What options do you have, if any, on your home defense shotgun? - Page 4

What options do you have, if any, on your home defense shotgun?

This is a discussion on What options do you have, if any, on your home defense shotgun? within the Defensive Rifles & Shotgun Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; I took my inherited Rem 1100 12 ga, added a mag extension, barrel clamp, and one of those elastic stock shell holders and said, "Say ...

View Poll Results: What accessories do you have mounted on your home defense shotgun?

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  • Red dot optic

    2 4.00%
  • Weapon mounted light

    24 48.00%
  • Sling

    19 38.00%
  • Side saddle shell (ammo) holder

    31 62.00%
  • Magazine tube extension

    17 34.00%
  • Barrel clamp

    5 10.00%
  • Other

    14 28.00%
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Thread: What options do you have, if any, on your home defense shotgun?

  1. #46
    VIP Member Array OldVet's Avatar
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    I took my inherited Rem 1100 12 ga, added a mag extension, barrel clamp, and one of those elastic stock shell holders and said, "Say hello to my little friend!"
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  2. #47
    Distinguished Member Array TSKnight's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by retired badge 1 View Post
    Nine grandchildren, five great-grandchildren, so I have some difficulty in recent years just keeping firearms on hand. They seem to migrate away to the kids' homes somehow.

    Only shotgun I have left is a Remington 870 'Sportsman 12' model, about 40 years old now. Plain walnut stock, matte finish, 12 Ga. 3" chamber, 21" vent-rib barrel with Rem-Choke system. I added a sling years ago because I like having a sling in the field.

    Around the house it is kept with a full magazine of 2-3/4" heavy field loads of BB-shot (roughly 90 pellets of .17-.18 caliber lead balls), chamber empty, action cocked, safety engaged, Improved choke tube. To deploy the shotgun requires hitting the slide release, racking the slide to chamber a round, releasing the safety (faster to do than to explain, and 50 years experience with the 870 makes it next to automatic for me). No need to worry about penetrating multiple frame walls. Longest distance inside my home is less than 40 feet, so I doubt that the recipient would notice much difference between 1-1/4 oz. of BB-shot and an equal dose of 00-buck.

    With the Modified choke the Remington is great for pheasants, chukar, ptarmigan, or small game. Add steel shot and a magazine plug and it works very well for geese and ducks.

    With the Hastings Extra-Full Turkey Choke this shotgun has won every turkey shoot it has been to, and done so with several other people shooting it. At my club's annual turkey shoot they got so tired of my gun winning they insisted on one round in which everyone gets to use my shotgun.

    About as close as I can get to an ideal all-around shotgun!

    YMMV
    Is there a specific reason for leaving the action locked?
    I was trained to keep a shotgun "cruiser ready" with the firing pin at rest and the safety off. To deploy just rack the slide.

    I have seen the action open while in the gun rack in a squad a few times. That may be one reason to keep the action locked. Can only imagine what might find it's way in the action being in a squad car.
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  3. #48
    VIP Member Array G26Raven's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldVet View Post
    I took my inherited Rem 1100 12 ga, added a mag extension, barrel clamp, and one of those elastic stock shell holders and said, "Say hello to my little friend!"
    Wait! You have friends????
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  5. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by G26Raven View Post
    Wait! You have friends????
    My guns all get Christmas cards. At least I can depend on them.
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    Retired USAF E-8. Curmudgeon on the loose.
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  6. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by TSKnight View Post
    Is there a specific reason for leaving the action locked?
    I was trained to keep a shotgun "cruiser ready" with the firing pin at rest and the safety off. To deploy just rack the slide.

    I have seen the action open while in the gun rack in a squad a few times. That may be one reason to keep the action locked. Can only imagine what might find it's way in the action being in a squad car.
    Yes, there is a reason for leaving the action cocked & locked. It is a basic safety precaution. Those who are not familiar with pump-action shotguns in general, or the Remington 870 in particular, will require some time and effort to figure out how to make it function. I am very familiar with the Remington 870 and I can make it work very quickly.

