, the pinnacle of what would make me happy. Itís got the light weight, potable, handy, fits me perfectly when brought to shoulder level, and with a compact fixed 4x would be everything I ever wanted.

    Problem is, Iíve had a 7mm08, 243 and a 6mm, and I could barely keep the groups on a paper plate at 100 yards, so they are gone.
    They can be (are??) frustrating.

    The CDL is supposed to be better, but they upped the barrel thickness/weight to add stiffness. The reports on the HS Precision model have been generally good, but that's a $1100 MSRP and can be found for about $850. There's guys making precision rifles using the M7 action, so that's not the issue. It's just the pencil thin barrel as far as I can tell. Unless you get the load right (perfect), and stock pressure, possibly planet alignment, they kinda suck. Definitely 'minute of deer' at average shot distances, but nothing to write home about. I bought this one for my then 12 year old as a compromise youth rifle. Worked great, was scaled to fit him and was capable out to the longest shots he'd be making 100-150 tops based on terrain. As it was, I'd pass on anything past 200, less if it was a tricky shot.

    I've got some more playing to do before I'm comfortable with it as far as repeat-ability, but the improvement just due to the stock swap was worth it.
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  9. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by glockman10mm View Post
    The M7 would fill the bill as the perfect rifle for me, the pinnacle of what would make me happy. Itís got the light weight, potable, handy, fits me perfectly when brought to shoulder level, and with a compact fixed 4x would be everything I ever wanted.

    Problem is, Iíve had a 7mm08, 243 and a 6mm, and I could barely keep the groups on a paper plate at 100 yards, so they are gone.
    I have had M7s in same calibers. They were all the older models with 18.5" length barrels and wood stocks. The 7mm08 was free floated and the 6mm was free floated and bedded. The .243 was a youth model with the birch stock and it shot well from the get go with nothing done to it other than a trigger job. The 7mm08 and 6mm shot around 1.5" at 100 yds with factory loads and the .243 was a sub-moa shooter with handloads.

    @Chuck R. it looks like you have at least found one load that you can be happy with. I suspect that there will be others, too, it you so desire to work them up. I have been organizing my reloading supplies and found that I had 200 new Remington brass cases squirreled away that I had forgotten about. I couldn't remember owning a .260 and checked my records and found that I had a Model 70 Custom Shop .260 for a short time. I never even got a chance to shoot it before selling it. Sort of an oddball rifle with the Remington cartridge chambered in a Winchester. I always thought it would be interesting to see how it shot with it's heavier and longer barrel compared to what was normally found.
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  10. #9
    VIP Member Array G-man*'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck R. View Post
    They can be (are??) frustrating.

    The CDL is supposed to be better, but they upped the barrel thickness/weight to add stiffness. The reports on the HS Precision model have been generally good, but that's a $1100 MSRP and can be found for about $850. There's guys making precision rifles using the M7 action, so that's not the issue. It's just the pencil thin barrel as far as I can tell. Unless you get the load right (perfect), and stock pressure, possibly planet alignment, they kinda suck. Definitely 'minute of deer' at average shot distances, but nothing to write home about. I bought this one for my then 12 year old as a compromise youth rifle. Worked great, was scaled to fit him and was capable out to the longest shots he'd be making 100-150 tops based on terrain. As it was, I'd pass on anything past 200, less if it was a tricky shot.

    I've got some more playing to do before I'm comfortable with it as far as repeat-ability, but the improvement just due to the stock swap was worth it.
    Ive got one of those new cheap package deal Remingtons in 270 with the cheap Bushnell scope that came on it that was given to me, and that sucker shoots like a house on fire.....go figure.

    Truth is, unless I venture out west, or hunt Elk down in the lower part of the state where shots can be 200-500 yards, my old 30-30 and 44 mag carbines shoot better and are cheaper than the M7ís Iíve had, and are plenty for my hunting terrain.
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  11. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by glockman10mm View Post
    Ive got one of those new cheap package deal Remingtons in 270 with the cheap Bushnell scope that came on it that was given to me, and that sucker shoots like a house on fire.....go figure.

    Truth is, unless I venture out west, or hunt Elk down in the lower part of the state where shots can be 200-500 yards, my old 30-30 and 44 mag carbines shoot better and are cheaper than the M7ís Iíve had, and are plenty for my hunting terrain.
    I picked up one of the Remington 783 .30-06 package deals last year, too, on sale on line and was very pleased with how it shot. My whitetail hunting in Missouri can vary from open to wooded terrain. Anymore I base what I am going to hunt with more on my feelings of nostalgic attachment than anything else. A well worn Remington M760 slide action .30-06 as often as not gets the nod.
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  12. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Old Man View Post
    A well worn Remington M760 slide action .30-06 as often as not gets the nod.
    I came within a coin toss of getting one of those way back when. I was heading out west (Eastern WA) and decided a bolt-action rifle was a better choice for the more open countryside. Had I been staying in central GA, the pump would have been the winner. No regrets ever on the Rem. 700.
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  13. #12
    VIP Member Array Chuck R.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldVet View Post
    I came within a coin toss of getting one of those way back when. I was heading out west (Eastern WA) and decided a bolt-action rifle was a better choice for the more open countryside. Had I been staying in central GA, the pump would have been the winner. No regrets ever on the Rem. 700.
    When I was stationed at Ft. Lewis and chasing Roosevelts, I almost pulled the trigger on the coolest 760-7600 I'd ever seen. Saw it at a gunshow, and the owner was asking what it was worth, but more than I was willing to pay. He'd taken a standard 760 in 35 Whelen with composite stock, had it hard-chromed to survive the Pacific Northwet and mounted a 1.25-4X on it, with a back-up peep sight. Basically it was his (and my) idea of the perfect timber elk rifle.

    I ended up going the M7 MS route with my .350, little more compact, not as weather hardy with slower follow up shots. In someways the terrain (as far as shots go) was sort of like here in eastern KS, but instead of wooded with row crop fields, there it was wooded with clear cuts. Needed a gun/caliber flexible enough to cover both.
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