    Years ago working a patrol unit the shotgun was kept in a rack that provided a lock around the weapon at a point just behind the fore-arm, which prevented the action from being cycled while in the locked rack. Working unmarked cars we usually kept the shotgun in the trunk (some were equipped with locking racks, some were not). When working a unit with issued shotgun I learned to always remove it from the rack at the beginning of each shift, check the chamber, barrel, and magazine as well as testing for proper functioning. The list of what I have found in duty shotgun barrels is long (cigars, candy wrappers, chewing gum, pencils or pens, etc). The lesson I carried forward was that one person must be made responsible for any item of equipment we expect to be properly maintained.

    Even earlier, shotguns were not issued equipment. Some officers carried shotguns, but they were privately purchased. There were no locking racks in any of the vehicles. For those who are interested, we also purchased our own handguns (from an approved list) and all other uniforms and equipment. Actually, relatively few departments (usually the larger agencies) issue handguns even today; most require the individual officers to purchase and maintain their own.
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  7. #51
    VIP Member Array CDW4ME's Avatar
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    Shockwave 20ga, light/laser and a shell carrier:
    What options do you have, if any, on your home defense shotgun?-shockwave1.jpg
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    I'm not inclined to disarm for a concert, game, (entertainment) and I ain't going on a plane or cruise.
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  8. #52
    VIP Member Array Nmuskier's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by retired badge 1 View Post
    The Remington 870 most definitely does have a slide release, located just forward of the trigger guard. That is how you unlock the action when in the cocked position in order to clear the weapon or chamber a round.
    Are you referring to the action lock?
    Remington 870 Shot Gun Basic Disassembly

    A "slide release" would be something on an auto loader. Hitting that would imply closing a locked open action.

    I would recommend switching to decafe, and reign in personal attacks on people you know nothing about. Greenhorn
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  9. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nmuskier View Post
    Are you referring to the action lock?
    Remington 870 Shot Gun Basic Disassembly

    A "slide release" would be something on an auto loader. Hitting that would imply closing a locked open action.

    I would recommend switching to decafe, and reign in personal attacks on people you know nothing about. Greenhorn
    I stand corrected. Good 870 disassembly information, I have never seen that before. Back in the old days we were trained on the shotgun and started using the parts nomenclature that the older guys used. At that time a lot of us walked foot beats in the downtown area (no shotgun), kept an eye on the tower lights to tell us when to go to a call box and check in with the dispatcher (we had portable radios, about the size of a large brick, weighing about 4 lbs, but the battery was good for about 45 minutes of receiving or 20 minutes of transmitting, so it was only for emergency use). The first soft body armor came on the market about my third year on the job. Hollow point ammo was still a very new thing (and quite controversial). Revolver speed loaders were still in the future. Firearms were made out of blued steel and walnut, not Tupperware. Most of us young guys were Vietnam combat vets, and most of the bosses were World War 2 veterans. The department arms room contained 6 Thompson submachineguns and a couple of BAR's. Ashtrays were provided in the break room, the report room, the dispatch shack, and the shift commander's office. Fortunately, there were no more dinosaurs.

  10. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldChap View Post
    I didn't read carefully enough.

    I try to select a shotgun with major "add-ons" already factory installed.

    My personal add-ons are: shorter LOP stock, light, side-saddle shell holder and sling. Slings are very important in weapon retention, unless you're the Hulk kind of shooter.


    "Slings are to shotguns, what holsters are to pistols." ~ Clint Smith
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  11. #55
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    The racks in police cruisers lock the shotgun into the rack with a band between the receiver and the forend. That serves two functions, holds the weapon securely, and keeps the action closed and unable to be cycled.

    I think most manufacturers call the little lever that releases the slide an "action release" but I've never seen an official name for it. So...I just call it the "little thingamabob that you have to push."
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  12. #56
    Distinguished Member Array TSKnight's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by retired badge 1 View Post
    Yes, there is a reason for leaving the action cocked & locked. It is a basic safety precaution. Those who are not familiar with pump-action shotguns in general, or the Remington 870 in particular, will require some time and effort to figure out how to make it function. I am very familiar with the Remington 870 and I can make it work very quickly.

    Years ago working a patrol unit the shotgun was kept in a rack that provided a lock around the weapon at a point just behind the fore-arm, which prevented the action from being cycled while in the locked rack. Working unmarked cars we usually kept the shotgun in the trunk (some were equipped with locking racks, some were not). When working a unit with issued shotgun I learned to always remove it from the rack at the beginning of each shift, check the chamber, barrel, and magazine as well as testing for proper functioning. The list of what I have found in duty shotgun barrels is long (cigars, candy wrappers, chewing gum, pencils or pens, etc). The lesson I carried forward was that one person must be made responsible for any item of equipment we expect to be properly maintained.

    Even earlier, shotguns were not issued equipment. Some officers carried shotguns, but they were privately purchased. There were no locking racks in any of the vehicles. For those who are interested, we also purchased our own handguns (from an approved list) and all other uniforms and equipment. Actually, relatively few departments (usually the larger agencies) issue handguns even today; most require the individual officers to purchase and maintain their own.
    Thanks
    I assumed that was the reason, but you know what that means. I

    The locks in our newer squads are "one size fits all" suitable to secure most long guns, but not lock the action.
    That is why I have seen the action open while in the lock.

    I have an older shotgun lock made specifically for the Mossberg 500. It has fits around and covers the action and the slide can not be moved while in the lock.
    Last edited by TSKnight; November 15th, 2019 at 12:31 PM. Reason: Add content
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  13. #57
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    What options do you have, if any, on your home defense shotgun?

    Tacticool Special Purpose
    Magpul sling & GG&G front sling attachment
    Magpul SGA stock set
    Esstac velcro shell carrier
    Magazine tube extension
    Wilson high visibility follower
    XS Big Dot tritium express front sight
    What options do you have, if any, on your home defense shotgun?-special-purpose-magpul.jpg

    Old school K-120 18-7
    Cheap nylon AR sling
    Cheap nylon butt cuff
    What options do you have, if any, on your home defense shotgun?-k120-18-7.jpg
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  14. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by retired badge 1 View Post
    I stand corrected. Good 870 disassembly information, I have never seen that before. Back in the old days we were trained on the shotgun and started using the parts nomenclature that the older guys used. At that time a lot of us walked foot beats in the downtown area (no shotgun), kept an eye on the tower lights to tell us when to go to a call box and check in with the dispatcher (we had portable radios, about the size of a large brick, weighing about 4 lbs, but the battery was good for about 45 minutes of receiving or 20 minutes of transmitting, so it was only for emergency use). The first soft body armor came on the market about my third year on the job. Hollow point ammo was still a very new thing (and quite controversial). Revolver speed loaders were still in the future. Firearms were made out of blued steel and walnut, not Tupperware. Most of us young guys were Vietnam combat vets, and most of the bosses were World War 2 veterans. The department arms room contained 6 Thompson submachineguns and a couple of BAR's. Ashtrays were provided in the break room, the report room, the dispatch shack, and the shift commander's office. Fortunately, there were no more dinosaurs.
    True, it seems slide release and "action bar lock" (what Remington calls it) have become interchangeable.

    https://www.remington.com/sites/defa...202013-091.pdf
    "The pistol, learn it well, carry it always ..." ~ Jeff Cooper

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  15. #59
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    I considered things years ago and determined that I'd rather forego the pump shotgun for home defense in favor of the automatic. Not certain that better one-handed operation is much important in the overall scheme of things, but considered that angle. A spare barrel was secured for this Remington Model 11 and the old thing runs like a sewing machine set up this way.



    As it is I decided that reloads with any magazine-fed shotguns were too fumble-y so retired the shotgun back to the duck blind in favor of an M1 Carbine.

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  16. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by bmcgilvray View Post
    I considered things years ago and determined that I'd rather forego the pump shotgun for home defense in favor of the automatic. Not certain that better one-handed operation is much important in the overall scheme of things, but considered that angle. A spare barrel was secured for this Remington Model 11 and the old thing runs like a sewing machine set up this way.



    As it is I decided that reloads with any magazine-fed shotguns were too fumble-y so retired the shotgun back to the duck blind in favor of an M1 Carbine.

    You were the first guy I thought of when I watched The Highwaymen, besides being Maney's twin, Pancho carried your shotgun (so what his was an A5 )

    What options do you have, if any, on your home defense shotgun?-600px-highwaymen_39.jpg
    JD and bmcgilvray like this.
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    End the cycle of hatred, donít give them a tomorrow."




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